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View Full Version : Rob Neyer on Ozzie


anewman35
11-06-2003, 09:49 AM
Article is here (http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=neyer_rob&id=1654859)

poorme
11-06-2003, 09:59 AM
I think this is the key:

Basically, I think the signs a manager flashes in the dugout are significantly less important than the messages he sends in the locker room. And for all we know, Guillen might be masterful at motivating the troops.

crector
11-06-2003, 10:14 AM
Here's a more relevant excerpt:



"Those 26 walks should raise a red flag, though. Players -- like the rest of us, I suppose -- tend to overrate the value of their own skills, and I suspect that Guillen believes, to this day, that he was a positive force in the White Sox lineup.


He wasn't. Oh, he was a fine defensive player before an injury in 1992 cost him his range. But as a hitter, Guillen was just this side of worthless. He ran fairly well before he got hurt, but singles-hitters who eschew the walk -- remember, 26 walks was the "best" he ever did -- will kill your lineup.

All of which is to say, yes, if Guillen values the qualities that he himself possessed, the White Sox have a problem."

jeremyb1
11-06-2003, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by crector
Here's a more relevant excerpt:

"Those 26 walks should raise a red flag, though. Players -- like the rest of us, I suppose -- tend to overrate the value of their own skills, and I suspect that Guillen believes, to this day, that he was a positive force in the White Sox lineup.

He wasn't. Oh, he was a fine defensive player before an injury in 1992 cost him his range. But as a hitter, Guillen was just this side of worthless. He ran fairly well before he got hurt, but singles-hitters who eschew the walk -- remember, 26 walks was the "best" he ever did -- will kill your lineup.

All of which is to say, yes, if Guillen values the qualities that he himself possessed, the White Sox have a problem."

Hahaha. How is that more relevant than the previous quote which encompasses that quote and reveals Neyer's ultimate opinion on the matter other than the fact that you agree with this one more? I completely agree with the previous quote. As much as I'd like it, our organization isn't progressive enough to hire a manager that will pass around paperback copies of Moneyball to his coaching staff as Neyer remarked in his article. Any manager we hire is going to advocate ineffective practices which exist primarily because they are part of baseball tradition. For this reason the bottom line is going to be the managers ability to get the best possible performance out of the players. I believe that out of the candidates we interviewed, Ozzie is best suited for this purpose.

crector
11-06-2003, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by jeremyb1
Hahaha. How is that more relevant than the previous quote which encompasses that quote and reveals Neyer's ultimate opinion on the matter other than the fact that you agree with this one more? I completely agree with the previous quote. As much as I'd like it, our organization isn't progressive enough to hire a manager that will pass around paperback copies of Moneyball to his coaching staff as Neyer remarked in his article. Any manager we hire is going to advocate ineffective practices which exist primarily because they are part of baseball tradition. For this reason the bottom line is going to be the managers ability to get the best possible performance out of the players. I believe that out of the candidates we interviewed, Ozzie is best suited for this purpose.

Given that the "candidates interviewed" were generally a bunch of losers, that does not say a whole lot for Ozzie's fitness for the job.

A.T. Money
11-06-2003, 10:43 PM
Originally posted by crector
Given that the "candidates interviewed" were generally a bunch of losers, that does not say a whole lot for Ozzie's fitness for the job.

Get over it.