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Soxboyrob
09-19-2003, 02:22 PM
For those wanting to discount the importance of walks in our recent discussions about the relative value of Frank, Maggs and/or C.Lee, I think the fact that we drew 2 walks in the entire 3-game series in Minny speaks volumes. Walks translate into runs at a rate of almost 50% for leadoff walks and around 30% for all other walks. In Minny, we didn't walk. In Minny, we couldn't score.

I'd venture to say that if someone did a Sox walks analysis, we'd possibly find that the Sox win at a rate of around .700 when receiving more than 3 walks per game and around .300 when receiving 3 or less. I haven't the knowledge of where to find such stats, but they'd surely emphasize the importance of Frank's and other high OBP guys' contributions.

shane
09-19-2003, 03:59 PM
Originally posted by Soxboyrob
For those wanting to discount the importance of walks in our recent discussions about the relative value of Frank, Maggs and/or C.Lee, I think the fact that we drew 2 walks in the entire 3-game series in Minny speaks volumes. Walks translate into runs at a rate of almost 50% for leadoff walks and around 30% for all other walks. In Minny, we didn't walk. In Minny, we couldn't score.

I'd venture to say that if someone did a Sox walks analysis, we'd possibly find that the Sox win at a rate of around .700 when receiving more than 3 walks per game and around .300 when receiving 3 or less. I haven't the knowledge of where to find such stats, but they'd surely emphasize the importance of Frank's and other high OBP guys' contributions.

You're exactly right. Twinks had 17 walks in this series, we had 2. It's also important to note that their pitchers were placing good strikes to our hitters and letting the defense make plays or getting pop-ups and fly outs. When you're playing a club that loves the first pitch, throw it in there for a strike. More times than not, they'll be out and your pitch count stays low. Garland walked the #9 hitter whose HR threat is practically zero. What is that about? Oh yeah, that #9 hitter ended up scoring.

Randar68
09-19-2003, 04:46 PM
Originally posted by Soxboyrob
For those wanting to discount the importance of walks in our recent discussions about the relative value of Frank, Maggs and/or C.Lee, I think the fact that we drew 2 walks in the entire 3-game series in Minny speaks volumes. Walks translate into runs at a rate of almost 50% for leadoff walks and around 30% for all other walks. In Minny, we didn't walk. In Minny, we couldn't score.

I'd venture to say that if someone did a Sox walks analysis, we'd possibly find that the Sox win at a rate of around .700 when receiving more than 3 walks per game and around .300 when receiving 3 or less. I haven't the knowledge of where to find such stats, but they'd surely emphasize the importance of Frank's and other high OBP guys' contributions.


Walks aren't all that important if all you do is fly out or hit into DP's when there are people on base.

MRKARNO
09-19-2003, 05:11 PM
Both of those 2 were against Guardado, and we all know about all those runs we scored against him....

gosox41
09-20-2003, 01:00 AM
Originally posted by Soxboyrob
For those wanting to discount the importance of walks in our recent discussions about the relative value of Frank, Maggs and/or C.Lee, I think the fact that we drew 2 walks in the entire 3-game series in Minny speaks volumes. Walks translate into runs at a rate of almost 50% for leadoff walks and around 30% for all other walks. In Minny, we didn't walk. In Minny, we couldn't score.

I'd venture to say that if someone did a Sox walks analysis, we'd possibly find that the Sox win at a rate of around .700 when receiving more than 3 walks per game and around .300 when receiving 3 or less. I haven't the knowledge of where to find such stats, but they'd surely emphasize the importance of Frank's and other high OBP guys' contributions.

Walks are huge. Getting on base is the biggest reason. The second is if a pitcher is walking guys it means he is throwing a ton of pitches and that gets to the bull pen earlier.

As for the stat, according to "Moneyball" when the lead off hitter of an inning gets to 1B there is a 55% chance he'll score.

Walks are an important factor also because it probably means the batter knows the strike zone and has the ability to foul off pitches and wait for his pitch. It narrows down the choices of what a pitcher is going to throw in a given situation if he is constantly working deep in counts.

Also, does anyone remember a study that was done showing that if a team worked over the opponents pitching staff in the first game of a 3 game series it gave them a decided advantage the next 2 games? I think LaRussa did the study.

Bob