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View Full Version : Pondering what kind of Sox fan you are...


SpringfldFan
10-06-2003, 12:26 PM
I want all of you to imagine a situationfor me if you could. I am not saying this is likely, but it tells a lot about a fan when they are put in a worst case scenario. Imagine you are 100 years old and on your deathbed. Imagine also that in all your time as a lifelong Sox fan, that the Sox never, ever, made it to the world series. Imaging they never could get beyond where they are right here right now. Heck, if you want, you can even imagine the Cubs managed to win the WS, or even became a dynasty.

As you lay there looking back, how do you feel about the time you invested in living and dying with the sox as their lifelong fan. Do you feel it was all worth it? Do you feel the simple fact of following the team was reward enough in itself? Or, on the other hand, do you wish you at least had not followed them so closely? Do you even wish you would have chosen another team when you first started following baseball? For that matter, would you be sorry you invested the time following the MLB at all?

What do you think as you lay there, your last days ticking away, realizing you were never once able to call the Sox "world champions"? I think the anwer would go a long way towards characterizing what kind of Sox fan you are (and its ok, there are many kinds of fans out there). Be honest - IMO there is no wrong answer except a dishonest one.

Hangar18
10-06-2003, 12:28 PM
Im a Bitter, Frustrated and still Knowledgable SOX Fan

voodoochile
10-06-2003, 01:00 PM
In the end, it is supposed to be fun. Anyone who thinks great things are being accomplished on a worldly level by their favorite team winning or losing championships is delusional.

I always have fun watching my favorite teams play. Sure, it is more fun when they win and even more fun when they win championships, but it's really about the journey, not the destination, IMO.

ewokpelts
10-06-2003, 01:08 PM
If I can actually remember any of it, I'd look back on the good things. And then ask for another bedpan.
Gene

Dadawg_77
10-06-2003, 01:09 PM
It is better to have loved and lost then to have never loved at all.

Irishlawyer
10-06-2003, 01:13 PM
it all depends on how much longer Jerry runs the team. Do I outlive him when I am 100?

fuzzy_patters
10-06-2003, 01:19 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
I want all of you to imagine a situationfor me if you could. I am not saying this is likely, but it tells a lot about a fan when they are put in a worst case scenario. Imagine you are 100 years old and on your deathbed. Imagine also that in all your time as a lifelong Sox fan, that the Sox never, ever, made it to the world series. Imaging they never could get beyond where they are right here right now. Heck, if you want, you can even imagine the Cubs managed to win the WS, or even became a dynasty.

As you lay there looking back, how do you feel about the time you invested in living and dying with the sox as their lifelong fan. Do you feel it was all worth it? Do you feel the simple fact of following the team was reward enough in itself? Or, on the other hand, do you wish you at least had not followed them so closely? Do you even wish you would have chosen another team when you first started following baseball? For that matter, would you be sorry you invested the time following the MLB at all?

What do you think as you lay there, your last days ticking away, realizing you were never once able to call the Sox "world champions"? I think the anwer would go a long way towards characterizing what kind of Sox fan you are (and its ok, there are many kinds of fans out there). Be honest - IMO there is no wrong answer except a dishonest one.

I cannot imagine being a fan of another team. I do not believe that there is a group of fans in baseball that are as united through their feelings of being ignored. This is what truly makes the White Sox the real underdog in baseball. Sure, the Red Sox and Cubs have also been losers since the early part of the last century, but they have experienced the dignity of being recognized as having existed. This is the underlying fabric that wraps Sox fans together. To root for the underdog is the American way, and I believe it would be un-American to root for any other team.

SpringfldFan
10-06-2003, 01:45 PM
I guess I should answer my own post. In looking back on the last 30+ years (been a fan since I was a toddler), some of the most cherished moments of my life have involved the Sox. There has been no closer bond between my dad and I growing up and we both have exprienced the hope, disappointment, and ridiculous moments that all sox fans can remember at old and new comiskey. Some of those frustrating times and zany moments could not have happened anywhere else but at Sox games and with Sox fans. I suppose that looking back, regardless, I will be happy I chose and followed the team I did.

Now, to add a little intrigue to the thread, let me add another question: If, somehow, you could tell the future and know for a fact that the Sox will never go to the world series as long as you are alive, how would that affect how deeply you follow the team and how you carry yourself as a fan?

fuzzy_patters
10-06-2003, 01:51 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
I guess I should answer my own post. In looking back on the last 30+ years (been a fan since I was a toddler), some of the most cherished moments of my life have involved the Sox. There has been no closer bond between my dad and I growing up and we both have exprienced the hope, disappointment, and ridiculous moments that all sox fans can remember at old and new comiskey. Some of those frustrating times and zany moments could not have happened anywhere else but at Sox games and with Sox fans. I suppose that looking back, regardless, I will be happy I chose and followed the team I did.

Now, to add a little intrigue to the thread, let me add another question: If, somehow, you could tell the future and know for a fact that the Sox will never go to the world series as long as you are alive, how would that affect how deeply you follow the team and how you carry yourself as a fan?

The interest in sports is in not knowing the outcome beforehand. I would stop following baseball altogether. I cannot imagine rooting for another team, but there is no point in rooting for the Sox if they can never win. I might follow the League at a macro level, but I would not follow any one team closely.

pudge
10-06-2003, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan


Now, to add a little intrigue to the thread, let me add another question: If, somehow, you could tell the future and know for a fact that the Sox will never go to the world series as long as you are alive, how would that affect how deeply you follow the team and how you carry yourself as a fan?

Now that's a good question - that would really suck because I'd probably just stop watching baseball. The whole point is to go for the prize and have the joy of watching your team in the WS. I'm actually a little tired of the regular season, I find myself watching fewer games, I want the real deal or nothing. It doesn't mean I'm ever going to stop being a Sox fan, I just want a World Series. If I never get it, so be it.

fledgedrallycap
10-06-2003, 02:34 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
I want all of you to imagine a situationfor me if you could. I am not saying this is likely, but it tells a lot about a fan when they are put in a worst case scenario. Imagine you are 100 years old and on your deathbed. Imagine also that in all your time as a lifelong Sox fan, that the Sox never, ever, made it to the world series. Imaging they never could get beyond where they are right here right now. Heck, if you want, you can even imagine the Cubs managed to win the WS, or even became a dynasty.

As you lay there looking back, how do you feel about the time you invested in living and dying with the sox as their lifelong fan. Do you feel it was all worth it? Do you feel the simple fact of following the team was reward enough in itself? Or, on the other hand, do you wish you at least had not followed them so closely? Do you even wish you would have chosen another team when you first started following baseball? For that matter, would you be sorry you invested the time following the MLB at all?

What do you think as you lay there, your last days ticking away, realizing you were never once able to call the Sox "world champions"? I think the anwer would go a long way towards characterizing what kind of Sox fan you are (and its ok, there are many kinds of fans out there). Be honest - IMO there is no wrong answer except a dishonest one.

As if Monday's aren't depressing enough...I'll be off looking for a bridge to throw myself over :whiner:

Dadawg_77
10-06-2003, 02:39 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
Now, to add a little intrigue to the thread, let me add another question: If, somehow, you could tell the future and know for a fact that the Sox will never go to the world series as long as you are alive, how would that affect how deeply you follow the team and how you carry yourself as a fan?

Since by nature, no future is set. I would do everything in my power to reverse it and have the Sox win at least once. Though I would imagine it would be like John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, both wanting to out live the other one but only passing on the same day without ever knowing it. It would be my luck that as I am taking my final breath, the Sox won it all. And I was not able to see it.

ChiSoxBobette
10-06-2003, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
I want all of you to imagine a situationfor me if you could. I am not saying this is likely, but it tells a lot about a fan when they are put in a worst case scenario. Imagine you are 100 years old and on your deathbed. Imagine also that in all your time as a lifelong Sox fan, that the Sox never, ever, made it to the world series. Imaging they never could get beyond where they are right here right now. Heck, if you want, you can even imagine the Cubs managed to win the WS, or even became a dynasty.

As you lay there looking back, how do you feel about the time you invested in living and dying with the sox as their lifelong fan. Do you feel it was all worth it? Do you feel the simple fact of following the team was reward enough in itself? Or, on the other hand, do you wish you at least had not followed them so closely? Do you even wish you would have chosen another team when you first started following baseball? For that matter, would you be sorry you invested the time following the MLB at all?

What do you think as you lay there, your last days ticking away, realizing you were never once able to call the Sox "world champions"? I think the anwer would go a long way towards characterizing what kind of Sox fan you are (and its ok, there are many kinds of fans out there). Be honest - IMO there is no wrong answer except a dishonest one.

Would I wish I had chosen another team, never ; I wil go knowing I supported my favorite team the Chicago White Sox win or lose. This year right now I could care less what those other teams do in the playoffs. Baseball ended a couple of Sundays ago when Loiaza won his 21st game vs the Royals. god willing I'll be there next year screaming , cheering , cursing and supporting the only baseball team in Chicago as far as I'm concerned - THE CHICAGO WHITE SOX!

GO WHITE SOX ! :gulp:

SouthSideHitman
10-06-2003, 02:51 PM
As much as I hate to wax rhapsodic about simple, enriching joys of baseball and its character building nature, I'd have to say those were the biggest thing that I would take from my Sox fandom. The Sox taught me many things, that you can forgive people who try and fail but can't accept not trying, that nothing is so bad that it can't be overcome and that most of the time, being smart, passionate and on the right side of something will generally not be enough to get real respect from others. Finally, living in a deeply divided town (baseball-wise) has taught me that certain things about the way you approach something "trivial" (like baseball) speaks loads about your character and whether you are worth my time.

As for the second question, I think that sports is definitly about the thrill of the unknown outcome and if I knew what was gonna happen beforehand in any season in any sport that would just suck the excitment out of it for me and I wouldn't watch.

voodoochile
10-06-2003, 02:57 PM
Originally posted by SouthSideHitman
As much as I hate to who wax rhapsodic about simple, enriching joys of baseball and its character building nature, I'd have to say those were the biggest thing that I would take from my Sox fandom. The Sox taught me many things, that you can forgive people who try and fail but can't accept not trying, that nothing is so bad that it can't be overcome and that most of the time, being smart, passionate and on the right side of something will generally not be enough to get real respect from others. Finally, living in a deeply divided town (baseball-wise) has taught me that certain things about the way you approach something "trivial" (like baseball) speaks loads about your character and whether you are worth my time.

As for the second question, I think that sports is definitly about the thrill of the unknown outcome and if I knew what was gonna happen beforehand in any season in any sport that would just suck the excitment out of it for me and I wouldn't watch.

Well said. Beyond the business side, Sports is about character. It's about learning to lose gracefully. It's about the ride to the top and the view along the way. It's about the beers with friends after big wins and losses. It's not all about winning and losing. It's about how you play and root for the game.

Yes, losing sucks, but if you quit everything that you would never win a championship at, you might as well quit working too, because you are never going to be Bill Gates.

The ending of the 2003 season sucked, but there was so much joy along the way. Remember how you felt when the Sox got Alomar and Everett? Heck, even Lip was happy for a day or two. That's what life is all about and sports is merely a mirror of life. I realize that "Arliss" the HBO show sucked, but the opening line where he talks about athletes being our last warriors is so true in many ways. There are far greater things that can come from sports then mere trophys. Though don't get me wrong, I like tropys too...

toledosoxfan
10-06-2003, 04:19 PM
Well said SouthSideHitman and Voodoo.

MRKARNO
10-06-2003, 04:32 PM
Most of the time the journey is better than the end result. Imagine the white sox won it all. Then what? If there isnt a dynasty then it would have all gone too quickly.

KingXerxes
10-06-2003, 04:49 PM
I view baseball with a little bit more of an entertainment "slant" than most do on these boards. That being said, I think the game is so incredibly steeped in tradition and lore, to call it simply entertainment is not to do it justice. The way I see it, it is a sort of an ongoing epic with chapters being written year after year and new characters constantly being introduced, much like a movie that just keeps going. But it is still an entertainment form, not a life or death struggle, and certainly nothing to get into a fight over.

When I'm about to join the choir invisible, I will take great pride in the balance I maintained in that while I was truly enamored with the game, and understood its nuances, I never placed its priority in too high a position.

FarWestChicago
10-06-2003, 05:04 PM
Originally posted by KingXerxes
I view baseball with a little bit more of an entertainment "slant" than most do on these boards.And many of us are glad you do. :D:

SpringfldFan
10-06-2003, 05:09 PM
Wow, reading these posts make me feel almost like I am watching a Ken Burns feature. I am truly impressed, although I cannot say I am surprised. I dare say I don't think you will find as much insight on too many other boards, and especially not on the north side.

southsidegirl
10-06-2003, 05:30 PM
I could never, ever, EVER root for any team other than the White Sox. When I die, I'll be proud that I stuck with them knowing how often I change my mind.

Hangar18
10-06-2003, 05:54 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
Wow, reading these posts make me feel almost like I am watching a Ken Burns feature. I am truly impressed, although I cannot say I am surprised. I dare say I don't think you will find as much insight on too many other boards, and especially not on the north side.

Ive met lots of Fans, and SOX Fans (white ones) are the brightest, most Clever fans I know. Why do you think I
like them so much?

SpringfldFan
10-06-2003, 06:03 PM
Originally posted by Hangar18
Ive met lots of Fans, and SOX Fans (white ones) are the brightest, most Clever fans I know. Why do you think I
like them so much?

Agreed. When I think about what attracts me to the White Sox, the fans are as big a part of the equation as the players themselves, which come and go. Regardless of what goes on in the field or front office, the brotherhood of Sox fans is always first rate and always there for us.

fuzzy_patters
10-06-2003, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by KingXerxes
I view baseball with a little bit more of an entertainment "slant" than most do on these boards. That being said, I think the game is so incredibly steeped in tradition and lore, to call it simply entertainment is not to do it justice. The way I see it, it is a sort of an ongoing epic with chapters being written year after year and new characters constantly being introduced, much like a movie that just keeps going. But it is still an entertainment form, not a life or death struggle, and certainly nothing to get into a fight over.

When I'm about to join the choir invisible, I will take great pride in the balance I maintained in that while I was truly enamored with the game, and understood its nuances, I never placed its priority in too high a position.

Great simile to a movie. That's probably the best description I have ever read describing what it is like to be a baseball fan.

SouthSideHitman
10-06-2003, 10:00 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
Agreed. When I think about what attracts me to the White Sox, the fans are as big a part of the equation as the players themselves, which come and go. Regardless of what goes on in the field or front office, the brotherhood of Sox fans is always first rate and always there for us.

I think that the White Sox fans' ethos is a huge part of their appeal, because often it is all that is left. We have anti-social and inscrutable owners, maddening managers and teams that often quit right on the verge of putting it all together but a major part of being a Sox fan is how you deal with that and being a part of a group of people who share those same kind of values that you do.

Bisco Stu
10-06-2003, 10:18 PM
Cubs/Red Sox fans are the conformists who attend all the right parties and live in the spotlight.

Sox fans are the sincere men/women of rugged individualism who toil in the darkness.

History is written by the winners, by the masses, by the popular.

For things to change, the Sox have to rewrite history and win 6 WS in a row.

sox_fan_forever
10-07-2003, 12:09 AM
So many of you have written terrific responses I don't feel like there is anything left for me to say except that I definitely would not regret rooting for the Sox my whole life. As many of you have said, one of my favorite parts about being a Sox fan is the bond all of us share. Sure, we may have our differences of opinion, but when all is said and done we're all here for one thing with one goal in mind, even if the way we each think that goal can be accomplished is different. Whether you are at the grocery store or the ballpark, when you meet a fellow Sox fan you just "know." You understand everything about each other, at least baseball wise.

39thandWallace
10-07-2003, 07:29 AM
I don't know if I will root for this team my whole life. How do we know if they will be contracted or out right moved to another city? Gone are the days of blind loyal allegiance by the player and the fan for that matter.

woodenleg
10-07-2003, 10:17 AM
Originally posted by 39thandWallace
I don't know if I will root for this team my whole life. How do we know if they will be contracted or out right moved to another city? Gone are the days of blind loyal allegiance by the player and the fan for that matter.

You expect "blind loyal allegiance" by the players?

I don't.

Sheesh. It's a job - just like yours is.

Seems everybody wants to be a boss - including the fans.

Thunderstruck30
10-07-2003, 08:35 PM
My life will not be complete if I never witness the Sox winnning a World Series. But Im sure there will be some great moments in the future, and Im sure I would cherish those.

39thandWallace
10-08-2003, 06:27 AM
Originally posted by woodenleg
You expect "blind loyal allegiance" by the players?

I don't.

Sheesh. It's a job - just like yours is.

Seems everybody wants to be a boss - including the fans.

Maybe blind allegiance is a little much. But, players used to be loyal to teams and play there entire career with one team. That is what I meant. Why should we raise our blood pressure for millionaire's who don't care?

TornLabrum
10-08-2003, 11:26 PM
Originally posted by 39thandWallace
Maybe blind allegiance is a little much. But, players used to be loyal to teams and play there entire career with one team. That is what I meant. Why should we raise our blood pressure for millionaire's who don't care?

Players used to be loyal to their teams because of something called the "reserve clause." You may have heard of it. It was interpreted by the owners as giving them rights to the players in perpetuity, or until the owners traded them to another team, at which time the players were owned by the new owners in perpetuity.

Of course the owners were really loyal to the players back then. See Ruth, Babe; Fox Nelson; Aparicio, Luis; and others too numerous to mention.

BroadwyBabyMiami
10-10-2003, 01:18 AM
i know that coming from a fan of team who has already won a championship in its very short existence this doesn't mean much but...

i think that the greatest satisfaction for a fan is not to say my team went all the way (though that is a very very nice thing to be able to say), but to say they were fans through it all especially the tough times. that is true pure pride.

dllrbll7
10-10-2003, 02:28 AM
Originally posted by BroadwyBabyMiami
i know that coming from a fan of team who has already won a championship in its very short existence this doesn't mean much but...

i think that the greatest satisfaction for a fan is not to say my team went all the way (though that is a very very nice thing to be able to say), but to say they were fans through it all especially the tough times. that is true pure pride.


This is true to a point but a sane person can only take soo much of second place. Most of us back the Sox thru thick and thin however we let them know if we dont agree with what they are doing or did. There is no way I'm going to be known as a "Lovable Loser" or support a team that losing is accepted. For multiple reasons and alot of bad luck, we havent been able to get the gold at the end of the rainbow but it will be a nice treat for all of us oneday when we finally get there and know how it feels to have everyone looking up at us.

voodoochile
10-10-2003, 12:18 PM
Originally posted by BroadwyBabyMiami
i know that coming from a fan of team who has already won a championship in its very short existence this doesn't mean much but...

i think that the greatest satisfaction for a fan is not to say my team went all the way (though that is a very very nice thing to be able to say), but to say they were fans through it all especially the tough times. that is true pure pride.

I agree, but I just want to win ONE WS title in my lifetime. Your team has been around 1/10th as long as the Sox and you are 1/2 my age and you have already had the pleasure of a baseball championship parade.

sigh...

:selljerry