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FarWestChicago
09-05-2001, 03:58 PM
Do you realize that if there were no Wild Card in baseball this year the second best team in baseball would not have a shot at the playoffs. Interesting...

voodoochile
09-05-2001, 04:07 PM
Originally posted by FarWestChicago
Do you realize that if there were no Wild Card in baseball this year the second best team in baseball would not have a shot at the playoffs. Interesting...

I never did get the bruhaha over this issue. Personally I've always been a believer that if you finish over .500 in any sport, you should make the playoffs. i know the baseball purists are screaming holy hell, but I like the DH too...

cheeses_h_rice
09-05-2001, 04:13 PM
FarWest, have you read Bob Costas' book "Fair Ball"? It's a really fast, easy read, and I think Costas makes some good points about reasonable divisional re-alignment and a revamped playoff structure that eliminates the Wild Card entirely. Basically, the Astros switch to the American League, creating 6 5-team divisions. The division winner of each goes to the playoffs, with no Wild Card team. The division winner in each league with the best record gets a first-round bye in the playoffs, which would create much-needed tension for some of the stretch runs. Years like this one, in which the A's are the team with the second-best record yet wouldn't make the playoffs, would be an aberration under this system, but Costas makes the point that the interesting races for the Wild Card (like this year in the NL) are far fewer than would be lost under his proposed system, and I tend to agree with him. And getting "home field advantage" in the playoffs would truly mean something to the team that has the best overall record in the league, since they get a first-round bye. The playoffs would be shorter and more intense, as would the divisional races. The Flubbies this year would not have the Wild Card as a fallback, so those remaining games against the Astros would mean so much more.

I recommend the book if you can find it for cheap, or at a library. His other points about revenue sharing and minimum/maximum salaries/salary caps are also worth reading.

FarWestChicago
09-05-2001, 04:21 PM
I think Costas makes some good points about reasonable divisional re-alignment and a revamped playoff structure that eliminates the Wild Card entirely.

Tell that to the A's fan sitting here next to me right now. He does NOT agree with you and Costas. :)

voodoochile
09-05-2001, 04:21 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
FarWest, have you read Bob Costas' book "Fair Ball"? It's a really fast, easy read, and I think Costas makes some good points about reasonable divisional re-alignment and a revamped playoff structure that eliminates the Wild Card entirely. Basically, the Astros switch to the American League, creating 6 5-team divisions. The division winner of each goes to the playoffs, with no Wild Card team. The division winner in each league with the best record gets a first-round bye in the playoffs, which would create much-needed tension for some of the stretch runs. Years like this one, in which the A's are the team with the second-best record yet wouldn't make the playoffs, would be an aberration under this system, but Costas makes the point that the interesting races for the Wild Card (like this year in the NL) are far fewer than would be lost under his proposed system, and I tend to agree with him. And getting "home field advantage" in the playoffs would truly mean something to the team that has the best overall record in the league, since they get a first-round bye. The playoffs would be shorter and more intense, as would the divisional races. The Flubbies this year would not have the Wild Card as a fallback, so those remaining games against the Astros would mean so much more.

I recommend the book if you can find it for cheap, or at a library. His other points about revenue sharing and minimum/maximum salaries/salary caps are also worth reading.

Interesting point. I believe that is the basic idea they are talking about when they eventuallly go to 32 teams. 8 divisions of 4 teams, each division is winner take all. Then there is no need for any first round byes (which I think are universally despised by fans and players alike, unless your team gets it).

voodoochile
09-05-2001, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by FarWestChicago


Tell that to the A's fan sitting here next to me right now. He does NOT agree with you and Costas. :)

*** 'em...

:)

Joking... just joking...

cheeses_h_rice
09-05-2001, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by FarWestChicago


Tell that to the A's fan sitting here next to me right now. He does NOT agree with you and Costas. :)


I know, it does suck if you happen to be the consistently second-best team in your division while the big 800-pound gorilla continually pummels you into submission.

In fact, didn't that happen with the White Sox in the early '70s against the A's a few times?

Randar68
09-05-2001, 04:31 PM
In fact, didn't that happen with the White Sox in the early '70s against the A's a few times?

Don't forget the late 80's/early 90's when we were in the West with the A's....

Tragg
09-05-2001, 10:21 PM
I like the wild card.

In reality, divisional alignments are no more "traditional" than divisions with the wildcard. Plus, the absence of wildcard puts an element of luck into it - if you are unfortunate enough to be in Seattle's division, you're out of luck.

Here are the choices in my book - either no divisions and the winner of the league goes to the WS. Or, if you have divisiions, you must have a wild card to take the geographical luck element out of it.

NUCatsFan
09-05-2001, 10:31 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice

I know, it does suck if you happen to be the consistently second-best team in your division while the big 800-pound gorilla continually pummels you into submission.


Does this gorilla happen to wear pinstripes?