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SEALgep
02-12-2004, 11:58 PM
This guy is a ways away from the bigs, but I thought people here would like to know some of the picks from the 2003 draft. This guy in particular has some health question marks that make him a risky pick, but if he remains healthy, he gives every indication that he can be something special. Worth the risk with this guy's ceiling at the number 5 pick/fifth round.

Matt Nachreiner, 18 – RHP – Round Rock High School (Texas) Nachreiner was born o_n November 17th, 1984 and is 6’2" and 175 pounds. He is the high school teammate of ninth overall (Rangers) pick John Danks. He posted a better W-L record (12-0) and ERA (0.91) than Danks, but posted a lower K:BB rate (96:40) in 77 innings than Danks’ (135:22) in 72 innings. Nachreiner o_nly gave up 26 hits in those 77 innings. He was committed to the University of Arizona, but has already signed. Rated the 49th overall draft-eligible right-handed pitcher by Baseball America, Nachreiner has a low-to-mid-90's fastball, a sinker, and slider, which he throws in the 88-92 mph range. He was clocked at 92 at the Perfect Game showcase. His high talent level, probably top second to third round, was overshadowed by a big medical uncertainty. As a freshman in high school, it was discovered that the cartilage in his knees had degenerated to the point that doctors told him he o_nly had a short time until he would be forced to give up baseball. He had surgery with the hopes of continuing his baseball career, and lasted through high school. Nachreiner has a somewhat slight build and his reported 175 pounds looks to be accurate, similar in stature to Roy Oswalt. Orthopedics has come a long way in the past 15-25 years, and hopefully the Sox can keep his knees healthy. Even still, he is a high school pitcher with pre-existing injury issues, a slight build and has been throwing a slider for several years. The track record for these types of pitchers is not very good. He has the talent to make it in the big leagues. Health, time and the development of a serviceable change-up or curve will be the deciding factors.


Quote from the Tucson Citizen: Sox Scouting Director, Doug Laumann: "(Nachreiner) is a kid o_n the fast track. This is a kid who has an explosive arm. He has as good a life and sink o_n his fastball as you will see."

Rex Hudler
02-13-2004, 12:24 AM
Unfortunately you won't find him now if you are looking on the fast track. He really struggled in rookie ball at Great Falls. That's not to say he is done or won't bounce back, but he certainly didn't put himself on the fast track.

His numbers.... 2-4 11.25 ERA 28 IP 50 H 20 BB 23 K 7 WP

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 12:33 AM
Originally posted by Rex Hudler
Unfortunately you won't find him now if you are looking on the fast track. He really struggled in rookie ball at Great Falls. That's not to say he is done or won't bounce back, but he certainly didn't put himself on the fast track.

His numbers.... 2-4 11.25 ERA 28 IP 50 H 20 BB 23 K 7 WP Ouch, hopefully he can do better. I'm sure he can bounce from that, he's just still pretty raw. Do you know if he was at least healthy during this year? I hope so, but if he wasn't that may have played into a poor start. He was a gamble, but he still has time to pull it together, and hopefully he does.

SoxxoS
02-13-2004, 12:43 AM
Knowing the Sox past, he probably is currently throwing 81 mph.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by SoxxoS
Knowing the Sox past, he probably is currently throwing 81 mph. I don't think it's that bad, but it is quite a jump for some, going from highschool to professional ball (even if it is at the beginning level.)

Rex Hudler
02-13-2004, 03:17 AM
Originally posted by SEALgep
Ouch, hopefully he can do better. I'm sure he can bounce from that, he's just still pretty raw. Do you know if he was at least healthy during this year? I hope so, but if he wasn't that may have played into a poor start. He was a gamble, but he still has time to pull it together, and hopefully he does.

He made 13 appearances including 5 starts, so it is hard to say if he was completely healthy or if he spent a little time on the DL. Great Falls was used as the Sox Advanced Rookie this past season so in essence he did skip one step. Great Falls was also loaded with hitters this season, including many college draftees. My guess is he probably repeats Great Falls in 2004.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 11:43 AM
Richard Nanita, another outfielder in the Sox system that potentially can be a good player. You can't argue with good plate discipline, here's the scoop on him starting with how he did his first year at Great Falls (R).

Nanita, Ricardo,OF

AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS SLG OBP E

.384 47 185 38 71 7 4 5 37 17 28 11 6 .546 .445 5


Richard Nanita, 22 – L/L – CF – Florida International University (Senior, Florida)
Just before the beginning of the 2003 school year at FIU, Ricardo Nanita transferred from Chipola junior college, the same school Adam Loewen attended, to FIU in the hopes that he could propel himself into the draft. Nanita succeeded in his goal, mainly by leading Florida International in almost every offensive statistical category. The most impressive thing about Nanita though, is his plate discipline. Nanita walked 39 times in 196 at bats, which in-turn led to his .490 OBP. Drafting Nanita could turn out to be as big a steal for the Sox. Nanita has signed with the White Sox and is currently dominating at Great Falls (R).

Randar68
02-13-2004, 11:51 AM
Originally posted by Rex Hudler
He made 13 appearances including 5 starts, so it is hard to say if he was completely healthy or if he spent a little time on the DL. Great Falls was used as the Sox Advanced Rookie this past season so in essence he did skip one step. Great Falls was also loaded with hitters this season, including many college draftees. My guess is he probably repeats Great Falls in 2004.

Straight out of High School to Advanced Rookie League. In addition, the Pioneer League is a hitter's league. Don't put any weight in his #'s. It's a huge adjustment.

Talent is there, health may not be. It's best to be patient and not rush to judgment on a guy like this. Track record for pitchers like him isn't great health-wise.

BTW, why are we going over this again? The draft was what, 8 months ago?

TheRockinMT
02-13-2004, 11:53 AM
I had the chance to watch Nanita play in the Pioneer League last season. He was very impressive with the lumber. Appeared to have great plate discipline and hit the ball where it was pitched, meaning he wasn't trying to pull everything. He also hit with some authority, but I am not to sure about his potential power numbers.

Randar68
02-13-2004, 11:55 AM
Originally posted by SEALgep
Richard Nanita, another outfielder in the Sox system that potentially can be a good player. You can't argue with good plate discipline, here's the scoop on him starting with how he did his first year at Great Falls (R).


Ricardo Nanita is a very raw but physically gifted guy who is pretty physically developed. He should start in High Class A this year, so we'll see what he can do.

Don't be expecting Reed-like numbers or jumps from him. He's got a lot of refining to do.

BTW, the Sox scouting of Florida, especially southern Florida is second-to-none. Helps make up for not doing squat in the Caribbean, I suppose, LOL!

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by TheRockinMT
I had the chance to watch Nanita play in the Pioneer League last season. He was very impressive with the lumber. Appeared to have great plate discipline and hit the ball where it was pitched, meaning he wasn't trying to pull everything. He also hit with some authority, but I am not to sure about his potential power numbers. If he can hit for a good average and uses all of the field, that should be good enough, maybe. But everyone is also excited about Reed who has a similar report, although much further along. Reed won't hit you many homeruns, but he can hit the gaps, and as long as you can get on base, you can be very effective. Getting on base is key, whether it be walk or hit. Maybe he can develop into a good leadoff hitter, assuming Reed hasn't filled that spot in the future. We'll just have to see. Power isn't necessarily important, but I'm also not suggesting that you deemed it was.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 12:10 PM
Originally posted by Randar68
Ricardo Nanita is a very raw but physically gifted guy who is pretty physically developed. He should start in High Class A this year, so we'll see what he can do.

Don't be expecting Reed-like numbers or jumps from him. He's got a lot of refining to do.

BTW, the Sox scouting of Florida, especially southern Florida is second-to-none. Helps make up for not doing squat in the Caribbean, I suppose, LOL! Lol, we should have some emphasis in the Caribbean, didn't we get Carlos Lee from Puerto Rico, or did we stumble upon him like Maggs?

Granted that he isn't Reed, and won't jump like he has done, that was just a good surprise. In my view, the Sox have obtained a lot of outfielding depth, especially in the young, early stage department, which should allow for patience. Hopefully most of these guys reach potential, and at the very least, are good trade bait for us, assuming were locked in with good young solid talent 1-4.

munchman33
02-13-2004, 12:28 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
Lol, we should have some emphasis in the Caribbean, didn't we get Carlos Lee from Puerto Rico, or did we stumble upon him like Maggs?

Actually Carlos is Panamanian.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 12:35 PM
Originally posted by munchman33
Actually Carlos is Panamanian. That's right, I thought about it after I posted, but we drafted him, right?

Randar68
02-13-2004, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
That's right, I thought about it after I posted, but we drafted him, right?

You don't draft players from countries/territories outside the US. Foreign players can sign at age 16.

That is something that has been talked about in revising the Draft that has been discussed for the past several years.

$$$ spent on scouting and signing foreign players in Asia and Central America is something that most clubs do to some extent, but the Sox don't spend the time or money necessary to find and sign top prospects from those regions.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 01:30 PM
Originally posted by Randar68
You don't draft players from countries/territories outside the US. Foreign players can sign at age 16.

That is something that has been talked about in revising the Draft that has been discussed for the past several years.

$$$ spent on scouting and signing foreign players in Asia and Central America is something that most clubs do to some extent, but the Sox don't spend the time or money necessary to find and sign top prospects from those regions. So how did we come by Carlos? We signed him then.

TheRockinMT
02-13-2004, 02:32 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
So how did we come by Carlos? We signed him then.

Yes. We signed Carlos Lee in 1994 as an amatuer free agent. Like to see another move like that one, huh?

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 02:35 PM
Originally posted by TheRockinMT
Yes. We signed Carlos Lee in 1994 as an amatuer free agent. Like to see another move like that one, huh? For sure.

poorme
02-13-2004, 02:44 PM
I remember we drafted a guy named Derek Lee, like 15 years ago in the late rounds. I want to say he was from Florida Central or something. In short season A ball he hit like .350 and 60 SB's. I had high hopes, but those were dashed after he hit like .250 the next year. Several years later he had a cup of coffee with the Twins and that was that.

Anyway, after watching a few players like that, I don't even pay attention until he puts up real solid numbers at high A or AA.

CWSGuy406
02-13-2004, 05:08 PM
For someone who knows the minors well:

Do we have any speedsters (up-and-coming) in our farm system? Well, maybe not speedsters, but leadoff guys who have the potential to steal many bases/be a solid leadoff man?

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 05:15 PM
Originally posted by CWSGuy406
For someone who knows the minors well:

Do we have any speedsters (up-and-coming) in our farm system? Well, maybe not speedsters, but leadoff guys who have the potential to steal many bases/be a solid leadoff man? Reed is considered a lead off hitter, and he has speed, but not the blazing speed you may be talking about. He can steal bases as he does in the minors (40 something), but it is expected to be cut in half when he enters the majors.

Randar68
02-13-2004, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
Reed is considered a lead off hitter, and he has speed, but not the blazing speed you may be talking about. He can steal bases as he does in the minors (40 something), but it is expected to be cut in half when he enters the majors.

Reed is not a "Speed Demon", he just has good instincts on the basepaths.

Robert Valido has good speed. Obviously, Ruddy Yan has great speed, but he couldn't hit a golf ball out of the infield, LOL!. Brian Anderson has better speed than Reed and Chris Young has good base-running speed.

Randar68
02-13-2004, 05:22 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
Reed is considered a lead off hitter, and he has speed, but not the blazing speed you may be talking about. He can steal bases as he does in the minors (40 something), but it is expected to be cut in half when he enters the majors.

Most would not agree that Reed is a lead-off hitter. Ideally, he'd be a #2 or #5 hitter, but he may be our lead-off hitter some time in the next year or 2 more out of necessity.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 05:50 PM
Originally posted by Randar68
Reed is not a "Speed Demon", he just has good instincts on the basepaths.

Robert Valido has good speed. Obviously, Ruddy Yan has great speed, but he couldn't hit a golf ball out of the infield, LOL!. Brian Anderson has better speed than Reed and Chris Young has good base-running speed. I said he doesn't have blazing speed. He is a good solid contact hitter, and if Harris can prove to be a good lead off hitter, maybe putting him in the two hole would fit better. However, he can be a good lead off guy if the scenerio does call for it. I'm not saying this necessarily, but rotoworld.com had an article of the top 50 prospects with a description of each guy. He was the #4 prospect and it said that he had the skills to be the best lead off hitter ever. A bold statement, but one we all would like to see acheived.

Randar68
02-13-2004, 06:03 PM
Originally posted by SEALgep
I said he doesn't have blazing speed. He is a good solid contact hitter, and if Harris can prove to be a good lead off hitter, maybe putting him in the two hole would fit better. However, he can be a good lead off guy if the scenerio does call for it. I'm not saying this necessarily, but rotoworld.com had an article of the top 50 prospects with a description of each guy. He was the #4 prospect and it said that he had the skills to be the best lead off hitter ever. A bold statement, but one we all would like to see acheived.

Rotoworld is now a prospect expert site also?

YIKES.

Sorry, my original response wasn't really aimed at you, but Reed will never become the best leadoff-hitter in his decade. He has OBP, but he doesn't have the speed you look for in a prototypical lead-off hitter and he's going to end up being a 20-HR type of guy, which is pretty wasteful if you're using him as your lead-off hitter.

#2 hitter is his ideal position.

SEALgep
02-13-2004, 06:08 PM
Originally posted by Randar68
Rotoworld is now a prospect expert site also?

YIKES.

Sorry, my original response wasn't really aimed at you, but Reed will never become the best leadoff-hitter in his decade. He has OBP, but he doesn't have the speed you look for in a prototypical lead-off hitter and he's going to end up being a 20-HR type of guy, which is pretty wasteful if you're using him as your lead-off hitter.

#2 hitter is his ideal position. I agree, I hope we can obtain a prototypical lead off hitter, or better yet Harris pans out. Number two sounds good, because the speed he does have can be put to good use there as well. I don't put too much stock in rotoworld, I was just relaying what they said.