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Lip Man 1
09-04-2003, 02:35 PM
Just got an e-mail with attachment from a friend who said that Steve Dahl talked about WSI on his Tuesday afternoon show.

If you wish to hear the conversation go to www.dahl.com, click on listen and look for the audio for Tuesday, September 2nd. The conversation takes place about an hour and five minutes into the show. (Once you have downloaded the day you can move quickly ahead to that time slot...)

Dahl says that WSI is a lot like "Blueline" was, a site where fans talk about serious issues with the club. He also praised the site (naturally) because they have a nice area devoted to Disco Demolititon and was really happy over the Loreli interview (congrats Pale Hose George)

Spike says that he hasn't visited the site recently (implying that he has visited in the past...)

It was a great plug from Steve!

Lip

DrCrawdad
09-04-2003, 02:46 PM
What's is (or what was) Blueline?

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 03:03 PM
Damn, I missed that. I was listening to Dahl's show yesterday. He was doing a remote from the Cell. I must have been inside a store (buying a patch cord for my printer) when that happened. Ah, the work of maintaining this site is never done! :smile:

That's high praise from Dahl comparing WSI to Blueline. It was a fanzine published and sold by fans outside Blackhawks games back in the 80's and 90's. They stopped publishing several years ago. Lots of satire, and pretty unique and well-known, too. I didn't pattern WSI after Blueline (the concept started with an English football team's unofficial site, @FC), but I can see where Dahl could make the comparison.

Medford Bobby
09-04-2003, 03:22 PM
Pale Hose I can e-mail the MP3 clip to you upon request!!!!!!!! :gulp:


:eloaiza: CY countdown has begun................ :smile:

SouthBendSox
09-04-2003, 03:43 PM
(fire manuel)

Brian26
09-04-2003, 03:50 PM
Nice publicity from "Stever" yesterday, but that doesn't make him any funnier or wittier. He's still lame as hell, with the perfect example being his constant use of the "The Joan", as if that's even remotely clever.

Dahl sounds gay when he talks about sports. He knows enough to sound slightly knowledgable, but I even heard him last week say he didn't recognize Joe Crede's name.

Give me the coked-up, drunk Stever any day of the week.

Hangar18
09-04-2003, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Nice publicity from "Stever" yesterday, but that doesn't make him any funnier or wittier. He's still lame as hell, with the perfect example being his constant use of the "The Joan", as if that's even remotely clever.

Dahl sounds gay when he talks about sports. He knows enough to sound slightly knowledgable, but I even heard him last week say he didn't recognize Joe Crede's name.

Give me the coked-up, drunk Stever any day of the week.

We Need ANY publicity we can get. If he was a cub fan, the bleacher/yup/fratboys wouldve made him a legend already

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 04:21 PM
Originally posted by Medford Bobby
Pale Hose I can e-mail the MP3 clip to you upon request!!!!!!!! :gulp:

Wow. That would be cool. Send it to george@whitesoxinteractive.com.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 04:45 PM
Originally posted by Hangar18
We Need ANY publicity we can get. If he was a cub fan, the bleacher/yup/fratboys wouldve made him a legend already

Great point. Not only would the bleacher/yuppie/fratboys have long ago elevated Dahl to Flubbie super-fan status, the Cubune would have embraced him and turned him into yet another star in their galaxy of Flubbie "entertainment" legends. The Cubune would know exactly how to exploit the history of Disco Demolition had it happened in their piss-filled ballpark.

It's just another example of how tone-deaf the White Sox are to marketing and public relations. They don't understand the first thing about their fanbase. I sometimes doubt they know the first thing about P.R. and marketing either.

:gallas
"Whatchu talkin' bout, PHG? We've got Half-Price-Flying-Elvis-Bring-Your-Dog-Make-Love-Not-War-Sleepover-Night. What more can we do?"

Brian26
09-04-2003, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Hangar18
We Need ANY publicity we can get. If he was a cub fan, the bleacher/yup/fratboys wouldve made him a legend already

Highly unlikely, Hangar. "Stever" ain't that cool.

Brian26
09-04-2003, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
It's just another example of how tone-deaf the White Sox are to marketing and public relations. They don't understand the first thing about their fanbase. I sometimes doubt they know the first thing about P.R. and marketing either.

Come on, PHG. I rip the Sox marketing department as much as you do, but what the hell are you going to do with Disco Demolition to put a positive spin on it? Nobody in the White Sox fanbase cares about Disco (either positively or negatively) and the event shouldn't be glorified. It was a bush-league promotion by a minor league owner and his son who had no business savvy whatsoever. The promotion destroyed the field, gave the Sox a black eye all over the national media, and didn't make A DIME for the team. When it was all said and done, the Sox lost money on the night of 7/12/79.

voodoochile
09-04-2003, 05:06 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Come on, PHG. I rip the Sox marketing department as much as you do, but what the hell are you going to do with Disco Demolition to put a positive spin on it? Nobody in the White Sox fanbase cares about Disco (either positively or negatively) and the event shouldn't be glorified. It was a bush-league promotion by a minor league owner and his son who had no business savvy whatsoever. The promotion destroyed the field, gave the Sox a black eye all over the national media, and didn't make A DIME for the team. When it was all said and done, the Sox lost money on the night of 7/12/79.

It's part of the history of the game and the Sox. Yeah, it was a crappy thing at the time, but now it is a funny annecdote from our checkered past.

Hiding from it is just lame...

Brian26
09-04-2003, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
It's part of the history of the game and the Sox. Yeah, it was a crappy thing at the time, but now it is a funny annecdote from our checkered past.

Hiding from it is just lame...

Eh. How do you celebrate it or glorify it? Do they celebrate the anniversary of nickel beer night in Cleveland?

Don't mean to sound like 80-year old Bill Gleason, but I just don't find the event to be something that was funny. It's definitely a part of the Sox checkered past, though.

voodoochile
09-04-2003, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Eh. How do you celebrate it or glorify it? Do they celebrate the anniversary of nickel beer night in Cleveland?

Don't mean to sound like 80-year old Bill Gleason, but I just don't find the event to be something that was funny. It's definitely a part of the Sox checkered past, though.

I really never thought too much about it until I read the story here at WSI and the Lorelei interview. It wasn't funny when it happened, but looking back, I think it is okay to smile and shake ones head and say, "What were they thinking?"

No one died. No one was even seriously injured. All that happened is a bunch of fans ran around the field, the turf got torn up and a game got forfeited. Not like it cost the Sox the pennant that year.

I guess it is more a complaint that Reinsdorf tries to completely ignore most of Sox history with the exception of the retired numbers and even they aren't exactly screaming at you. Baseball is at least partially about history and that includes the bad parts. It is this exact mentality that has helped alienate the fan base.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Come on, PHG. I rip the Sox marketing department as much as you do, but what the hell are you going to do with Disco Demolition to put a positive spin on it? Nobody in the White Sox fanbase cares about Disco (either positively or negatively) and the event shouldn't be glorified. It was a bush-league promotion by a minor league owner and his son who had no business savvy whatsoever. The promotion destroyed the field, gave the Sox a black eye all over the national media, and didn't make A DIME for the team. When it was all said and done, the Sox lost money on the night of 7/12/79.

I think you're missing the point. The fact is was bush, minor league, and never to be glorified is sooooooo beyond the point. From a marketing standpoint, you must deal with it precisely because IT HAPPENED. There is nothing the Sox can do to go back and erase it.

Instead of ignoring it, a savvy marketer (or P.R. organization) would embrace the event and spin it to their own advantage. For example, a "Disco Still Sucks" night with a disco-themed fireworks show and performers dressed in platform shoes, satin shirts, and afro wigs would garner the ballclub plenty of national publicity. Why? Because the national media LOVES this sort of stuff. Their audience is comprised of the same people living coast to coast who know about disco music and would pique their curiosity to learn more about it and that crazy riot that ended it all. The Sox have done NOTHING to remind people about Disco Demolition and yet it is still well-known and still draws more hits and inquisitive visitors to this website than any other single feature. That event is deep in the national vein--a watershed event for American pop culture in the 1970's--and you think it has no value to the Chicago White Sox? Come on!

Instead of embracing what they alone can capitalize on, the White Sox marketing department runs away from Disco Demolition as though their hair was on fire. There is maybe one event per decade that can be tied so definitively to a team's history, and fewer still that can stir nationwide nostalgia. The Sox are IDIOTS for not recognizing what the hell they are sitting on.

Frankly, I'm not surprised at their ignorance in the least.

****ing idiots ---------> :reinsy :gallas

Brian26
09-04-2003, 05:56 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Instead of ignoring it, a savvy marketer (or P.R. organization) would embrace the event and spin it to their own advantage. For example, a "Disco Still Sucks" night with a disco-themed fireworks show and performers dressed in platform shoes, satin shirts, and afro wigs would garner the ballclub plenty of national publicity. [QUOTE]

I just don't think that would sell. No offense, PHG. Not saying I can do better than that, but even the Elvis night stuff is very forced and old at this point.

Why? Because the national media LOVES this sort of stuff. Their audience is comprised of the same people living coast to coast who know about disco music and would pique their curiosity to learn more about it and that crazy riot that ended it all. [QUOTE]

Do your homework, PHG. Disco was already dead by the time this riot happened. Disco had been on the decline for two years previous to this. That's one of the reasons the event was so lame to begin with.

The Sox have done NOTHING to remind people about Disco Demolition and yet it is still well-known and still draws more hits and inquisitive visitors to this website than any other single feature. That event is deep in the national vein--a watershed event for American pop culture in the 1970's--and you think it has no value to the Chicago White Sox? Come on! [QUOTE]

Oh, come on! A watershed event for the nation? Give me a break. It was a local radio promotion that got out of control because too many kids from Evergreen Park had nothing better to do on a weeknight and had been smokin' too much weed. Don't give these stoner punks more credit than they deserve. Half the people at the event don't even remember why or how they got there.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 06:51 PM
Originally posted by Brian26

I just don't think that would sell. No offense, PHG. Not saying I can do better than that, but even the Elvis night stuff is very forced and old at this point.

Do your homework, PHG. Disco was already dead by the time this riot happened. Disco had been on the decline for two years previous to this. That's one of the reasons the event was so lame to begin with. Oh, come on! A watershed event for the nation? Give me a break. It was a local radio promotion that got out of control because too many kids from Evergreen Park had nothing better to do on a weeknight and had been smokin' too much weed. Don't give these stoner punks more credit than they deserve. Half the people at the event don't even remember why or how they got there.

Okay-- so I'm marking you down as a Sox Fan who is against the idea. Since you're already a Sox Fan--and I seriously doubt you would stop being one simply because the team embraced its own history, even the stuff you don't like--whether you like the promotion or not is irrelevant.

This is about marketing to people who AREN'T Sox Fans, get it? We bitch and moan around here day after day about how invisible we are on the national stage. I read posts here every day about those bastards at ESPN, Fox, the East Coast biased reporters, the west coast bias, blah, blah, blah... I'm waiting for someone to declare the entire world is out to get the Sox. Oh, wait... I have read that!

Here is the history of the franchise that the Chicago White Sox are fools to try and run from. These events are simply too big to ever be ignored.

1. The Black Sox scandal.
2. Disco Demolition Night.
3. Mont Stratton blowing his leg off.
4. Losing for 40 years straight, 1920-1959.
5. Losing for 43 years straight, 1960-present (and counting).

Does Boston run away from their losing? How about the Flubbies? Can the Sox do less to remember Mont Stratton, fifty years after Hollywood made a movie about him? The Sox are still running away from 1919--and it's the most famous ballclub ever to lose the World Series. Disco Demolition? Ha, not a chance...

What is wrong with this picture? Here are two hints:

1. Smart marketing.
2. Smart P.R.

:reinsy :gallas
"Nobody can ever accuse us of that!"

And the fanbase just melts away...

cheeses_h_rice
09-04-2003, 07:05 PM
Originally posted by Brian26

Do your homework, PHG. Disco was already dead by the time this riot happened. Disco had been on the decline for two years previous to this. That's one of the reasons the event was so lame to begin with.

Top Hits of 1979

2. Bad Girls, Donna Summer

3. Le Freak, Chic

4. Da Ya Think I'm Sexy, Rod Stewart

6. I Will Survive, Gloria Gaynor

7. Hot Stuff, Donna Summer

8. Y.M.C.A., Village People

9. Ring My Bell, Anita Ward

11. Too Much Heaven, Bee Gees

12. MacArthur Park, Donna Summer

16. Tragedy, Bee Gees

18. Heart Of Glass, Blondie

20. Good Times, Chic


Either your memory is faulty or you've blocked all this stuff out, Brian.

Daver
09-04-2003, 09:21 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
[QUOTE]

Oh, come on! A watershed event for the nation? Give me a break. It was a local radio promotion that got out of control because too many kids from Evergreen Park had nothing better to do on a weeknight and had been smokin' too much weed. Don't give these stoner punks more credit than they deserve. Half the people at the event don't even remember why or how they got there.

That "local radio promotion" reached national prominence in a matter of hours,it made the New York nightly news within an hour of the second game being called,at a time when all national news was based on the New York news,and it will be forever linked to the Chicago White Sox.

The shame associated with allowing it to happen is long gone,all that is left now is the nostalgia factor,and face it,it is something that people across the country still talk about,the White Sox not capitalizing on it truly shows how bassackwards their marketing skills really are.They would pack the ballpark to the rafters if they brought back the original cast of "Disco Demolition" for a repeat performance.

Hell PHG would show up just to ogle Lorelei................ :)

voodoochile
09-04-2003, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by Daver
Hell PHG would show up just to ogle Lorelei................ :)

Me 2 and I barely paid attention to the event when it happened. I can't remember which radio station I listened to back then. If memory serves, there were other classic rock stations at 95.5 (WMET as in DynaMet - I owned a few t-shirts) and 94.7.

Brian26
09-04-2003, 09:36 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
Either your memory is faulty or you've blocked all this stuff out, Brian.

Neither, I'm going off of something Lindberg wrote in one of his Sox books. He mentioned disco was already on the wane when Dahl pulled this stunt. I give you credit Cheeses...you did your homework. I would argue that disco was really on the wane in 1979 as I tend to think the disco yrs were '75-'79, but now I'm remembering "Disco Duck" maybe into 1980. I stand corrected.
I distinctly remember "celebration" after either the Pirates in '79 or the Phillies in '80 won the World Series.

cheeses_h_rice
09-04-2003, 09:44 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Neither, I'm going off of something Lindberg wrote in one of his Sox books. He mentioned disco was already on the wane when Dahl pulled this stunt. I give you credit Cheeses...you did your homework. I would argue that disco was really on the wane in 1979 as I tend to think the disco yrs were '75-'79, but now I'm remembering "Disco Duck" maybe into 1980. I stand corrected.
I distinctly remember "celebration" after either the Pirates in '79 or the Phillies in '80 won the World Series.

I think disco was at its biggest in 1977. "Saturday Night Fever" came out that year, and obviously when a huge hit movie like that makes such a cultural impact, it's probably all downhill from there. But as you can see from the chart figures I posted, there were still some huge hits in '79. Also, as my memory serves me, the Loop radio station really broke through in '78/'79 with their hard-rock/classic-rock format, so the culture clash there was huge. Dahl just happened to catch the gestalt.

voodoochile
09-04-2003, 09:49 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Neither, I'm going off of something Lindberg wrote in one of his Sox books. He mentioned disco was already on the wane when Dahl pulled this stunt. I give you credit Cheeses...you did your homework. I would argue that disco was really on the wane in 1979 as I tend to think the disco yrs were '75-'79, but now I'm remembering "Disco Duck" maybe into 1980. I stand corrected.
I distinctly remember "celebration" after either the Pirates in '79 or the Phillies in '80 won the World Series.

I thought that was "We Are Family" for the Pirates, or was that the first time in the early 70's?

Lip Man 1
09-04-2003, 09:52 PM
We Are Family / Sister Sledge was linked with the 79 Pirates.

Lip

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2003, 10:17 PM
Originally posted by Daver
....Hell PHG would show up just to ogle Lorelei................ :)

It goes without saying that you, me, and Brian would be at the Cell regardless. After all, we are Sox Fans. An opportunity to ogle Lorelei would be an added bonus. :smile:

Turning the White Sox into "the anti-disco" team (at least for one night) would be a GREAT way to draw some interest from people who aren't Sox Fans. Even more importantly, it would finally give the faceless, lifeless "other" MLB team playing in Chicago a public image that the rest of the nation would finally find memorable.

Who knows, they might actually want to visit that crazy ballpark where Disco Demolition happened (or at least the parking lot) next time they're in Chicago to attend a convention. There sure are lots of conventioneers already making pilgrimages to that pisshole the Cubune advertises. Why not go see that "anti-disco" team, too?

It goes without saying that the saga of the 1919 Sox and the plight of Joe Jackson strikes an even rawer nerve in the national psyche. Anything the Sox did to put top-spin on Disco Demolition could be done times-ten for the Black Sox scandal, too.

It's marketing, babe. :cool:

:gallas
"Marketing... hmm, yes.... I've heard that term used before, but I'm still unclear on what is involved. Can I keep Elvis and my half-price nights?"

:reinsy
"You mean I should do something to embrace the history of my 100+ year-old American League charter franchise? Boy, you Sox Fans *really are* crazy!!!"

TornLabrum
09-04-2003, 10:29 PM
As one who thinks rock died when the Beatles broke up (well, maybe I'm not that extreme) and a hater of disco and all it stoof for (such as bad groups like the BeeGees), but as one who has loved baseball from the tender age of five, I remember hating Steve Dahl and disco demolition because the idiot fans running on the field caused us to forfeit a game.

Since then I've:

1) Become a fan of Steve Dahl;
2) Used disco demolition in a trivia question that John Rooney used at SoxFest several years ago (long story how he got hole of my trivia quizzes, that I wrote for the ChiSox club, but it did result in my winning some great trashy prizes over the course of a few years);
3) Seen a reconciliation between the Sox and Dahl;
4) Heard Mike Veeck a couple of years ago say to a banquet audience, "If there's anyone I haven't personally apologized to for disco demolition...."
5) Decided that it's just one more episode in the wacky history of this franchise and is something to be embraced.

I'm glad that Dahl and the Sox got together yesterday to celebrate his 25 years in Chicago.

(I also happen to know that one of George's uncles was a huge Dahl fan, long before I was.)

flo-B-flo
09-04-2003, 11:46 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
[QUOTE]Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Instead of ignoring it, a savvy marketer (or P.R. organization) would embrace the event and spin it to their own advantage. For example, a "Disco Still Sucks" night with a disco-themed fireworks show and performers dressed in platform shoes, satin shirts, and afro wigs would garner the ballclub plenty of national publicity. [QUOTE]

I just don't think that would sell. No offense, PHG. Not saying I can do better than that, but even the Elvis night stuff is very forced and old at this point.

Why? Because the national media LOVES this sort of stuff. Their audience is comprised of the same people living coast to coast who know about disco music and would pique their curiosity to learn more about it and that crazy riot that ended it all. [QUOTE]

Do your homework, PHG. Disco was already dead by the time this riot happened. Disco had been on the decline for two years previous to this. That's one of the reasons the event was so lame to begin with.

The Sox have done NOTHING to remind people about Disco Demolition and yet it is still well-known and still draws more hits and inquisitive visitors to this website than any other single feature. That event is deep in the national vein--a watershed event for American pop culture in the 1970's--and you think it has no value to the Chicago White Sox? Come on! [QUOTE]

Oh, come on! A watershed event for the nation? Give me a break. It was a local radio promotion that got out of control because too many kids from Evergreen Park had nothing better to do on a weeknight and had been smokin' too much weed. Don't give these stoner punks more credit than they deserve. Half the people at the event don't even remember why or how they got there. I was there. I wasn't stoned. Disco was not dead yet. There were still BIG disco dancing contests for big money. Bars like"Blue Suede Shoes" in Hegewisch were still raking it $ in till at least 81. And thats not the point. the guys are absolutely correct. The marketing opportunity is there. Many of us thought it was funny. The Sox were sucking all year long. I was never scared after the game as with other harrowing times.

VeeckAsInWreck
09-05-2003, 01:42 AM
I hope that for next year, if the Sox have a home game on or around July 12, 2004. It would be perfect to have a "Disco Demolition II" or "Disco Appreciation Night" your choice on the title.
It would be nice to have Steve and Lorelei at the park or parking lot (your choice again) for the 25th anniversary. I just hope that everyone can stay in their seat this time! :D:

thepaulbowski
09-05-2003, 07:31 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
It's part of the history of the game and the Sox. Yeah, it was a crappy thing at the time, but now it is a funny annecdote from our checkered past.

Hiding from it is just lame...

Maybe twenty years from now we should have William Ligue night then, too.

LuvSox
09-05-2003, 07:51 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
If memory serves, there were other classic rock stations at 95.5 (WMET as in DynaMet - I owned a few t-shirts) and 94.7.

They weren't classic yet! :D:

PaleHoseGeorge
09-05-2003, 08:04 AM
Originally posted by LuvSox
They weren't classic yet! :D:

Exactly. Back then the format was called Album-oriented rock, or AOR for short. I never heard the term "classic" applied to the music until the late-80's/early-90's.

"Classic" must be one of the most misunderstood words in the English language. When someone uses the term "classic" it usually means "nobody has been able to improve on the formula since when this was new." :cool:

LuvSox
09-05-2003, 08:08 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
"Classic" must be one of the most misunderstood words in the English language. When someone uses the term "classic" it usually means "nobody has been able to improve on the formula since when this was new." :cool:


Classic also means "I've heard it a million times and can't take it anymore." :D:

KingXerxes
09-05-2003, 09:20 AM
Ever since Reinsdorf and Einhorn bought this team, they have made every effort humanly possibly to completely cut-off the past. The have caused an utter disconnect between the past twenty years, and the eighty years which preceded them.

It's no secret that I've been harping about their marketing efforts for the past years on these threads. They have completely blown it as evidenced by fan interest/attendance/media coverage. They have screwed it up on both a macro and micro level, and it makes you wonder exactly what their agenda is.

Should Disco Demolition be somehow memorialized? Absolutely. Not everything in life goes as planned, and this one great example of that. Not everything has to be scrubbed down, sanitized and presented in a squeaky clean fashion. Even when they try and connect to the past (e.g. The commercial where the child/father/grandfather are standing around talking about their favorite memories) it comes off unbelievably stilted and LAME.

Here's my idea for a commercial:

A husband and wife are sitting at their kitchen table, when a boy (around 18 years old) walks in and tells his dad that he's going to the White Sox Game with some of his buddies. As the mother looks up at him to answer, she flashes back to highlights of Dick Allen hitting a home run and says, "Have a good time", the father looks up, flashes back to a great Ken Berry catch and says, "Yeah have a good time", then the mother looks back up flashes back to the Disco Demolition mess and adds, "And behave yourself.", and then we switch back to the father who has also flashed back to Disco Demolition - but we see his flashback is of himself running around the field during the melee (I'm sure you could somehow superimpose a younger version of the father in this), and he looks back at his son and says, "Have a good time."

34 Inch Stick
09-05-2003, 09:51 AM
Brian, think of it like the way Salem, Massachusetts embraces its witch past. The Salem witch trials were a black eye in the city, commonwealth, and country's history. The helpless of society were prayed upon and put to death with no evidence.

Now, while the town appologizes for the incident, it also does everything it can to play up the history in an often lighthearted manner.

Chicago also highlights it's gangster past. Yet if we really looked at what those gangsters were all about we would be embarassed by the association.

A good marketer, given an event of good or bad renowned, can put a friendly spin on it and package it as something desireable.

davenicholson
09-05-2003, 09:51 AM
Originally posted by DrCrawdad
What's is (or what was) Blueline?
Doctor:

The Blueline WAS a very edgy magazine that a couple of Blackhawk fans put together and sold outside of The Stadium before Hawks games. $Bill wasn't too happy about it, and there were even lawsuits, as I recall. I have a couple of issues, including the gala final issue, and they are just plain hilarious, and the humor is definitely not always G (nor even PG) rated! Imagine some of the more outspoken and talented writers here at WSI putting their thoughts, together with doctored-up photos and cartoons on paper!

When The Blueline went under, they mainted their online version for awhile, which included a fan's board, much like this one, called Biscuit Babble. That is now gone, too, but the fan board lives on at http://www.biscuitbabble.com/forums/index.php?. I post and lurk there during the hockey season as Korab22--if you're a Hawks fan and especially if you hate their management as much as that of the Sox, I heartily recommend it!

voodoochile
09-05-2003, 11:29 AM
Originally posted by thepaulbowski
Maybe twenty years from now we should have William Ligue night then, too.

You are comparing an assault on a opposing coach that left him partially deaf in one ear to a night when a game got canceled because of a dumb promotion where no one got seriously hurt? Man, you need some perspective...

alohafri
09-05-2003, 12:25 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
Highly unlikely, Hangar. "Stever" ain't that cool.

Uh-oh, sounds like a Girlcow fan...

KingXerxes
09-05-2003, 12:34 PM
As a longtime Chicago radio listener I have to tell you how funny I find it that Steve Dahl seems to be morphing into exactly what he used to condemn years ago.

He is slowly but surely becoming the Clark Webber or Wally Phillips of Chicago Radio. Is he cool? I don't know, if you're 50 then yes, if you're 20 I doubt it.

Brian26
09-05-2003, 12:40 PM
Originally posted by alohafri
Uh-oh, sounds like a Girlcow fan...

Not at all.

Mancow's a dueche.

King summed it up beautifully. I'm a fan of 1987 Steve Dahl. Stever just doesn't entertain me anymore. I've listened through the Grobstein debacle on MVP, the Lane and Laura years, and periodically through the Joy and Dave years, and now the Wendy and Buzz years. None of it compares to classic 80's Steve and Garry, not even close.

It wouldn't surprise me to see Steve show up on WGN sometime after his CKG contract expires. He truly has morphed into everything he ever complained about.

Listening to Stever talk about how much food he ate last night while pushing HDTV crap down your throat isn't entertaining. Is he doing that "spin the wheel" gimmick still for the callers? That's the epitome of WGN radio. I love the fact that the same three women still call him everyday and say they're new callers.

A.T. Money
09-05-2003, 12:41 PM
As much as I like your commerical idea KingXerxes, it's never going to fly because of all the trouble with fans on the field lately.

Good concept though. :D:

KingXerxes
09-05-2003, 12:53 PM
The last time I ever listened to Steve Dahl (about ten years ago) - he wasn't even on the air.

Harry Shearer was filling in for Dahl all week - and doing a fantastic job (a very talented guy to say the least) - but on the last day, Shearer got a call from Dahl's incredibly annoying and meddlesome wife (name escapes me - but the show would just tank when she got on).

It seems that the Dahl's were on vacation in Michigan, and able to hear Shearer's broadcast, and poor poor Steve felt that Shearer was somehow disrespecting him. That was all I ever needed to hear from that baby again. I'll admit it was tempting to tune in when Meier told him to shove it, but I didn't do it. Dahl has been pretty lame for quite a while now - IMHO. I think it started when he began talking to his family on the air, and acting like anybody other than himself and some housefraus out in the western burbs really gave a damn about his kids getting into a fight that his wife had to break up and then yell about for 30 minutes.

Hangar18
09-05-2003, 12:55 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
I think you're missing the point. The fact is was bush, minor league, and never to be glorified is sooooooo beyond the point. From a marketing standpoint, you must deal with it precisely because IT HAPPENED. There is nothing the Sox can do to go back and erase it.

Instead of ignoring it, a savvy marketer (or P.R. organization) would embrace the event and spin it to their own advantage. For example, a "Disco Still Sucks" night with a disco-themed fireworks show and performers dressed in platform shoes, satin shirts, and afro wigs would garner the ballclub plenty of national publicity. Why? Because the national media LOVES this sort of stuff. Their audience is comprised of the same people living coast to coast who know about disco music and would pique their curiosity to learn more about it and that crazy riot that ended it all. The Sox have done NOTHING to remind people about Disco Demolition and yet it is still well-known and still draws more hits and inquisitive visitors to this website than any other single feature. That event is deep in the national vein--a watershed event for American pop culture in the 1970's--and you think it has no value to the Chicago White Sox? Come on!

Instead of embracing what they alone can capitalize on, the White Sox marketing department runs away from Disco Demolition as though their hair was on fire. There is maybe one event per decade that can be tied so definitively to a team's history, and fewer still that can stir nationwide nostalgia. The Sox are IDIOTS for not recognizing what the hell they are sitting on.

Frankly, I'm not surprised at their ignorance in the least.

****ing idiots ---------> :reinsy :gallas

Im not saying this to be a kiss-up, but this Response SHOULD BE FRAMED AND SENT TO THE SOX MARKETING DEPT. Excellent Point. Had this been the cubs, they wouldve Done Exactly as PHG already noted. Hell, if they didnt Cub Apologist/Marketer/GM/ MIKE KILEY wouldve gotten the ball started by IMPLYING THESE THINGS IN HIS daily CubPoganda
reports.

JC456
09-05-2003, 01:04 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
It goes without saying that you, me, and Brian would be at the Cell regardless. After all, we are Sox Fans. An opportunity to ogle Lorelei would be an added bonus. :smile:

Turning the White Sox into "the anti-disco" team (at least for one night) would be a GREAT way to draw some interest from people who aren't Sox Fans. Even more importantly, it would finally give the faceless, lifeless "other" MLB team playing in Chicago a public image that the rest of the nation would finally find memorable.

Who knows, they might actually want to visit that crazy ballpark where Disco Demolition happened (or at least the parking lot) next time they're in Chicago to attend a convention. There sure are lots of conventioneers already making pilgrimages to that pisshole the Cubune advertises. Why not go see that "anti-disco" team, too?

It goes without saying that the saga of the 1919 Sox and the plight of Joe Jackson strikes an even rawer nerve in the national psyche. Anything the Sox did to put top-spin on Disco Demolition could be done times-ten for the Black Sox scandal, too.


Maybe Reinsdorf an Einhorn could maybe make a statement that two former Sox players ought to be exonerated for 1919, Joe Jackson and Buck Weaver, since the rules they were banned on in 1921 were not the rules when the series took place in 1919. And neither of whom participated in throwing the series. I think that would say a lot to many Sox fans. It would for me!

Hangar18
09-05-2003, 01:20 PM
Originally posted by Brian26


He truly has morphed into everything he ever complained about.



I say Steve is "Cool" for the fact that hes a SOX FAN, something the Media doesnt regard as "Cool". To be a sox fan is to be a trailblazer, to walk off the beaten path. We dont do what "everyone else is doing". As for him "morphing", your probably right. The most famous person to have his Career MORPH before our eyes, was none other than Harry Caray. This was a guy who was a very articulate astute announcer while with the Cardinals. He came to the SOX and became Rebellious, Acid-tongued, and would Call Things Like He Saw Them, something Sox fans LOVED and Management Loathed. When he was asked by Reins/Einhorn to tone it down and Become A COMPANY MAN, he told them to Jam It. He left the Sox, Was hired by the cubs almost Immediately (cubs have always been in the Sox/MLB trash) and Promptly Became THE BEST CUB COMPANY MAN
IN THEIR HISTORY. He messed names up, drivelled off subjects, was unaware of game situations, but still was Cartoonish enough for the CubPoganda Machine to ELEVATE HIM TO SuperCub Status, and the Lemmings bought it. Heck, so did the Media. The media gave him Presidential status in this town, which made More Lemmings like him even more, and well...
you see where this is going. He Morphed pretty good himself.

34 Inch Stick
09-05-2003, 03:31 PM
Originally posted by KingXerxes
As a longtime Chicago radio listener I have to tell you how funny I find it that Steve Dahl seems to be morphing into exactly what he used to condemn years ago.

He is slowly but surely becoming the Clark Webber or Wally Phillips of Chicago Radio. Is he cool? I don't know, if you're 50 then yes, if you're 20 I doubt it.

King, just to start off, I am closer to 20 than I am to 50 and I still am a big fan. A couple of years ago I would have agreed with your statement. The Joy and Dave years were the absolute low point of his broadcasting days. I thought he was becoming the woman from Tinley Park the way he let those two stiffs shape his broadcast.

However since Buzz came on he has been back to great radio (not quite late 80's edge but still great).

As far as him talking about his sons well, one is 22, so he has been doing that for a while. Janet is occasionally annoying, but you also get classic moments like the Christmas decoration call from years past.

It is tough to be anti establishment when you are suburban, 50, married with kids and wealthy. He is still funny though.

As for cool. I used to think DJ's were cool when i was a kid. When I got to see what these people actually look like and what they are it was like the man behind the curtain in the Wizard of Oz. I don't know if there is a cool one among them.

TommyJohn
09-05-2003, 11:05 PM
Originally posted by KingXerxes
Ever since Reinsdorf and Einhorn bought this team, they have made every effort humanly possibly to completely cut-off the past. The have caused an utter disconnect between the past twenty years, and the eighty years which preceded them.

It's no secret that I've been harping about their marketing efforts for the past years on these threads. They have completely blown it as evidenced by fan interest/attendance/media coverage. They have screwed it up on both a macro and micro level, and it makes you wonder exactly what their agenda is.

Should Disco Demolition be somehow memorialized? Absolutely. Not everything in life goes as planned, and this one great example of that. Not everything has to be scrubbed down, sanitized and presented in a squeaky clean fashion. Even when they try and connect to the past (e.g. The commercial where the child/father/grandfather are standing around talking about their favorite memories) it comes off unbelievably stilted and LAME.

Here's my idea for a commercial:

A husband and wife are sitting at their kitchen table, when a boy (around 18 years old) walks in and tells his dad that he's going to the White Sox Game with some of his buddies. As the mother looks up at him to answer, she flashes back to highlights of Dick Allen hitting a home run and says, "Have a good time", the father looks up, flashes back to a great Ken Berry catch and says, "Yeah have a good time", then the mother looks back up flashes back to the Disco Demolition mess and adds, "And behave yourself.", and then we switch back to the father who has also flashed back to Disco Demolition - but we see his flashback is of himself running around the field during the melee (I'm sure you could somehow superimpose a younger version of the father in this), and he looks back at his son and says, "Have a good time."


I remember 1990, when the Sox made those "last year in old
Comiskey Park" commercials. Steve Dahl did a spot where he
said "do you know me? I've broken more records in Comiskey
Park than anyone. Really."

PaleHoseGeorge
09-06-2003, 06:18 AM
Originally posted by TommyJohn
I remember 1990, when the Sox made those "last year in old
Comiskey Park" commercials. Steve Dahl did a spot where he
said "do you know me? I've broken more records in Comiskey
Park than anyone. Really."

Good memory, Tommy. I had forgotten about those. There were a whole series of commercials on various topics. I'm wondering if the Sox have demonstrated even one-tenth as much wit to capitalize on Disco Demolition since? That was 13 years ago.

:?:

PaleHoseGeorge
09-08-2003, 09:34 AM
Thanks to Medford Bobby who sent me the file, everyone can now hear the audio clip from last week's Steve Dahl radio show giving props to White Sox Interactive and our Disco Demolition page. You can listen to it by visiting the Disco Demolition page. I converted the file to an easy-to-hear RealAudio file and uploaded it to the site last night.

"It's a pretty good renegade White Sox fan site." (http://whitesoxinteractive.com/History&Glory/DiscoDemolition.htm)

Enjoy!

:bandance:

DrCrawdad
09-08-2003, 10:02 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Thanks to Medford Bobby who sent me the file, everyone can now hear the audio clip from last week's Steve Dahl radio show giving props to White Sox Interactive and our Disco Demolition page. You can listen to it by visiting the Disco Demolition page. I converted the file to an easy-to-hear RealAudio file and uploaded it to the site last night.

"It's a pretty good renegade White Sox fan site." (http://whitesoxinteractive.com/History&Glory/DiscoDemolition.htm)

Enjoy!

:bandance:

Great job George!

As a longtime listener (one though who hasn't been able to listen in the last year) it's cool to hear Steve's comments on the site.

When Steve was interviewed by DJ, Steve said that he still has his season tickets.

ode to veeck
09-08-2003, 12:56 PM
Exactly. Back then the format was called Album-oriented rock, or AOR for short. I never heard the term "classic" applied to the music until the late-80's/early-90's.

WXRT used the term "classic rock" as the preeminent description of their format at least as early as the mid 70s

PaleHoseGeorge
09-08-2003, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by ode to veeck
WXRT used the term "classic rock" as the preeminent description of their format at least as early as the mid 70s

Actually, you're thinking of their tagline "Chicago's Finest Rock," which also coincided with the now ubiquitous diamond logo. Before this (in the 1970's) they used the tagline "Chicago's Fine Rock Station," a play on WFMT's "Chicago's Fine Classics Station." To underscore the point, 'XRT used to toss in a few classical pieces into their programming mix, Bach, Beethoven, etc. They also bragged endlessly about how they never used tape for either their music or commercials. It was all high-fidelity vinyl records (we're talking the 70's here) and live-spoken deejay commercials--just like WFMT.

Boy, what a granola period that was!

:)

ode to veeck
09-08-2003, 01:27 PM
PHG,

Actually, WXRT's motto/logo as "Chicago's Fine Rock Station" came later, (early 80s?) and replaced the "Classic Rock Station" moniker which preceeded it for several years.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-08-2003, 02:10 PM
Originally posted by ode to veeck
PHG,

Actually, WXRT's motto/logo as "Chicago's Fine Rock Station" came later, (early 80s?) and replaced the "Classic Rock Station" moniker which preceeded it for several years.

Well, we're never settle this dispute unless somebody can dig up a 70's- vintage WXRT "Featured Artist" card. I'm just dumb enough to probably have one tucked inside some old college textbook of mine. I'm also too lazy to go find it. :smile:

I'm sure I'm not the only one who remembers those cards. They used to have STACKS of them by the cash register inside Hegewisch Records, right next to copies of The Illinois Entertainer.

And don't forget Hegewisch for all your head shop needs, too!

:)

cheeses_h_rice
09-08-2003, 02:51 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Well, we're never settle this dispute unless somebody can dig up a 70's- vintage WXRT "Featured Artist" card. I'm just dumb enough to probably have one tucked inside some old college textbook of mine. I'm also too lazy to go find it. :smile:

I'm sure I'm not the only one who remembers those cards. They used to have STACKS of them by the cash register inside Hegewisch Records, right next to copies of The Illinois Entertainer.

And don't forget Hegewisch for all your head shop needs, too!

:)

PHG, while I still have a few dozen WLS and WCFL surveys going back to about 1973, I think I got rid of my 'XRT cards somewhere along the way. I actually have no memory of WXRT pre-1981, when my family moved back to the Chicago area after being gone for a few years, but I understand it was a legitimately free-form rock station in the early '70s. By 1981 it had become "Chicago's Finest Rock."

And are you talking about the Hegewisch on Roosevelt Road in Villa Park or thereabouts? If so, I used to go there tons; I was such a music junkie, that my travels often took me to such fine establishments as Looney Tunes Records in Lombard, Beautiful Day in LaGrange, the Rose Records on Ogden in Downers Grove, Flipside in Lombard, and let's not forget Laury's Records in Deerfield, where I bought my first album (Kiss: Love Gun) and 45 (Kansas: Carry on Wayward Son).

:gulp:

voodoochile
09-08-2003, 03:15 PM
I thought the first station to use the classic rock slogan was WCKG 105.9.

davenicholson
09-08-2003, 03:37 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge

I'm sure I'm not the only one who remembers those cards. They used to have STACKS of them by the cash register inside Hegewisch Records, right next to copies of The Illinois Entertainer.

And don't forget Hegewisch for all your head shop needs, too!

:)
PHG,
NOW you've triggered some memories! :?: You must be talking of the original Hegewisch Records in, umm, Hegewisch, right? Albums were $3 or 4/$10, no cash register, just a LARGE man sitting on a bar stool near the door with w fistful of dollars and some change on the counter next to him. Receipt? I don't need any stinkin' receipt! Ahh, I can smell the aroma of strawberry incense wafting through my limbic system now... There's a little history of the chain here (http://www.midwestbeat.com/ezine/march2003/soap.htm), if you're interested.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-08-2003, 04:13 PM
Originally posted by davenicholson
PHG,
NOW you've triggered some memories! :?: You must be talking of the original Hegewisch Records in, umm, Hegewisch, right? Albums were $3 or 4/$10, no cash register, just a LARGE man sitting on a bar stool near the door with w fistful of dollars and some change on the counter next to him. Receipt? I don't need any stinkin' receipt! Ahh, I can smell the aroma of strawberry incense wafting through my limbic system now... There's a little history of the chain here (http://www.midwestbeat.com/ezine/march2003/soap.htm), if you're interested.

Yeah, that's the one! It may still be there. Burnham Avenue someplace north of 147th St. They opened another in Richton Park in the early-80's, but the original store was much better. I distinctly remember buying new vinyl by Son Seals, Lonnie Brooks, and Spyra Gyra there back in the summer of 1980. It was a big deal to shop that awesome store and their H-U-G-E selection because all through high school I used to shop Heights Records on Halsted Street (where the Tender Trap is today). That was another joint that offered "cash discounts" to screw Uncle Sam. :smile:

Buying (legitimate) music has gotten so corporate the last 20 years, especially since Tower Records, Best Buy, and Walmart started dominating industry sales. No wonder the music business is in such a shambles today. If you want that "dirty" feeling, you have to go to a file-sharing service--not that I would ever suggest or recommend anything so illegal!

:)

ode to veeck
09-08-2003, 07:27 PM
wow Headwich records as we used to call it, forgot all about it-

Daver
09-08-2003, 08:07 PM
Originally posted by ode to veeck
wow Headwich records as we used to call it, forgot all about it-

Whoa....an Ode sighting.......

I thought perhaps you got eaten by an Elk........


:)

WinningUgly!
09-08-2003, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
and let's not forget Laury's Records in Deerfield, where I bought my first album (Kiss: Love Gun)

Good stuff! http://www.themorlocks.com/talk/images/smiles/gene.gif

ode to veeck
09-08-2003, 10:07 PM
Whoa....an Ode sighting.......

No, just been traveling alot or working 90 hrs a week

davenicholson
09-08-2003, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Yeah, that's the one! It may still be there. Burnham Avenue someplace north of 147th St. They opened another in Richton Park in the early-80's, but the original store was much better.

George,

Sadly, the last Hegewisch location closed, according to the article. But also according to the article do you remember: Hegewisch Records also sponsored most of those memorable Hammond Civic Center shows of the 70s and early 80s, making it possible for young Region rockers to experience live concerts by such hard rock icons of the era as Rush, Blue Oyster Cult, Alvin Lee, Molly Hatchet, Robin Trower, Mahogany Rush, Judas Priest, Roadmaster and Cheap Trick, to name but a few. any of those shows? I remember (well, sorta remember) seeing Robin Trower (c. 1973?) with some friends at the "accoustically imperfect" Hammond Civic Center--you could hardly see the stage through the haze of pot smoke. The music was so overwhelming that I remember crying tears of joy--no, wait. Maybe it was from the smoke... :whiner: Hey, who knows: maybe we might have shared a doo-bwah or two as they got passed down the aisle, had either of us ever done that sort of thing, that is!

PaleHoseGeorge
09-08-2003, 10:54 PM
Originally posted by davenicholson
George,

Sadly, the last Hegewisch location closed, according to the article. But also according to the article do you remember: any of those shows? I remember (well, sorta remember) seeing Robin Trower (c. 1973?) with some friends at the "accoustically imperfect" Hammond Civic Center--you could hardly see the stage through the haze of pot smoke. The music was so overwhelming that I remember crying tears of joy--no, wait. Maybe it was from the smoke... :whiner: Hey, who knows: maybe we might have shared a doo-bwah or two as they got passed down the aisle, had either of us ever done that sort of thing, that is!

I never went to the Hammond Civic Center, but my first-ever rock concert was Robin Trower at the International Amphitheater (1977). :smile:

I also owned albums by Mahogany Rush, Molly Hatchet, and Cheap Trick. I wasn't half the metal head some of my friends were. Those guys had all those records--and plenty more too. :cool: