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View Full Version : Evaluating Greg Walker


soxtalker
09-21-2003, 08:08 PM
I want to pick up on a comment that Tragg posed in the Don Cooper thread that MisterB set up earlier today. Who is responsible for the hitting "problems" of this team -- swinging for HR's and not going after the singles or walks? Is this a Greg Walker philosophy, does it come from higher up in the chain of command, or is it simply the players.

bc2k
09-21-2003, 08:15 PM
I put the entire blame on the selfish hitters. I will never blame Greg Walker, Gary Ward, or Von Joshua for the problems with the power hitters.

I do remember Joe Crede being glad that Walker was added to the Sox because he was his coach in the minors and Joe said he really knows his swing. So maybe Joe's second half hitting rise was helped by Walker.

If KW gutted this team of the selfish power hitters that refused to practice the hitting coach's advice, I would like to see Von Joshua back. That wouldn't be fair to Walker, but it wasn't fair to fire Joshua in the first place.

MHOUSE
09-21-2003, 08:47 PM
I concur: selfish hitters. No hitting coach would simply say swing for the fense in every at bat. Walker had some of the younger guys like Rowand and Olivo putting the ball in play to all parts of the field. It's the veteran guys like Thomas, Valentin, Konerko, etc. who have been swinging for the fences the whole time. Everett has been the only clutch hitter we've had for the last month. Walker seems like a good coach and I wouldn't blame this on him. When the long ball is going we can win by 10, but when it's not then we're dead in the water. We need to make adjustments and some of the guys just don't want to listen.

duke of dorwood
09-21-2003, 08:51 PM
Walker has done a good job-the fact that a Jose Valentin still thinks he's a switch hitter, is not his fault either

Daver
09-21-2003, 09:09 PM
Who do you want to blame for the Sox current hitting trends?

You could blame the Schueler regime,under that regime position players moved through the system based solely on how well they hit,their ability to play any position was an afterthought,if you could hit you moved up quickly.This philosphy is being revamped,but it is hard to undo what ten years of damage has already done.

You also have to keep in mind that a hitting coach on the MLB level is not there to teach per se,he is there to answer questions and work on problems brought to him by the players themselves,and to offer advice and opinions as he sees fit,these guys are supposed to be able to hit if they made it to the MLB level.

Greg Walker does his job,and he does it well as far as I am concerned.

bc2k
09-21-2003, 09:34 PM
Originally posted by MHOUSE
Walker had some of the younger guys like Rowand and Olivo putting the ball in play to all parts of the field.

Does the minor league hitting coach get any credit for shortening Rowand's swing and bringing his hands down? Or did Rowand go down with that suggestion from Walker? I'm just asking, don't know the answer.

bc2k
09-21-2003, 09:38 PM
Originally posted by Daver
Who do you want to blame for the Sox current hitting trends?

You could blame the Schueler regime,under that regime position players moved through the system based solely on how well they hit,their ability to play any position was an afterthought,if you could hit you moved up quickly.This philosphy is being revamped,but it is hard to undo what ten years of damage has already done.

You also have to keep in mind that a hitting coach on the MLB level is not there to teach per se,he is there to answer questions and work on problems brought to him by the players themselves,and to offer advice and opinions as he sees fit,these guys are supposed to be able to hit if they made it to the MLB level.

Greg Walker does his job,and he does it well as far as I am concerned.

If a hitting coach offers "advice and opinions" to his hitters and they refuse that advice, who is at fault? A hitting coach cannot force his hitters to swing for the gaps with linedrives. A hitting coach cannot force his hitters to hit behind runners. Only a manager can discipline the hitter for not listening to his hitting coach. Or in the case of JM, allow the hitters to disrespect his coach.

jeremyb1
09-21-2003, 10:24 PM
I think you can probably place some blame on JM as the manager for not insisting upon a more disciplined approach at the plate from Carlos and from Frank from the time he decided to swing for the fences. Personally I have no problem with guys hitting home runs, the only issue is if there actually is a tradeoff between plate discipline or batting average as there clearly was with Frank (.360 OBP in the second half). The only players I'm really frustrated with though are Carlos who turned his back on the plate discipline that greatly helped him in the second half last season and Frank who sacrificed his batting average and OBP to "air it out" in his words. All the other players' patterns were pretty much consistent with their career numbers.

gosox41
09-21-2003, 11:46 PM
Originally posted by soxtalker
I want to pick up on a comment that Tragg posed in the Don Cooper thread that MisterB set up earlier today. Who is responsible for the hitting "problems" of this team -- swinging for HR's and not going after the singles or walks? Is this a Greg Walker philosophy, does it come from higher up in the chain of command, or is it simply the players.

The fact that the hitters have been through 3 hitting coaches in 3 years tells me something is wrong with their approach. I remember hearing that players didn't like all the meeting Ward had. Well it appears they are more then necessary and some of these primadonnas need to focus on being successful on the fields and not have their oversized egos get stepped on.

Bob

LASOXFAN
09-22-2003, 12:31 AM
Originally posted by jeremyb1
I think you can probably place some blame on JM as the manager for not insisting upon a more disciplined approach at the plate from Carlos and from Frank from the time he decided to swing for the fences. Personally I have no problem with guys hitting home runs, the only issue is if there actually is a tradeoff between plate discipline or batting average as there clearly was with Frank (.360 OBP in the second half). The only players I'm really frustrated with though are Carlos who turned his back on the plate discipline that greatly helped him in the second half last season and Frank who sacrificed his batting average and OBP to "air it out" in his words. All the other players' patterns were pretty much consistent with their career numbers.

I wasn't in the dugout but I would bet my life that Manuel was on these guys constantly. For whatever reason they don't listen to him, and from the recent comments made about Backman, it doesn't sound like they want a manager who gets in their face. :whiner: