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kittle545feet
02-24-2004, 05:03 PM
i mention on my personal page and by my user id that one of the greatest sox memories is when kittle hit his last roofshot. it was in april of 1990 (i believe) against the red sox. rob murphy was the pitcher and the ibm tale of the tape said 545 feet. now i know that is not the most accurate measurement but the ball did land on the back of the roof in left center and not down the line. it was to the right of the power alley marked 375. anyways, i happend to be there right behind the first base dugout with my dad and brother and a few friends, and it sounded like shotgun went off. i have never seen a ball hit harder or farther before or since and my dad agreed and he has been going to games for 50 years. i know the ball is in the sox hall of fame in the ball case and its labled. it also has a huge black mark on the ball. sometimes during games, they will flash back on the anniversary and show the replay but not lately. does anybody else remember this homer and if so, why is it not shown or talked about more often as one of the furthest homers hit at the old park? :o:

HITMEN OF 77
02-27-2004, 01:56 AM
Good question. I wasn't there, but have seen clips of it on TV. It was a BOMB! I didn't know the Sox had a HOF. Maybe I never paid any attention. Is it at Comsikey Park?

StillMissOzzie
02-27-2004, 02:37 AM
Originally posted by HITMEN OF 77
Good question. I wasn't there, but have seen clips of it on TV. It was a BOMB! I didn't know the Sox had a HOF. Maybe I never paid any attention. Is it at Comsikey Park?

They have a mini-museum/HOF on the lower level of USCF right behind home plate.

SMO
:gulp:

HITMEN OF 77
02-27-2004, 12:53 PM
I will have to check that out when I come back this spring for so games. Thanks SMO

ode to veeck
02-27-2004, 05:04 PM
I don't remember the shot in the thread starter here, but the only roof shot I ever was at the park for was hit by Kittle in about the same spot earlier in the 80s. We had seats in the upper deck and couldn't believe the ball roofed it right over us. I have no recollection of specific year or opponent etc. I don't think it was 1990 as I was already in CA and the only Comiskey games I saw that year were the Boston series late in the season, where I recall 3B grandstand seats for one day game and club section seats for Sat night game (1st few rows upper deck behind the plate)

Lip Man 1
02-27-2004, 07:43 PM
The other thing about that blast was the weather was awful, cold and damp. Things that would hurt distance for a ball. By the way, Kitty talks about that (and his other roof top home runs) in his WSI Interview.

Lip

Paulwny
02-27-2004, 08:00 PM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
The other thing about that blast was the weather was awful, cold and damp. Things that would hurt distance for a ball. By the way, Kitty talks about that (and his other roof top home runs) in his WSI Interview.

Lip


You may have forgotten this discussion Lip :smile:

Paulwny
02-27-2004, 08:05 PM
Originally posted by Paulwny
You may have forgotten this discussion Lip :smile:

WHAT AN ASS ,I forgot the link

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&threadid=22212&highlight=baseball+and+humidity

jamteh
02-27-2004, 08:57 PM
I saw the Bull, Greg Luzinski, hit one on the roof back in '83 . I have no idea how far that thing went, but it was a jack and a half. It seemed like the Sox could hit the roof almost at will that year.

Fenway
02-27-2004, 09:07 PM
looking at the Boston Globe archives Kittle had several roofers against us

May 24, 1983

But the home run that had everybody buzzing was the shot by Kittle in the bottom of Chicago's eight-run first. Kittle's wallop clipped the edge of the roof of the upper deck, 70 feet from ground level. Few balls have been hit out of Comiskey Park, and this three-run blast, more than 470 feet, came close.


Wind or no wind, it was a sight to behold.


"The only time I've gone to the roof before," said Kittle, "was in batting practice when I was here for a tryout in 1978. The Dodgers had released me and I must have hit about six or seven balls up there off Bruce Dal Canton. You don't forget things like that.


"The ball I hit off Bird was a slider that didn't break too much. I saw the home run after the game on television and the announcer told me to keep talking while I watched. But I couldn't."

April 29, 1984

Kittle said he guessed right on a Nipper slider for his first home run - a roof job that, despite all the protest the Red Sox could muster about the ball hooking away from the imaginary foul pole, was called fair.


"I know he's got a good fastball," said Kittle. "But it was just the situation (1-1 count) that I thought he might throw a slider. So I moved up to the plate and caught it just right." The ball travelled over 400 feet, leaving Comiskey Park on one bounce.


The scouting report on Kittle is to keep the ball in, and away from the middle of the plate. Nipper tried to go high and tight, and Kittle went long and deep for his three-run game-winner in the third.

The original call was made by third base umpire Mike Reilly, the same umpire that two years ago infuriated the Red Sox with a similar call in Oakland. Two Boston players got bounced yesterday while protesting Reilly's ruling, which was backed up by plate umpire Al Clark. Houk didn't get thrown out, but it wasn't because he didn't try.

Clark said he merely agreed with Reilly's contention that the ball was fair when it went out of the park and was foul when it landed.

"I told the Red Sox catcher (Rich Gedman)," said Clark, "that I hope he (Reilly) calls it fair, because it was. I was right on the line, and so was Reilly. That's the only angle to see that particular ball from.

"Don Denkinger at first base thought it was foul from where he was standing. But he did come to me and ask me my view, and I told him it was fair, and that was all there was to it. Home run."

And ballgame.

August 8, 1985

Ron Kittle was hot, too, with a four-hit performance in the opening game of the "second season" for the teams (after the one-day strike was settled). Kittle hit two home runs off Bobby Ojeda, one of which bounced off the roof and was last seen heading for downtown Milwaukee.

April 17, 1990
The Red Sox yielded a 1-0 lead when Ron Kittle blasted a Rob Murphy fastball onto the roof in the sixth inning, a shot estimated at over 450 feet. It was Murphy's second offering to Kittle after he had replaced the injured John Dopson (stiff elbow) with one out in the sixth.

"Boy, that was a shot," said White Sox manager Jeff Torborg. "If it wasn't cold tonight, imagine how far that ball would have traveled. Maybe to the John Hancock building."

ode to veeck
02-28-2004, 03:32 PM
I got intrigued by the link Lip pointed out on the "baseball travels further or not in humid air" thread and came up with some new questions on the topic (see the thread on Lip's link above). I dunno if I was on to something, or whether coffee and vikadin are just a combination that's inconsistent with intelligent thought ...

kittle545feet
02-28-2004, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by fenway
looking at the Boston Globe archives Kittle had several roofers against us

May 24, 1983

But the home run that had everybody buzzing was the shot by Kittle in the bottom of Chicago's eight-run first. Kittle's wallop clipped the edge of the roof of the upper deck, 70 feet from ground level. Few balls have been hit out of Comiskey Park, and this three-run blast, more than 470 feet, came close.


Wind or no wind, it was a sight to behold.


"The only time I've gone to the roof before," said Kittle, "was in batting practice when I was here for a tryout in 1978. The Dodgers had released me and I must have hit about six or seven balls up there off Bruce Dal Canton. You don't forget things like that.


"The ball I hit off Bird was a slider that didn't break too much. I saw the home run after the game on television and the announcer told me to keep talking while I watched. But I couldn't."

April 29, 1984

Kittle said he guessed right on a Nipper slider for his first home run - a roof job that, despite all the protest the Red Sox could muster about the ball hooking away from the imaginary foul pole, was called fair.


"I know he's got a good fastball," said Kittle. "But it was just the situation (1-1 count) that I thought he might throw a slider. So I moved up to the plate and caught it just right." The ball travelled over 400 feet, leaving Comiskey Park on one bounce.


The scouting report on Kittle is to keep the ball in, and away from the middle of the plate. Nipper tried to go high and tight, and Kittle went long and deep for his three-run game-winner in the third.

The original call was made by third base umpire Mike Reilly, the same umpire that two years ago infuriated the Red Sox with a similar call in Oakland. Two Boston players got bounced yesterday while protesting Reilly's ruling, which was backed up by plate umpire Al Clark. Houk didn't get thrown out, but it wasn't because he didn't try.

Clark said he merely agreed with Reilly's contention that the ball was fair when it went out of the park and was foul when it landed.

"I told the Red Sox catcher (Rich Gedman)," said Clark, "that I hope he (Reilly) calls it fair, because it was. I was right on the line, and so was Reilly. That's the only angle to see that particular ball from.

"Don Denkinger at first base thought it was foul from where he was standing. But he did come to me and ask me my view, and I told him it was fair, and that was all there was to it. Home run."

And ballgame.

August 8, 1985

Ron Kittle was hot, too, with a four-hit performance in the opening game of the "second season" for the teams (after the one-day strike was settled). Kittle hit two home runs off Bobby Ojeda, one of which bounced off the roof and was last seen heading for downtown Milwaukee.

April 17, 1990
The Red Sox yielded a 1-0 lead when Ron Kittle blasted a Rob Murphy fastball onto the roof in the sixth inning, a shot estimated at over 450 feet. It was Murphy's second offering to Kittle after he had replaced the injured John Dopson (stiff elbow) with one out in the sixth.

"Boy, that was a shot," said White Sox manager Jeff Torborg. "If it wasn't cold tonight, imagine how far that ball would have traveled. Maybe to the John Hancock building." the last one you mention from april17th 1990 is the one i'm talking about. its funny how different the estimates are on the shot. i clearly remember the ibm tale of the tape said 545 feet but like i said, i don't think it was too accurate. i do know this, it was closer to 500 or more than 450. it had a sound and a look to it that i had never seen at that time or since. :gulp:

red faber
02-28-2004, 10:06 PM
Originally posted by kittle545feet
i mention on my personal page and by my user id that one of the greatest sox memories is when kittle hit his last roofshot. it was in april of 1990 (i believe) against the red sox. rob murphy was the pitcher and the ibm tale of the tape said 545 feet. now i know that is not the most accurate measurement but the ball did land on the back of the roof in left center and not down the line. it was to the right of the power alley marked 375. anyways, i happend to be there right behind the first base dugout with my dad and brother and a few friends, and it sounded like shotgun went off. i have never seen a ball hit harder or farther before or since and my dad agreed and he has been going to games for 50 years. i know the ball is in the sox hall of fame in the ball case and its labled. it also has a huge black mark on the ball. sometimes during games, they will flash back on the anniversary and show the replay but not lately. does anybody else remember this homer and if so, why is it not shown or talked about more often as one of the furthest homers hit at the old park? :o:


heck,i think that ball might still be traveling!!!!!!!!

rcescato
02-28-2004, 11:34 PM
I was at that game in 1983. I was sitting near the left field
wall in the upper deck. The ball was still going up when it passed us by. I couldn't believe it. I know it landed on the other side of the street somewhere.
Rich

Lip Man 1
02-29-2004, 03:05 AM
How about the blast Dave Nicholsen hit off the A's Moe Drabowski in May of 64 (?) (It may have been may of 65) That was found in Armour Square.

Lip

mike squires
02-29-2004, 05:12 AM
Aare you referring to Luzinski's shot off of boyd against the redsox? That ball cleared the roof. Leyland said it looked like a gold ball. I was there for that one too. One of my most cherished Sox memories. I wish I had thatone on tape. it was my first Sox game.

kittle545feet
02-29-2004, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
How about the blast Dave Nicholsen hit off the A's Moe Drabowski in May of 64 (?) (It may have been may of 65) That was found in Armour Square.

Lip thats slightly before my time but i can remember my dad talkin' about it. correct me if i'm wrong but wasn't that homer before they moved home plate up? i think they moved home plate up 15- 20 feet at one time in the old park and i think that homer was before it. shows you what a mammoth homer it must have been. :cool:

kittle545feet
02-29-2004, 12:35 PM
Originally posted by mike squires
Aare you referring to Luzinski's shot off of boyd against the redsox? That ball cleared the roof. Leyland said it looked like a gold ball. I was there for that one too. One of my most cherished Sox memories. I wish I had thatone on tape. it was my first Sox game. you bring up a good point about having things on tape. there are so many sox moments i wish i had on tape. old homers, fisk double play at the plate, disco demolition, last game at the old park, these are just a few. too bad there isn't a way to find some of these memories. i guess as long as we keep them in our heads we never lose them. boy you can tell spring training is around the corner, i'm getting mushy! :D:

ode to veeck
02-29-2004, 12:48 PM
thats slightly before my time but i can remember my dad talkin' about it. correct me if i'm wrong but wasn't that homer before they moved home plate up? i think they moved home plate up 15- 20 feet at one time in the old park and i think that homer was before it. shows you what a mammoth homer it must have been.

There was a time before they moved the plate up and when they had the bull pens in foul territory (before the fan hit Tippy Martinez with the beer bottle while he was warming up), that the dimensions to that tall dark green cinder block wall in CF were 440. I remember Chet Lemon stealing lots of balls high off that wall that woulda been easy HRs in just about any other park anywhere

Lip Man 1
02-29-2004, 02:01 PM
A few points:

Nicholson's blast may have been the longest home run in MLB history. It happened on May 6, 1964 in the first game of a double header. Dave would hit three home runs in the twin bill.

The ball cleared the 375 foot marker and landed 135 feet from the base of the left field wall. The recovered ball DID NOT have any signs of tar on it (as you would expect if the ball hit the top of the roof...) although several fans who were in the upper deck swore they heard the ball bounce on the top of the roof. Apparently nobody knows anything for sure.

Kittle: You need to talk to me if you are interested in historic Sox audio and video. I have TV stuff from the early 60's and audio stuff from the early 50's to today. That includes specials, games and yearly highlights (I was in TV for a number of years so I had access to a lot of stuff.)

also that ball Luzinski hit was off of Dennis "Oil Can" Boyd in late August 1983. I've got it on tape. It was his 3rd roof top home run that season. The others were hit off Brian Oelkers and Ray Fonteneu.

Lip

Fenway
02-29-2004, 02:25 PM
I think the Bull's shot still lives in the NESN achives in Boston.

Major problem with White Sox highlights from the late 60's to early 80's. Nobody kept the WFLD and later WSNS tapes. It was shocking when they WS tried to put together an old Comiskey Park video how little was available in Chicago.


Originally posted by kittle545feet
you bring up a good point about having things on tape. there are so many sox moments i wish i had on tape. old homers, fisk double play at the plate, disco demolition, last game at the old park, these are just a few. too bad there isn't a way to find some of these memories. i guess as long as we keep them in our heads we never lose them. boy you can tell spring training is around the corner, i'm getting mushy! :D:

Lip Man 1
02-29-2004, 07:40 PM
The Chicago museum of radio and TV actually has quite a bit of stuff. That's where WGN-TV gets their material for retrospective stories and highlights such as their tribute to the 1977 team, TV video of Bobby Bonds with the White Sox and so forth.

There's more then you think still available...the trouble is getting it!

and I have a ton of TV video from 1981, 1982, 1983 and 1985.

Lip