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Streets
08-09-2003, 03:06 PM
What's with this 'he gone' thing that Hawk is using for strikeouts?? I've been watching games all summer but I'm just now noticing this, when did it start?

JJAustin69
08-09-2003, 03:14 PM
It has slowly developed over time. From "GAS, He's gone." over the years to "He's gone" which brings us to "HE GAWN." I think it started sometime in May but I am not for sure.

npdempse
08-09-2003, 05:51 PM
I have yet to actually hear Hawk drop the "s" from "he's." Though if he occasionally does, I suppose he's just making up for the fact that DJ always adds an "s" to "all": "Alls the Sox have to do is score 5 runs..."

MikeKreevich
08-09-2003, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by Streets
What's with this 'he gone' thing that Hawk is using for strikeouts?? I've been watching games all summer but I'm just now noticing this, when did it start?
What's the matter, You missing "Grab Some Bench"?

rmusacch
08-09-2003, 06:31 PM
Originally posted by npdempse
I have yet to actually hear Hawk drop the "s" from "he's." Though if he occasionally does, I suppose he's just making up for the fact that DJ always adds an "s" to "all": "Alls the Sox have to do is score 5 runs..."

I can't remember the last time he didn't drop the s.

Lip Man 1
08-09-2003, 07:03 PM
Hawk stopped using "grab some bench" in the early 90's after he and Kent Hrbek got into a shouting match.

Hrbek had hit a home run and as he was touching home plate looked up to the TV booth and started screaming at Harrelson.


Kent (and apparently other players) heard about Hawk's line every time they struck out and got tired of it.

Lip

sox_fan_forever
08-10-2003, 12:04 AM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
Hawk stopped using "grab some bench" in the early 90's after he and Kent Hrbek got into a shouting match.


That can't be right. I've only really been following the Sox for the past 3-4 years and I can remember hearing him say "grab some bench" on a number of occasions.

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 12:16 AM
"He gone" is just one of those natural Southernisms wherein words, possessives, and plurals are dropped; very common examples of the sort would be the greeting, "How you?" and the usage of the singular "mile" in place of miles--"His farm is seven mile down the road" etc., etc. Hawk's just bein' true to his roots.

inta
08-10-2003, 12:22 AM
what was his one main catchphrase he used when he and drysdale were in the booth in the 80's?

i can't remember for the life of me, but i remember it drove my dad nuts to the point he'd turn the radio on and mute the tv.

MHOUSE
08-10-2003, 01:04 AM
I want "GAS, he's gone. He'll grab some bench and we'll be back." But now it's some ghetto ebonics like "HE GAWN. Loaiza straight up dropped that foo fer sheezle right fiziesty one?" DJ is whiter than Hawk sometimes. :D:

Thunderstruck30
08-10-2003, 01:13 AM
Alot of times Hawk says "Hes gotta sinch it up and hunker down."
Anyone know what this means? It makes no sense at all to me.

MHOUSE
08-10-2003, 01:19 AM
Originally posted by Thunderstruck30
Alot of times Hawk says "Hes gotta sinch it up and hunker down."
Anyone know what this means? It makes no sense at all to me.

When you find out, also find out what a "hang wiffem" is and also a "catbird seat".

lostinlife28
08-10-2003, 03:16 AM
"Hes gotta sinch it up and hunker down."...old war saying. when in a trench soldiers would say sinch it up( reference to tightening up your cheeks so to speak) and hunker down. He uses it when a pitcher is in a bad spot and needs to just calm down and do the job.

WhiteSox = Life
08-10-2003, 05:32 AM
Originally posted by MHOUSE
When you find out, also find out what a "hang wiffem" is and also a "catbird seat".

"Hang wif'em" is "hang with them," which is used after a batter hits a ball very hard but right to a fielder. So, "hang with them," as in hang with those line drives (keep hitting them) and you'll start getting hits.

"Catbird seat" is used when a hitter has the count in his favor, e.g. 2-0, 2-1, 3-1. What the hitter wants to do is see the pitch and hit it; like when a cat is seated with a bird right in front of him and all the cat has to do is attack and he's got himself a tasty meal. It basically means, the batter is in good position for a hit.

Life-Style

MikeKreevich
08-10-2003, 08:25 AM
"He's gotta bow his neck here."
Hawk uses this expression usually when a batter has two strikes during an improtant at bat.
My quess is, this expression refers to a draught horse who has to pull a heavy load and puts his head down and bows his neck to get ready for that first pull. Just a guess.

Nick@Nite
08-10-2003, 09:13 AM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
Hawk stopped using "grab some bench" in the early 90's after he and Kent Hrbek got into a shouting match.

Hrbek had hit a home run and as he was touching home plate looked up to the TV booth and started screaming at Harrelson.


Kent (and apparently other players) heard about Hawk's line every time they struck out and got tired of it.

Lip

In Hrbek's case, Hawk shouldn't have said "grab some bench"... he should have said "grab a donut".

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 10:03 AM
Originally posted by WhiteSox = Life
Life-Style [/B]

To be "in the catbird seat" drifted over into baseball via Red Barber and is another Southernism reflecting the old belief that because catbirds tend to perch highest in the trees (this is true) they were on the top of the pecking order--so to speak--among the birds. Thus, to be "in the catbird seat" is to be on top of things, in control, etc., etc.

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by MHOUSE
I want "GAS, he's gone. He'll grab some bench and we'll be back." But now it's some ghetto ebonics like "HE GAWN. Loaiza straight up dropped that foo fer sheezle right fiziesty one?" DJ is whiter than Hawk sometimes. :D:

Whether the use of the non-possessive in Southern white speech "comes from" the speech patterns of black slaves is a debated issue--there were also some areas of the British Isles which used the same sort of thing in their speech. Whatever the case, it sure isn't "ghetto ebonics."

My question--when did Hawk start using this "stretch!" business for every long fly ball the Sox hit

MHOUSE
08-10-2003, 12:38 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
My question--when did Hawk start using this "stretch!" business for every long fly ball the Sox hit

That was earlier this year. I don't mind it now and then, but for a while it was like every fly ball was "C'mon stretch, stretch." But he's better about it now. I haven't heard ducksnort as much lately and "Get down.....it will." He still uses "right size wrong shape" a lot. I wanna hear "I love it when you analyze" and DJ's "mmm hmmm".

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 02:03 PM
First, someone ought to put together a CD of "Hawkisms" much like the one put out for Nancy Faust. Secondly, write to Hawk & DJ on the Fox Sports Net Chicago website, and hopefully we'll get an answer.

Here's a link to the site... (http://www.fsnchicago.com/index.php)

SoxFan76
08-10-2003, 02:03 PM
stretch was used last year, and hes gone has been used for awhile i thought. i dont care, i love hawk. when they have the home team announcers on ESPN during the highlights, it just shows how much better hawk is compared to everyone else. he is the only announcer who shows emotion. especially chip and steve. those guys have zero personality. but of course that is biased.

me and my uncle always do this great hawk line:

"well DJ, we got some email. i love email"

DJ:"i know you do"

and then there is "wed like to welcome all our viewers with comcast cable in rockford illinois. rockford.....yes."

stay fair, it will. split em! split em! i could go on forever.

Konerkoholic
08-10-2003, 07:38 PM
One thing I hate that Hawk says is "wrong man" on EVERY ground ball hit to Omar Vizquel or another great defensive player.
On the other hand, I love the way Hawk finishes White Sox wins. A simple "YES!" is the best call in sports.