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cheeses_h_rice
08-06-2003, 12:13 AM
So I was sitting in section 335 tonight, courtesy of a work acquaintance of my wife's, and had the best chances of getting a foul ball I've ever had at new Comiskey. Apparently one ball hit the seat I was to sit in in the first inning just before we arrived. Then another ball landed in my row about 5 seats away from me. And lastly, just after we had gotten food, and my lap was filled up, with a kosher dog in one tray, and another tray with big pools of ketchup and mustard on it, someone on the Royals loops a foul ball right to my row, one seat away from me. All of us had food on our laps -- nachos, dogs, etc. -- and we all just froze. If I hadn't had so much delicately-balanced food to deal with, I so easily could have reached out and grabbed the ball on its arc downward. Instead, we all sort of panicked and just sat there. it hit a girl in our party on the side/butt, bounced back, and a little girl behind us grabbed it.

Man. Talk about bad timing. Those darned condiments.

One of these days, I'll get a ball at Comiskey. One of these days.

:)

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 12:19 AM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
So I was sitting in section 335 tonight, courtesy of a work acquaintance of my wife's, and had the best chances of getting a foul ball I've ever had at new Comiskey. Apparently one ball hit the seat I was to sit in in the first inning just before we arrived. Then another ball landed in my row about 5 seats away from me. And lastly, just after we had gotten food, and my lap was filled up, with a kosher dog in one tray, and another tray with big pools of ketchup and mustard on it, someone on the Royals loops a foul ball right to my row, one seat away from me. All of us had food on our laps -- nachos, dogs, etc. -- and we all just froze. If I hadn't had so much delicately-balanced food to deal with, I so easily could have reached out and grabbed the ball on its arc downward. Instead, we all sort of panicked and just sat there. it hit a girl in our party on the side/butt, bounced back, and a little girl behind us grabbed it.

Man. Talk about bad timing. Those darned condiments.

One of these days, I'll get a ball at Comiskey. One of these days.

:)

That'll teach ya to put ketchup on a hot dog!

cheeses_h_rice
08-06-2003, 12:21 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
That'll teach ya to put ketchup on a hot dog!

Who says I did? The tray was a "just in case" because our hosts bought us food and didn't know what we'd want on our dogs.

I'm a mustard-only guy, at least at the ballpark.

:)

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 12:23 AM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
Who says I did? The tray was a "just in case" because our hosts bought us food and didn't know what we'd want on our dogs.

I'm a mustard-only guy, at least at the ballpark.

:)

Okay, that'll teach you to think anyone else would put ketchup on a hot dog!

doublem23
08-06-2003, 12:36 AM
No ketchup on your hot dog? Go back to Russia!

:)

Seriously, though, any good hot dog requires mustard, ketchup, diced tomatoes, diced onions (though I can't have them because they will make me violently ill), relish, a pickle, hot peppers, and celery salt. I think that's it.

valposoxfan
08-06-2003, 01:17 AM
Ketchup absolutely does NOT belong on a hot dog...under any circumstance... :smile:

Bucktown
08-06-2003, 01:27 AM
Originally posted by valposoxfan
Ketchup absolutely does NOT belong on a hot dog...under any circumstance... :smile:
I second that.

Nellie_Fox
08-06-2003, 01:39 AM
I've always fought that little bit of Chicago snobbery. Born and raised in the Chicago area (okay, Maywood and LaGrange, but still...) I've always put both ketchup and mustard on my hotdogs. I like the way it tastes, and I refuse to let someone tell me how I have to eat my hotdogs in order to be a real Chicagoan. I do like a little dash of celery salt on my dogs though, and I don't think anyone outside of Chicago would ever think of that.

doublem23
08-06-2003, 02:15 AM
Celery salt on a hot dog is heaven. :smile:

inta
08-06-2003, 02:33 AM
Originally posted by Bucktown
I second that.

i third that.

ketchup belongs on potatoes, not hot dogs.
may as well put mayo on there too
or bacon and cheese.

:o:

SoxFanDan
08-06-2003, 03:24 AM
I have learned thru my terrible food experiences at my fraternity that Ketchup makes everything good

jortafan
08-06-2003, 03:49 AM
Originally posted by inta
i third that.

ketchup belongs on potatoes, not hot dogs.
may as well put mayo on there too
or bacon and cheese.

:o:

Be careful what you joke about. I've heard of Southerners (south of Mason-Dixon, not Roosevelt Road) who put mayonaise on hot dogs, and get shocked when they learn not everyone does it.

Personally, I find the thought revolting, almost as much as the thought of ketchup/catsup on a hot dog.

hose
08-06-2003, 05:42 AM
If you boil a couple of Oscar Mayers at home, putting ketchup on doesn't make a difference.....not much flavor to begin with.

A good quality dog such as a Wolfy's, Fluky's, Superdawg, or even a Comiskey hot dog / kosher need to be ketchup free.

Jimmy's on Grand Ave.doesn't carry any ketchup , so it's not even an option.

hose
08-06-2003, 05:45 AM
Biggest joke in the hot dog business is in Los Angeles.

Der Wienerscnitchel, which is a chain of hot dog stands that are about as bad as hot dogs get.

LA is a burger town.

LuvSox
08-06-2003, 08:20 AM
Grape jelly. No, that was another thread.


Dogs need tomato, green pepper & onion.

Mmmm, hot dogs

Paulwny
08-06-2003, 08:33 AM
Texas hot sauce !!!!!

soxrme
08-06-2003, 08:36 AM
Originally posted by doublem23
No ketchup on your hot dog? Go back to Russia!

:)

Seriously, though, any good hot dog requires mustard, ketchup, diced tomatoes, diced onions (though I can't have them because they will make me violently ill), relish, a pickle, hot peppers, and celery salt. I think that's it.
ketchup does not ever belong on a hot dog. It is anti-american to do that. And you forgot the celery salt :cool:

gosox41
08-06-2003, 08:43 AM
Originally posted by doublem23
No ketchup on your hot dog? Go back to Russia!

:)

Seriously, though, any good hot dog requires mustard, ketchup, diced tomatoes, diced onions (though I can't have them because they will make me violently ill), relish, a pickle, hot peppers, and celery salt. I think that's it.

I think it was in the movie "Sudden Impact" where Clint Eastwood said something (and I'm paraphrasing) like:

"You know what really bothers me? It's not the murders, rapes, and attacks. It's not seeing all the dead bodies. It's putting ketchup on hot dogs. Nobody....and I mean nobody should be doing that"

I'm just repeating the quote as I remember it, but it was pretty funny...and true.

Next people will be telling me they put mayo on their corned beef sandwiches and eat them on white bread.

:)

Bob

hold2dibber
08-06-2003, 08:52 AM
Originally posted by SoxFanDan
I have learned thru my terrible food experiences at my fraternity that Ketchup makes everything good

That's the secret of South Side Irish "cooking"!

I have an uncle who puts ketchup on virtually everything edible - every meat (including chicken), eggs, cottage cheese (!), you name it. When he was a kid he ate ketchup and relish sandwiches.

adsit
08-06-2003, 08:55 AM
No serious hotdog stand in Boston (as opposed to places like White Hen- yes, they have 'em here) has ketchup on the counter. Chili, sweet relish, chopped onion, brown mustard... that's how I pick them up in Newmarket Square. Even the "Fenway Frank," served on those folded Wonder-bread looking buns they have up here, skips the ketchup.

A side note to travelers: "Chicago-style" hot dogs, like "Chicago-style" pizza, are to be avoided at all costs outside of Chicagoland. Meanwhile, at home, I make 'em the way Mama Portillo taught me :D: .

Paulwny
08-06-2003, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by hold2dibber
That's the secret of South Side Irish "cooking"!

I have an uncle who puts ketchup on virtually everything edible - every meat (including chicken), eggs, cottage cheese (!), you name it. When he was a kid he ate ketchup and relish sandwiches.

I have a brother-inlaw who is similar to your uncle. I've seen him put ketchup on his turkey on Thanksgiving. His wife noticed that he rarely at sweets and then realized he was satisfying his need for sugar by using ketchup. Is your uncle a sweets eater?

Procol Harum
08-06-2003, 09:34 AM
Originally posted by jortafan
Be careful what you joke about. I've heard of Southerners (south of Mason-Dixon, not Roosevelt Road) who put mayonaise on hot dogs, and get shocked when they learn not everyone does it.

Personally, I find the thought revolting, almost as much as the thought of ketchup/catsup on a hot dog.

Yep, I have seen that on occasion. I can remember my NC Mamaw When I was a kid (back in the '60s) puttin' mayo on her hot dog--that is a revolting, revolting memory. On the other hand, I don't think it's very widespread in the South--she was born before 1900 so had some pretty different tastes. While I'm a big fan of Chicago-style dogs, I also have quite a fondness for "Carolina-style" dogs: chili and cole slaw. The hot dog is a versatile venue for food consumption and should not be limited to one, dogmatic "right" interpretive scheme. That said....ketchup is a pretty lame way to go for a hot dog... :smile:

Procol Harum
08-06-2003, 09:37 AM
Originally posted by gosox41
Next people will be telling me they put mayo on their corned beef sandwiches and eat them on white bread.
Bob

The thought of corned beef with anything, for any reason, is a distressing proposition.

Mighty4
08-06-2003, 09:38 AM
The heck with the Ketchup/Catsup thing, what about the girls' butt that got hit with the ball? How was that? Those are the buns we should be talking about here.

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 09:42 AM
Originally posted by jortafan
Be careful what you joke about. I've heard of Southerners (south of Mason-Dixon, not Roosevelt Road) who put mayonaise on hot dogs, and get shocked when they learn not everyone does it.

Personally, I find the thought revolting, almost as much as the thought of ketchup/catsup on a hot dog.

PBS has shown a show about hot dogs around the country, including a few Chicago places, and one of the more interesting condiments put on hot dogs was down south in Georgia or someplace. They put cole slaw on their dogs.

Growing up in Kankakee there was an A&W stand where they put a meat sauce (not chili) on their dogs. Not as good as a Chicago dog, but better than a chili dog if that's possible.

Iwritecode
08-06-2003, 09:43 AM
Originally posted by valposoxfan
Ketchup absolutely does NOT belong on a hot dog...under any circumstance... :smile:

What is this, the tomato thread all over again?

Any guesses as to how long before this thread gets moved to the PL?

Paulwny
08-06-2003, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum


Growing up in Kankakee there was an A&W stand where they put a meat sauce (not chili) on their dogs. Not as good as a Chicago dog, but better than a chili dog if that's possible.

Hamburger is the meat with the sauce, that's what's called Texas hot sauce here.

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 09:47 AM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
The thought of corned beef with anything, for any reason, is a distressing proposition.

Corned beef with mustard...yum!

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 09:49 AM
Originally posted by Paulwny
Hamburger is the meat with the sauce, that's what's called Texas hot sauce here.

Correct, but hot as in spicy or heated. This wasn't spicy, just heated up.

34 Inch Stick
08-06-2003, 09:49 AM
Amen.

Back to the subject I don't really consider the chili dog a hot dog. The chili dog is has a completely different set of rules.

As for a dog, dijon mustard (to me yellow mustard is like eating vanilla when you could have french vanilla), onions (preferably grilled but raw have their own charm as well), relish (light on the relish because it tends to dominate rather than enhance. The more nucleur green the relish is the better), and celery salt.

I first heard no ketchup during a rerun of that Dirty Harry movie as well. I haven't used it on a dog since. However I do love it on fries.

adsit
08-06-2003, 09:53 AM
Originally posted by Iwritecode
What is this, the tomato thread all over again?

Any guesses as to how long before this thread gets moved to the PL?

Hey, I mentioned the "Fenway Frank" just to keep it baseball-related. But I think I see the security guys making their way over to our section...

Paulwny
08-06-2003, 09:54 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Correct, but hot as in spicy or heated. This wasn't spicy, just heated up.

Yea, I have no idea how the word hot got into the name, it's not spicy just heated. We are talking about the same thing.

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 10:13 AM
Originally posted by Paulwny
Yea, I have no idea how the word hot got into the name, it's not spicy just heated. We are talking about the same thing.

Yes, we definitely are.

Paulwny
08-06-2003, 10:17 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Yes, we definitely are.


Yes, the sauce is the same, it just dawned on me the prep may be different. Here its prepared this way, mustard, onion and then the sauce is poured over.

guillen4life13
08-06-2003, 10:26 AM
Can anyone say "Parking Lot"?

Screw ketchup! Ketchup is reserved for eggs(for me) and potatoes!

1951Campbell
08-06-2003, 10:36 AM
Originally posted by adsit
A side note to travelers: "Chicago-style" hot dogs, like "Chicago-style" pizza, are to be avoided at all costs outside of Chicagoland. Meanwhile, at home, I make 'em the way Mama Portillo taught me :D: .

Actually, there is a gentleman in Albuquerque from Chicago who opened a diner that serves real Chicago-type dogs. My grandpa (who used to live at 1951 Campbell, by the way) used to take me there when I lived in Santa Fe.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-06-2003, 11:02 AM
The WSI green shirts are enjoying this thread too much to move it to the Parking Lot. :smile:

I won't even put ketchup on my fries. I prefer salsa over ketchup on my hamburgers, too.

Unrelated... is it "right" to put mustard over sauerkraut on a bratwurst sandwich? I do this all the time at the Cell but I'm too embarrassed to ask anyone the proper ettiquette. It's the Y chromesome in me. I never ask directions while driving either.

And don't get me started about the TV remote!

:)

voodoochile
08-06-2003, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
The WSI green shirts are enjoying this thread too much to move it to the Parking Lot. :smile:

I won't even put ketchup on my fries. I prefer salsa over ketchup on my hamburgers, too.

Unrelated... is it "right" to put mustard over sauerkraut on a bratwurst sandwich? I do this all the time at the Cell but I'm too embarrassed to ask anyone the proper ettiquette. It's the Y chromesome in me. I never ask directions while driving either.

And don't get me started about the TV remote!

:)

Well, I'm glad I read to the end before moving the thread. I guess I'll leave it right here... :)

Ketchup on a hotdog isn't the worst thing that ever happened, but it has to be a "hotdog" not a brat, Polish or Italian sausage. Ketchup on them is just weird.

A true American Hotdog on a Wonderbread bun isn't bad with ketchup. Personally, I never did care for a true "Chicago style hotdog". If I wanted a salad, I would have ordered a salad...

I like the brats with the grilled onions. I never did get the whole saurkraut thing. I put mustard on top of the onions if that helps at all... :) Of course one thing that always goes good with any cell dog is :gulp:

TornLabrum
08-06-2003, 12:27 PM
Brats must have ketchup and sauerkraut.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-06-2003, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Brats must have ketchup and sauerkraut.

See, I wouldn't put ketchup on my brat for any amount of money. Putting ketchup on a brat with sauerkraut, too, is absolutely repulsive.

All this time I've been thinking I was repulsing somebody for putting mustard on my brat with kraut, and now I find out it's true for all the wrong reasons? I'm stumped. :smile:

maurice
08-06-2003, 01:05 PM
No ketchup on hot dogs or brats, unless you have no other toppings available. There's no need for ketchup on a 'dog if you have tomatoes. That's like putting ketchup on marinara sauce. Horseradish, spicy mustard, or 'kraut on a brat.

Re. hot dog stands which allegedly do not contain ketchup . . . what do you put on their fries? Or is this a "no fries . . . chips" situation?

adsit
08-06-2003, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by 1951Campbell
Actually, there is a gentleman in Albuquerque from Chicago who opened a diner that serves real Chicago-type dogs. My grandpa (who used to live at 1951 Campbell, by the way) used to take me there when I lived in Santa Fe.

All right, I'll amend that... avoid "Chicago-style" eateries outside of Chicago not started by Chicagoans. I'd forgotten the place in Vegas that does dogs right and goes the extra mile, "importing" Vienna beef and Gonnella bread... a bit of Kedzie Ave in the desert.

Nothing like that around here. Ricobene's still in Bridgeport? I've been missing them for years.

maurice
08-06-2003, 02:05 PM
Originally posted by adsit
Ricobene's still in Bridgeport? I've been missing them for years.

Yes, though you'd hardly recognize it for the steak/beef stand of years past. It's now a large, tidy place with the same great food and several additional locations in various parts of the city.

inta
08-06-2003, 03:42 PM
Originally posted by maurice
Yes, though you'd hardly recognize it for the steak/beef stand of years past. It's now a large, tidy place with the same great food and several additional locations in various parts of the city.

oh man, ricobenes...
best saunce in town.

on a similiar note, ricobenes now delivers to the northside, i went to some office party with my girlfriend around the gold coast and her boss had ordered ricobenes and was bragging about how they deliver "all the way up to my condo on chicago avenue now"

not sure what to think of that....

34 Inch Stick
08-06-2003, 04:26 PM
Where is the original location. I am stuck with the one at Wabash and Randolph. I usually find that franchises rarely match the greatness of the original (Al's).

inta
08-06-2003, 05:03 PM
26th st in lovely bridgeport.

34 Inch Stick
08-06-2003, 05:11 PM
What is the cross street on 26th or nearest major intersection?

inta
08-06-2003, 05:13 PM
hrmmm, it's like 2 blocks east of shields.... i think wells?

PaleHoseGeorge
08-06-2003, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
What is the cross street on 26th or nearest major intersection?

26th just east of Princeton.

doublem23
08-06-2003, 07:03 PM
Originally posted by gosox41
I think it was in the movie "Sudden Impact" where Clint Eastwood said something (and I'm paraphrasing) like:

"You know what really bothers me? It's not the murders, rapes, and attacks. It's not seeing all the dead bodies. It's putting ketchup on hot dogs. Nobody....and I mean nobody should be doing that"

My favorite food related quote is Bruce Willis' from the Whole Nine Yards when he goes nuts over them putting mayonnaise on his burger in Montreal. Frickin' hilarious.

Though, I must admit, when I get everything on a burger (mustard, ketchup, lettuce, tomato, and pickles), I like a little mayo.

whitesoxwilkes
08-06-2003, 07:52 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Brats must have ketchup and sauerkraut.

Only if you're from Minnesota. My girlfriend loves ketchup with her kraut. I on the other hand go for strictly mustard (preferably brown and spicy) with my kraut.

Nellie_Fox
08-07-2003, 12:31 AM
Yeah, now that I think about it, I mostly use both ketchup and mustard when I'm having an Oscar Mayer. If I'm having a Vienna or a kosher dog, just mustard.

I'd never put ketchup on a bratwurst. Mustard and sauerkraut, or if there is no kraut I do like honey mustard on a brat.

The "slaw dog" is big all over the south. I've never had one, but my brother who lives in West Virginia tells me they're good.

A "Chicago-style" hot dog stand has opened up in the mall here in town. I have been afraid to try it, but my barber is also originally from Chicago and tells me that they have Vienna dogs. They are also selling Italian beef sandwiches, which are absolutely unheard of here (I saw an "Italian roast beef sandwich" on a menu up in the Twin Cities once. I ordered it, thinking I'd get an Italian beef. Big mistake. I got sliced roast beef with Marinara sauce on it.) I don't yet know if the stand here is using Scala Italian beef. If so, I've got to get me one.

inta
08-07-2003, 02:22 AM
try getting a beef sandwich wet somewhere besides chicago.

i went to toronto once a few years back with some friends and went to a grease pit after some bars.
ask for the sandwich "wet" and they look at me like i'm nuts, then ask if that means if i want american cheese on it.
gardeniera no where to be found...

ah man, i love how chicagoans are so jingoistic about their local cuisine.

hsnterprize
08-07-2003, 04:18 AM
Okay...here's my take on this whole "ketchup and mustard" thing...

First, on my hot dogs, I like ketchup and onions. Sorry...I'll brag about a Chicago-style hot dog to anyone who is from out of town, but I won't eat one. Why...I don't like pickles, mustard, relish, or cold tomato slices. I do like celery salt, though. However, whenever I order a hot dog, I confess I don't ask for it a lot...it often slips my mind. Most of the time, I order a chili dog. Those are my favorites.

As far a Italian beef sandwiches are concerned...to me, those are more of a Chicago treat than the hot dog. Personally, I'll take the beef sandwiches from Parky's in Forest Park...they're the best. However, I'll take a beef sandwich from anyplace that makes than half-decently. There was some place out in Plainfield near the Grundy County border on Caton Farm Road (some restaurant that is half carry out/half dine in) that literally destroyed the sandwich. The meat was too thick and the sandwich itself was WAY too salty. It literally SUCKED!!!!! Oh yeah...if you're in or near the Brookfield area, check out Bambino's on Ogden Avenue. Those sandwiches are great!!! And Parky's...it's on Harlem Avenue near Madison Street...you gotta get one of those if you can.

Anyway, I have another confession to make. When I get a beef sandwich, I like some barbecue sauce drizzled on it. If I can't get a side cup of BBQ sauce at the place, I'll take the food home and put some on there. I don't know exactly what the "Chicago traditional" toppings are on such a delicasy (sp?), but I like then either wet or dipped with sweet peppers.

That's my take on some Chicago cuisines. Gimme red sauce on my Italian sausage with green/red peppers, and you can keep the Chicago hot dog. I love Chicago, but the Chi-style hot dog isn't a winner with me personally. No offense, but gimme either a beef or an Italian sausage any day of the week. That'll make up for the hot dog being scrapped.

34 Inch Stick
08-07-2003, 10:16 AM
Trying to take the post in another direction, eh?

Beef is a much easier topic. The only condiments are hot and sweet peppers. Some places offer the addition of cheese, usually american or mozzarella. Finally there is the decision about dipped (wet) or dry. There is no taboo on beef's (I would say the BBQ sauce is taboo, but you are really just changing it from an Italian to BBQ beef sandwich). Any way you order is simply preference and not lack of sophistication.

I eat it with the full house: hot, sweet, american and wet.

hsn, the BBQ and choice of stands is revealing some bad things about you. There are many good places in the OPRF area and Parky's is not one of them. There is a reason Johnny's has a line out the door all year from opening until closing. Buona's is also very good.

I would like a moment of silence for the closing of the best beef in the entire city closing down due to mismanagement, Vittori's on Taylor. Al's on Taylor used to rule before it franchised. Now it is just another above average beef stand.

Procol Harum
08-07-2003, 11:02 AM
Italian Beef...(Insert Homer Simpson's drooling/salivating noise here). Wet w/ sweet green peppers, occassionally a little melted mozzarella. Portillo's has a nice variant on the trad'l beef sammich w/ its "beef-n-cheddar croissant." Favorites out here in DuPage--Flip's on Roosevelt in Glen Ellyn (fantastic!), Augustino's Deli in Carol Stream, Portillo's, Buona. Up in Lake County--Sammy's in Grayslake and RL Beach is tres delicioso.

BBQ sauce on Italian Beef?? Why would you do that?

Ketchup on brats--tsk-tsk.

Sauerkraut on anything? Of the Devil.

maurice
08-07-2003, 12:49 PM
BBQ beef is a Chicago classic, but it's not nearly on par with a wet Italian beef with peppers. Some also put marinara sauce on their beef. You can get it this way at Ricobene's.

The beef at Buona also is good, but the best is Mr. Beef on Orleans. I could eat 3 or 4 of those things easy, and I'm not a big eater.

hold2dibber
08-07-2003, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
I would like a moment of silence for the closing of the best beef in the entire city closing down due to mismanagement, Vittori's on Taylor.


Ahhh! Are you serious? I haven't been to Vitts for ages, but I LOVE that place (I guess "loved" that place is correct now). No fries, just chips. You want a soft drink? Go across the street to the little grocery store. And the beef - omigod! The best. There was a Vitts on Ogden in Downers Grove, too, and that was great. It closed about a year ago - is that when Vitts on Taylor closed?

Finally, for those who are in the know on those slaw dogs from down South - what kind of slaw? Vinegar based or mayo based?

Procol Harum
08-07-2003, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by hold2dibber
Finally, for those who are in the know on those slaw dogs from down South - what kind of slaw? Vinegar based or mayo based?

For hot dogs it's a mayo-based slaw but never by itself--always seen it with chili or some sort of meat sauce akin to Coney Island sauce. I know that in western NC a finely-chopped, vinegar-based tomato sauce slaw is used for that most glorious of all foods, shredded pork bbq; people in the eastern part of the state use mayo-based slaw with their bbq.

maff
08-07-2003, 02:11 PM
The ONLY kind of hot dog that I eat are Kosher Hot Dogs, not for religous reasons, just because they have that taste to them and their bigger and better than those nasty Oscar Meyers.

BTW-- Ranch Dressing is way better with fries, it should become the new ketchup.

hempsox
08-07-2003, 02:11 PM
OK
Hot Dogs of the Oscar Meyer variety need ketchup/mustard to cut out the thought of what actually went into them. Relish if available.

Brats DESERVE the repect of mustard and kraut...my wife brought me a brat w/ mustard the other day...I took it back to the kitchen and washed it off and had to get the grill hot again.

My question to you is this...sweet or dill relish on your dog. My preference is and always will be DILL

34 Inch Stick
08-07-2003, 02:47 PM
I can go with either.

The dog question that has not been brought up here, and which I believe is critical to the taste, is grilled, steamed or boiled?

Grilled anything is always great for me. However I have eaten many a fine steamed dog. Boiled is the worst of the three but the worst hot dog is better than a lot of other meals.

Procol Harum
08-07-2003, 02:55 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
The dog question that has not been brought up here, and which I believe is critical to the taste, is grilled, steamed or boiled?


Steamed is best for achieving the "purest" hot dog experience; but, of course, how can you go wrong with the taste of a freshly-grilled dog? For home convenience, boiled will do--but durned if I'm gonna pay good fast food money for a boiled hot dog.

voodoochile
08-07-2003, 03:05 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
For hot dogs it's a mayo-based slaw but never by itself--always seen it with chili or some sort of meat sauce akin to Coney Island sauce. I know that in western NC a finely-chopped, vinegar-based tomato sauce slaw is used for that most glorious of all foods, shredded pork bbq; people in the eastern part of the state use mayo-based slaw with their bbq.

And it is a decent combination. A pulled BBQ pork or beef sandwich with a poppy seed coleslaw on top of it is excellent...

hold2dibber
08-07-2003, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by maff
BTW-- Ranch Dressing is way better with fries, it should become the new ketchup.

I've taken to dipping my frieds in mayo - way good. Of course, I can actually hear my arteries slamming shut with every bite. But mmm-mmm-mmm, that's good eatin'.

voodoochile
08-07-2003, 03:23 PM
Originally posted by hold2dibber
I've taken to dipping my frieds in mayo - way good. Of course, I can actually hear my arteries slamming shut with every bite. But mmm-mmm-mmm, that's good eatin'.

My mom used to butter her fries, but gave it up when people gave her too much grief.

Ranch dressing is the bomb on any fried food...

Nellie_Fox
08-07-2003, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by hold2dibber
I've taken to dipping my frieds in mayo - way good. Of course, I can actually hear my arteries slamming shut with every bite. But mmm-mmm-mmm, that's good eatin'. Tartar sauce is even better with fries.

cheeses_h_rice
08-07-2003, 04:22 PM
Wow, who'd've thunk that my near-foul-ball experience would morph into a 1000+ view, horrendously off-topic gabfest?

(And no, I'm not complaining. I find it quite humorous, actually.)

:)

PaleHoseGeorge
08-07-2003, 05:26 PM
Is it too late to put in a vote for Savoia's T'GO for the best Italian beef sandwich? I grew up in duh Heights, so I admit to a bias. :smile:

Damn, this thread moves fast!

:bandance:

inta
08-07-2003, 06:10 PM
back on the subject of places for a good beef sammich briefly...

has anyone been to a place called BEEFEE?

i drove down north avenue to to my grandma's in oak park the other day and was kinda shocked to see like 5 diff't BEEFEE joints.
granted these are all in the middle of some pretty nasty neighborhoods... but they must have some what of a following...

harwar
08-07-2003, 06:16 PM
I grew up not far from Comiskey Park and the only person in my old neighborhood to use ketchup on a dog was my sister.We have had many a battle on this subject and it continues to this day.
Also,the best italian beef sandwich that i ever had was from a small place near archer & california,i can't remember the name but it was a shack the size of a small garage.I don't think that i've had a good one in 25 years.

TornLabrum
08-07-2003, 06:34 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Ranch dressing is the bomb on any fried food...

Especially breaded mushrooms. [Another insertion of Homer's drooling sound here.]

TornLabrum
08-07-2003, 06:36 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Is it too late to put in a vote for Savoia's T'GO for the best Italian beef sandwich? I grew up in duh Heights, so I admit to a bias. :smile:

Damn, this thread moves fast!

:bandance:

Their beefs are great. Their calamari is to die for.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-07-2003, 06:48 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Ranch dressing is the bomb on any fried food...

As somebody who cut his teeth in the food business selling salad dressings, I can tell you with great authority that Hidden Valley makes the best ranch. Seven Seas used to make a good one, too, but Kraft screwed it all up. The absolute worst ranch dressings are Henri's and Wishbone. In fact practically everything from Wishbone (actually UniLever) sucks except their Italian which is really good. Of course most every dressing sold in the produce section is good, but you pay through the nose with the margins they get away with over there.

And if you have a true affinity for sweet'n spicy French dressing, try Richelieu. It's the bomb.

Okay, now we're really off-topic. :smile:

sox_fan_forever
08-07-2003, 11:52 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
The dog question that has not been brought up here, and which I believe is critical to the taste, is grilled, steamed or boiled?


Grilled, definitely! If there's one thing I can't stand it's a boiled hot dog....

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 12:42 AM
Originally posted by sox_fan_forever
Grilled, definitely! If there's one thing I can't stand it's a boiled hot dog....

I remember as a kid taking a hot dog, putting it on a meat fork (one of those things with the two tines), and holding it over the gas burner until the entire skin was pretty close to being charcoal. That's good eatin'.

doublem23
08-08-2003, 12:53 AM
Hot dogs can't be grilled, they're too puny and weak. Best served steamed, IMO, but I'm fine with boilin'. Brats and polish sausage, OTOH, must be grilled.

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 12:57 AM
Originally posted by doublem23
Hot dogs can't be grilled, they're too puny and weak. Best served steamed, IMO, but I'm fine with boilin'. Brats and polish sausage, OTOH, must be grilled.

On that hot dog program on PBS that I mentioned earlier in the thread, there was one place (Pittsburgh?) where they deep fry their dogs. They should probably call that place Coronary City.

hsnterprize
08-08-2003, 05:46 AM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
Trying to take the post in another direction, eh?

Beef is a much easier topic. The only condiments are hot and sweet peppers. Some places offer the addition of cheese, usually american or mozzarella. Finally there is the decision about dipped (wet) or dry. There is no taboo on beef's (I would say the BBQ sauce is taboo, but you are really just changing it from an Italian to BBQ beef sandwich). Any way you order is simply preference and not lack of sophistication.

I eat it with the full house: hot, sweet, american and wet.

hsn, the BBQ and choice of stands is revealing some bad things about you. There are many good places in the OPRF area and Parky's is not one of them. There is a reason Johnny's has a line out the door all year from opening until closing. Buona's is also very good.

I would like a moment of silence for the closing of the best beef in the entire city closing down due to mismanagement, Vittori's on Taylor. Al's on Taylor used to rule before it franchised. Now it is just another above average beef stand. Okay...first things first. I don't think I'm turning an Italian beef to a BBQ beef sandwich because I'm only drizzling the sauce on the sandwich. I can eat the thing with sweet peppers only just like anyone else who loves the beef. (Boy...I'm sounding like I'm taking this really seriously, but I know it's only a matter of taste). Not to mention, I think location preferences could end up being fighting words with as much as we're recommending place after place. Since I'm living near Midway Airport now, I'll give an endorsement to Windy City Hot Dogs on 63rd street. Their beefs aren't bad either. I admit I haven't been in the Oak Park/Forest Park area for a while, but I'll still stand by my Parky's endorsement.

hsnterprize
08-08-2003, 05:48 AM
Wow...with all this writing about hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches, I'm tempted to open a thread about how people like their steaks? Me personally...medium well with A-1.

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 06:25 AM
Originally posted by hsnterprize
Wow...with all this writing about hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches, I'm tempted to open a thread about how people like their steaks? Me personally...medium well with A-1.

Medium rare with Cross & Blackwell steak sauce.

The steak sandwiches at The Cell must be eaten with "Secret Sauce" and grilled onions.

inta
08-08-2003, 07:20 AM
hmmm, never had the steak sammich at the cell, what exactly is the secret sauce like?
i'm curious now.

as far as steaks go, i like mine pretty much medium, throw it on grill close to the charcoals so that the outsides/fat get seared and crispy but the inside's still a bit pink

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 07:38 AM
Originally posted by inta
hmmm, never had the steak sammich at the cell, what exactly is the secret sauce like?
i'm curious now.

It's a secret! I'd say the closest thing to it might be Arby's barbeque sauce, but then again, I haven't eaten that in years. I favor horsey sauce.

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 09:17 AM
Let me diverge even farther afield from the original topic(s)--pancakes. I'm for light and thin w/ plenty o' butter and maple syrple. My wife, on the other hand, eschews the maple syrup in favor of powdered sugar and has corrupted two of my three sons--is this powdered sugar on pancakes a widespread practice, or just another of her warped personal foodways?

In terms of who does the flapjackin', generally, I've got to go w/ homemade, although IHOP does make a decent pancake. While the breakfasts are good at all the local Greek-owned spots here in West-Central DuPage, I must say that they generally fall down when it comes to their pancake skills--they all seem to have a very obvious "mixey" taste.

inta
08-08-2003, 09:50 AM
ROFL
"pancakes"

this is getting to be a bit much... hilarious tho.

i like mine drowning in butter and maple.
that maple cream syrup that comes out of LaGrange is pretty good too.

i'm actually quite surprised no one's brought up corned beef....

Dadawg_77
08-08-2003, 10:05 AM
From what I hear, Johnies' Beef took a fall for the worse after the new ownership came in. There Iceies are still good and could be drawing the crowds.

maff
08-08-2003, 10:06 AM
i'm actually quite surprised no one's brought up corned beef....

So am I. I like mine on Rye with a slab of Mustard.

BTW-- I love Comiskeys food, think its the best in baseball, but theirs two things I just can't stand, the shriveled up cheddarwursts or the soggy, stringy italian beef, everything else is superb.

If anyone lives near Libertyville they can help me out on this one, theres a fast-food italian place there that begins with a P, for some reason I can't remember their name, but they have the best Italian beef I've ever tasted. :D:

QueerGirrl
08-08-2003, 10:34 AM
I take my steak medium with Hines 57 sauce.

Brats grilled with brown mustard, grilled onions and kraut.

Beef sandwiches wet with sweet peppers.

Corned beef sandwiches served on rye with brown mustard and occasionally swiss cheese (Manny's is the best).

Pancakes with tons of butter and syrup.

And my dogs grilled and served "Chicago Style".



At this rate I'll be dead before I'm 40!

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 10:37 AM
Originally posted by hsnterprize
Wow...with all this writing about hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches, I'm tempted to open a thread about how people like their steaks? Me personally...medium well with A-1.

That's not a steak. That's a piece of leather with gravy... :D:

medium rare to bloody rare with mushrooms...

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by QueerGirrl
And my dogs grilled and served "Chicago Style".


Technically speaking a Chicago Style Hot Dog calls for a boiled dog. But, I still don't get the hype over them...

inta
08-08-2003, 10:41 AM
anyone ever been to Horan's Snug in Oak Park?

some of the best corned beef sandwiches i've ever had, super thin slices heated up... they seriously put about a pound of meat on the bread.

they're also a sox friendly location, the plan bus trips to some games.

highly recommended if you're around that area.

jabrch
08-08-2003, 11:36 AM
Originally posted by maff
So am I. I like mine on Rye with a slab of Mustard.

BTW-- I love Comiskeys food, think its the best in baseball, but theirs two things I just can't stand, the shriveled up cheddarwursts or the soggy, stringy italian beef, everything else is superb.

If anyone lives near Libertyville they can help me out on this one, theres a fast-food italian place there that begins with a P, for some reason I can't remember their name, but they have the best Italian beef I've ever tasted. :D:


Portillos...and it is awesome. Their beef is good and their Ribs are FANTASTIC!

longshot7
08-08-2003, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by hose
Biggest joke in the hot dog business is in Los Angeles.

Der Wienerscnitchel, which is a chain of hot dog stands that are about as bad as hot dogs get.

Hey, Wienerschnitzel has the closest thing to a Chicago-dog out here - with actual mustard and onions and stuff. For some reason, everyone out here has an obsession with chili - it goes on everything. Sorry, but chili belongs in a bowl, not on other food.

and put putting ketchup on anything-sausage related (hot dog, brat, etc) is pure heresy.

maurice
08-08-2003, 12:09 PM
Miller's Pub has the best ribs in the city, though others like Gale St. and Carsons.

A high-quality, medium-rare steak does not require any sauce.

Manny's or Best's lean corned beef on rye with spicy mustard.

Pancakes with syrup only. If they're cooked right, they should be plenty buttery already (e.g., the "big man" breakfast at the Bridgeport, which includes pancakes, eggs, potatoes, and a meat of your choice for under $5).

It's tough to grill a 'dog without burning the heck out of it. They deep-fry 'dogs at Cozydog in Springfield and at places selling corn dogs.

TIME FOR LUNCH!

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 01:02 PM
Best pancakes I ever ate (other than those made by my sainted mother), are the razor-thin ones served "all you can eat" at the Kirkwood Lodge in the Ozarks, Missouri. Ah... it's been 25 years but I can taste them like it was yesterday... barely one-quarter inch thick, yet not the least bit doughy tasting... lots of butter and animal fat already mixed in... piles and piles to eat with plenty of maple syrup ready at the table... nobody clogs an artery like rural Missouri. :smile:

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 01:08 PM
Siegalman's on Algonquin Road in Rolling Meadows (Arlington Hts.?) makes a corned beef reuben sandwich that is to die for. The matzo ball soup is great, too. And the kosher dills... oy vay!

You can never go wrong inside an authentic Jewish deli.

:)

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 01:55 PM
Another important tangent--a friend and I got into an "argument" about this last night--malts or milkshakes?

I came down firmly on the milkshake side of the ledger while he claimed that no, most people, if given an option, would rather have a malt. I opined that he was obviously ensnared by the wiles of Satan in this matter.

I've surfed the web in vain for any stats on this earthshaking question of the age, but I do have an inquiry into the marketing guy at Oberweis.

At any rate, what say ye, WSI--what's your druthers?

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 01:58 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Best pancakes I ever ate (other than those made by my sainted mother), are the razor-thin ones served "all you can eat" at the Kirkwood Lodge in the Ozarks, Missouri. Ah... it's been 25 years but I can taste them like it was yesterday... barely one-quarter inch thick, yet not the least bit doughy tasting... lots of butter and animal fat already mixed in... piles and piles to eat with plenty of maple syrup ready at the table... nobody clogs an artery like rural Missouri. :smile:

In the city, for great pancakes on the weekend go to Frances deli at about 2540 N Clark St. Home made batter and perfectly cooked, everytime. Bananas and syrup ON a pancake are great. I never cared for fruit IN my pankakes though.

Frances also has great deli sandwiches. Lots of triple deckers made on real kosher rye. Home cooked meats. Yum...

Good menu all around...

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 01:58 PM
Originally posted by maurice
Miller's Pub has the best ribs in the city, though others like Gale St. and Carsons.


Carson's--overpriced and overrated--Barnelli's/Barney's/Portillo's much better for my moolah.

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 01:59 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Another important tangent--a friend and I got into an "argument" about this last night--malts or milkshakes?

I came down firmly on the milkshake side of the ledger while he claimed that no, most people, if given an option, would rather have a malt. I opined that he was obviously ensnared by the wiles of Satan in this matter.

I've surfed the web in vain for any stats on this earthshaking question of the age, but I do have an inquiry into the marketing guy at Oberweis.

At any rate, what say ye, WSI--what's your druthers?

Isn't a malt just a milkshake with malt flavoring in it? I prefer a malt when givent the option, but no one sells them anymore.

Going to Champaign for the Bears game tomorrow and wll definitely go to "The Custard Cup" which makes swirled ice cream concoctions form home made soft serve custard. They offer malt as an option and I always get it...

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 02:06 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Isn't a malt just a milkshake with malt flavoring in it? I prefer a malt when givent the option, but no one sells them anymore.

Going to Champaign for the Bears game tomorrow and wll definitely go to "The Custard Cup" which makes swirled ice cream concoctions form home made soft serve custard. They offer malt as an option and I always get it...

Generally true, me thinks, but the flavor-range is a lot more limited dontcha think? Like, I never heard of a "cherry malt" or a "banana malt" or a "Chocolate chip mint malt" (that really sounds disgusting...). Are malts just served as chocolate and vanilla--are there even strawberry malts? yeah, come to think of it, I think there are.

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 02:10 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Generally true, me thinks, but the flavor-range is a lot more limited dontcha think? Like, I never heard of a "cherry malt" or a "banana malt" or a "Chocolate chip mint malt" (that really sounds disgusting, come to think of it...). Are malts just served as chocolate and vanilla--are there even strawberry malts? yeah, come to think of it, I think there are.

When I go to the Custard Cup, I always get the turtle (carmel, fudge and peanut) custard cup conconction. I always have them add malt and it is delicious. I never order shakes much anymore. If I'm going to drink that many calories, it might as well be beer...

maurice
08-08-2003, 02:10 PM
:tomatoaward

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by maurice
:tomatoaward

Food and beer threads. Count on it almost everytime...

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 02:15 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I never order shakes much anymore. If I'm going to drink that many calories, it might as well be beer...

Yeah, or get a Diet Coke and save the calories for the cheeseburgers, brats, Italian beef, etc., etc....

MisterB
08-08-2003, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by maurice
:tomatoaward

The amazing thing is that this thread wasn't moved to the Parking Lot days ago...the mods are obviously in a food-induced coma. :D:

34 Inch Stick
08-08-2003, 02:30 PM
Procol, we tend to agree on a lot things so I am suprised to hear your negative thoughts on Carsons. Ribs are all about the sauce and you don't find a much better sauce than Carsons. Like Homer, I prefer pork chops anyway. It is expensive.

I have a tough time ordering ribs from a fast food place so I am reluctant to attempt it at Barnellis.

There are so many different types of pancakes, I couldn't do the topic justice in one post. If you want thin pancakes you should be looking for Swedish. If you want Swedish you should be looking in Andersonville. Since I moved to Ravenswood I have found many good Swedish pancake places.

If you are looking for regular pancakes you have got to go to a pancake house. The best I have found is Walker Brothers Pancake House on Green Bay in Evanston (many other locations as well). Original Pancake House is a reasonable reproduction of Walker Brothers.

I used to eat my pancakes dry in some stupid attempt to cut calories. Since I have embraced my obesity I go with butter and syrup and then go home for a nap.

maurice
08-08-2003, 03:37 PM
Lithiuanian pancakes also are very thin. Get them with a variety of toppings at Healthy Foods on Halsted.

For potato pancakes, try Resi's on Irving Park. Ummm . . . fried carbs with apple sauce or sour cream and a Weis beer.

:gulp:

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 03:38 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
Procol, we tend to agree on a lot things so I am suprised to hear your negative thoughts on Carsons. Ribs are all about the sauce and you don't find a much better sauce than Carsons. Like Homer, I prefer pork chops anyway. It is expensive.

I have a tough time ordering ribs from a fast food place so I am reluctant to attempt it at Barnellis.

There are so many different types of pancakes, I couldn't do the topic justice in one post. If you want thin pancakes you should be looking for Swedish. If you want Swedish you should be looking in Andersonville. Since I moved to Ravenswood I have found many good Swedish pancake places.

If you are looking for regular pancakes you have got to go to a pancake house. The best I have found is Walker Brothers Pancake House on Green Bay in Evanston (many other locations as well). Original Pancake House is a reasonable reproduction of Walker Brothers.

I used to eat my pancakes dry in some stupid attempt to cut calories. Since I have embraced my obesity I go with butter and syrup and then go home for a nap.



34--what can I say? The ribs are really good at Barney's/Barnelli's--the sauce is good and the meat is almost always great. Despite the fact that they have 15-20 locations, I can't come to think of Portillo's as a "chain" restaurant--this is good ol' Chicago-style chow with a pretty good eye for consistency and quality across their outlets.

My experience with Carson's comes from their old restaurant in Lombard which closed several years back. Perhaps their ribs were not up to snuff with their other outlets, but I found them very pricey and inconsistent--particularly when it came to the quality of their meat.

Walker Bros.' apple pancakes are truly tasty--and their omelettes ain't bad, neither.

And yes, I too embraced my "inner fat man" several years ago--and now he's my outer fat man, too!! :D:

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 05:44 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
medium rare to bloody rare with mushrooms...

Now you're talkin'! Mushrooms are even better than Cross & Blackwell Steak Sauce...although I've even done both on occasion.

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 05:47 PM
Originally posted by longshot7
Hey, Wienerschnitzel has the closest thing to a Chicago-dog out here - with actual mustard and onions and stuff. For some reason, everyone out here has an obsession with chili - it goes on everything. Sorry, but chili belongs in a bowl, not on other food.

and put putting ketchup on anything-sausage related (hot dog, brat, etc) is pure heresy.

Agree on the second point, not on the first. Chilidogs are one of those things that make life worth living...and a whole lot shorter. The only things that belong on chilidogs are raw onion and maybe cheese (but, of course that makes it a chilicheesedog).

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 05:49 PM
TRIVIA TIME!

Name the movie...

"I'll have the Durwood Kirby burger.... bloody... and a $5 shake."

"'scuse me, did you just order a $5 shake? That's milk and ice cream... You don't put bourbon in it or nuthin?"

"No."

"Just checkin'."

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 05:49 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Another important tangent--a friend and I got into an "argument" about this last night--malts or milkshakes?

I came down firmly on the milkshake side of the ledger while he claimed that no, most people, if given an option, would rather have a malt. I opined that he was obviously ensnared by the wiles of Satan in this matter.

I've surfed the web in vain for any stats on this earthshaking question of the age, but I do have an inquiry into the marketing guy at Oberweis.

At any rate, what say ye, WSI--what's your druthers?

Malts for chocolate only. Milkshakes for everything else...mmm...strawberry milkshake...mmm....

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 05:50 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Isn't a malt just a milkshake with malt flavoring in it? I prefer a malt when givent the option, but no one sells them anymore.

Go immediately to the nearest Oberweis Dairy!

TornLabrum
08-08-2003, 05:54 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
My experience with Carson's comes from their old restaurant in Lombard which closed several years back. Perhaps their ribs were not up to snuff with their other outlets, but I found them very pricey and inconsistent--particularly when it came to the quality of their meat.

Could be. I mean, look at the difference between the pizza at the franchised Pizzeria Uno vs. the original Uno and Due. There is no comparison, and they're all run by the same outfit.

Procol Harum
08-08-2003, 06:10 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Could be. I mean, look at the difference between the pizza at the franchised Pizzeria Uno vs. the original Uno and Due. There is no comparison, and they're all run by the same outfit.

Ain't that the truth? I'd as soon flip a frozen Tombstone into the oven at home than go to the suburban Unos...

whitesoxwilkes
08-08-2003, 06:10 PM
Gotta get my 2 pennies in:

Italian Beef: hot, sweet and dipped. The Patio on Taylor, not far from my, Voodoo's and SoCalUIC's alma mater is easily the best in the city. You can actually see the seasoning on the beef...mmm. Made the mistake of ordering a beef at Giordano's on Jackson once. Worst. Beef. Ever. Limp bread. Dry beef.

Hot dogs: Grilled, served with onions and yellow mustard. Different from bratwurst, which gets kraut and spicy brown mustard. Anyone else here ever try a white hot dog? They're all pork, and are a delicacy in upstate NY.

Steak: Medium rare, lots of mushrooms. One of my big beefs when I order in a restaraunt is they never give you enough mushrooms. I prefer a good NY strip to a filet. No sauce unless it's a $3.99 chop steak from Ronnie's on Wabash, where I often go after one of my benders.

Chicken wings: They haven't been discussed yet. TRUE Buffalo wings are not breaded and have a hot orangish sauce just like at the Anchor Bar in the Nickel City, where they were invented. Wings are consumed with Bleu Cheese, celery and carrots. NO RANCH DRESSING!

Pancakes: Butter and syrup galore.

voodoochile
08-08-2003, 06:14 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
Chicken wings: They haven't been discussed yet. TRUE Buffalo wings are not breaded and have a hot orangish sauce just like at the Anchor Bar in the Nickel City, where they were invented. Wings are consumed with Bleu Cheese, celery and carrots. NO RANCH DRESSING!

That hot orange sauce is:

1/2 louisiana style hotsauce - not tabasco, louisiana stle like "Red Hot".

1/2 BBQ sauce - pick one you like, not chunky.

Some people take out half of the hotsauce and substitute with liquid margerine.

Just thought you would like to know in case you ever get adventurous and want to make your own...

You are correct about the wings. They should be baked or fried, but never breaded.

adsit
08-08-2003, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
Anyone else here ever try a white hot dog? They're all pork, and are a delicacy in upstate NY.

The "Rochester White Hot!" My second-favorite hot dog. With onions, peppers, and mustard.

To chime in on a few other things:

Uno's in Mass. are everywhere and they are always jammed... they even have one in the Basketball HOF complex. I don't understand the attraction... not even close to the original.

I'm old enough to remember when Portillo's was just a hot dog trailer in Villa Park, and have been happy to note that their quality has not suffered through franchising. Looking fwd to my next visit there to see if Ricobene's and Oberweis have "diluted" well.

I always gain at least five pounds every time I come home for a visit...

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 06:39 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
Gotta get my 2 pennies in:

.....Italian Beef: hot, sweet and dipped. The Patio on Taylor, not far from my, Voodoo's and SoCalUIC's alma mater is easily the best in the city. You can actually see the seasoning on the beef...mmm. Made the mistake of ordering a beef at Giordano's on Jackson once. Worst. Beef. Ever. Limp bread. Dry beef.

True story. Mrs. PHG was asked to become Mrs. PHG after passing the ultimate PHG matrimonial test: will she enjoy a Patio hot dog sitting on a concrete stoop along the sidewalk at Taylor & Laflin?

Mind you, this is directly across the street from the original Rosebud Cafe, one of the nicest Italian restaurants in Little Italy. The stoop belonged to a dry cleaner, but I don't recall what business is there today. However I do know that for at least 20 years that same building has a foundation collapsing on itself and the whole structure could fall onto Laflin at any moment. Anywho, willingly sitting there eating a $2 hot dog while well-dressed Rosebud patrons pull up in $80,000 luxury sedans was the ultimate test for living life with PHG. She of course passed with flying colors. :smile:

I became attached to the Patio's Chicago-style double-dogs (garnished with everything, including the sport peppers on top) as a poor student at UIC (CBA, '84). I lived in SRH for two years, then had apartments in Circle Park and at Laflin & Fillmore, and $2 for a sandwich, fries, and small drink fit my budget neatly. The neighborhood was a lot rougher back in the early-80's, and the women who still work behind the counter are about as hard-boiled as I've ever encountered. I still go there whenever I'm visiting the 'hood. They aren't break dancing on the sidewalks anymore and the price of housing has increased at least five-fold, too.

Now the million dollar question only Mrs. PHG can answer: what test did I pass? :D:

whitesoxwilkes
08-08-2003, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
True story. Mrs. PHG was asked to become Mrs. PHG after passing the ultimate PHG matrimonial test: will she enjoy a Patio hot dog sitting on a concrete stoop along the sidewalk at Taylor & Laflin?

Mind you, this is directly across the street from the original Rosebud Cafe, one of the nicest Italian restaurants in Little Italy. The stoop belonged to a dry cleaner, but I don't recall what business is there today. However I do know that for at least 20 years that same building has a foundation collapsing on itself and the whole structure could fall onto Laflin at any moment. Anywho, willingly sitting there eating a $2 hot dog while well-dressed Rosebud patrons pull up in $80,000 luxury sedans was the ultimate test for living life with PHG. She of course passed with flying colors. :smile:

I became attached to the Patio's Chicago-style double-dogs (garnished with everything, including the sport peppers on top) as a poor student at UIC (CBA, '84). I lived in SRH for two years, then had apartments in Circle Park and at Laflin & Flournoy, and $2 for a sandwich, fries, and small drink fit my budget neatly. The neighborhood was a lot rougher back in the early-80's, and the women who still work behind the counter are about as hard-boiled as I've ever encountered. I still go there whenever I'm visiting the 'hood. They aren't break dancing on the sidewalks anymore and the price of housing has increased at least five-fold, too.

Now the million dollar question only Mrs. PHG can answer: what test did I pass? :D:

A great recent addition to Little Italy is the Illinois Bar and Grill, located diagonally from the Piazza DiMaggio. They serve up a burger the size of a small child with the works for $4.99, and pints of High Life for $2. One of my favorite places to slum.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 07:00 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
A great recent addition to Little Italy is the Illinois Bar and Grill, located diagonally from the Piazza DiMaggio. They serve up a burger the size of a small child with the works for $4.99, and pints of High Life for $2. One of my favorite places to slum.

That used to be Dilligaf's. That was my favorite watering hole... emphasis on hole. It was the first (and for quite a while only) dive on the entire street where college students and the locals could co-exist drunk peacefully. :smile:

They used to have impromptu tournaments of Morta, an Italian hand-guessing game only a bit more complicated than rock-paper-scissors.

"Hey Joe, you bring your Morta board with you?"
"Yeah, I've got it right here!"

:)

Fridaythe13thJason
08-08-2003, 07:09 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
True story. Mrs. PHG was asked to become Mrs. PHG after passing the ultimate PHG matrimonial test: will she enjoy a Patio hot dog sitting on a concrete stoop along the sidewalk at Taylor & Laflin?

Mind you, this is directly across the street from the original Rosebud Cafe, one of the nicest Italian restaurants in Little Italy. The stoop belonged to a dry cleaner, but I don't recall what business is there today. However I do know that for at least 20 years that same building has a foundation collapsing on itself and the whole structure could fall onto Laflin at any moment. Anywho, willingly sitting there eating a $2 hot dog while well-dressed Rosebud patrons pull up in $80,000 luxury sedans was the ultimate test for living life with PHG. She of course passed with flying colors. :smile:

I became attached to the Patio's Chicago-style double-dogs (garnished with everything, including the sport peppers on top) as a poor student at UIC (CBA, '84). I lived in SRH for two years, then had apartments in Circle Park and at Laflin & Flournoy, and $2 for a sandwich, fries, and small drink fit my budget neatly. The neighborhood was a lot rougher back in the early-80's, and the women who still work behind the counter are about as hard-boiled as I've ever encountered. I still go there whenever I'm visiting the 'hood. They aren't break dancing on the sidewalks anymore and the price of housing has increased at least five-fold, too.

Now the million dollar question only Mrs. PHG can answer: what test did I pass? :D:

Man, I wish I wasn't missing in action for most of this conversation. I have very intense views on hot dogs, and living out here people don't understand me.

It's interesting that I found a small hot dog stand out here that serves "Chicago Style Hot Dogs." I was skeptical, but they do a good job. They get everything from Vienna and serve it with everything clear to the sport peppers and celery salt. They had what they called a "Comisky [sic] Dog," but I didn't quite get it. It had Kraut on it or something. I didn't ask...just enjoyed the pretty decent hot dog.

Gosh, this thread has so many memories, I, too, lived in SRH for two years. Best name for a res hall ever....Student Residence Hall.

I spent drunken nights at I-Bar and at the greese that is the Patio. The other day I craved a Mario's Lemonade. Next summer, though...ahhh.

whitesoxwilkes
08-08-2003, 07:11 PM
Originally posted by SoCalUIC


I spent drunken nights at I-Bar and at the greese that is the Patio. The other day I craved a Mario's Lemonade. Next summer, though...ahhh.

SoCal, when you get back here, I think we'll have to organize a WSI outing to Little Italy.

Fridaythe13thJason
08-08-2003, 07:15 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
SoCal, when you get back here, I think we'll have to organize a WSI outing to Little Italy.

When I get back, I will be excited to catch a game or beer with any of you and meet up in person. I'm actually doing some job searching right now just in the case that anything opens up, and I would then move right away.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-08-2003, 07:20 PM
Originally posted by SoCalUIC
....Gosh, this thread has so many memories, I, too, lived in SRH for two years. Best name for a res hall ever....Student Residence Hall.

LOL! SRH, room #714. I remember it because I had the same room for two years, the second year sharing the entire floor with first-year med students in the College of Medicine. Oh, brother... that's not an experience I will ever forget...

Man, what a dump. We used to study in the cafeteria late at night on the main floor. The mice would come out around 12 am, the silverfish a bit earlier. Ah, memories...

:smile:

Nellie_Fox
08-09-2003, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
If you are looking for regular pancakes you have got to go to a pancake house. The best I have found is Walker Brothers Pancake House on Green Bay in Evanston (many other locations as well). Original Pancake House is a reasonable reproduction of Walker Brothers. When I worked at one in my pimply-faced teenage years (bussing tables) it was Walker Brothers' Original Pancake House (in LaGrange, on LaGrange Road just north of Ogden.) Forty-niner flapjacks, chewy and gooey, were my favorite.

Nellie_Fox
08-09-2003, 12:52 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Go immediately to the nearest Oberweis Dairy! I could be wrong, but I think even Dairy Queen still sells malteds.

Nellie_Fox
08-09-2003, 12:55 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
That hot orange sauce is:

1/2 louisiana style hotsauce - not tabasco, louisiana stle like "Red Hot". I've brought home sauce from New Orleans that you couldn't use as half of anything. More than one drop will bring you to your knees. The bottles have warnings about people with heart conditions using it at all.

voodoochile
08-09-2003, 12:59 AM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
I've brought home sauce from New Orleans that you couldn't use as half of anything. More than one drop will bring you to your knees. The bottles have warnings about people with heart conditions using it at all.

Yeah, I know. My friend has one whose slogan is "pain is good". No lie...

There is a specific style of hotsauce called "Louisiana style" Durkee RedHot is one such brand. There are others. It tends to be less spicy than tabasco and with more vinigar and salt.

There is a South Side fried chicken tradition called Harold's. There are about 50 of them or something scattered all over the south side. They deep fry their chicken and then cover it in Louisiana style hotsauce. It is unbelievably good and unbelievably bad for you. I may have to go get some from just thinking about it... drools...

Nellie_Fox
08-09-2003, 01:00 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
However I do know that for at least 20 years that same building has a foundation collapsing on itself and the whole structure could fall onto Laflin at any moment. That's the place where the concrete steps leading in were crumbling, with one side of them roped off so you wouldn't even try to use them? Oh, yeah. I've been there. It's a while ago, and I'd forgotten the name and where it was. But that was the best Italian beef I've ever had. Flypaper strips hanging down, the walls filthy with decades of grease, and extremely grouchy (not putting on a show like the Wiener Circle, but just genuinely crabby) old ladies behind the counter.

doublem23
08-09-2003, 01:50 AM
Gonna thrown some more cents in the fountain...

First off, the Gale St. Inn (which was mentioned about 40 posts ago), near the corner of Lawrence and Milwaukee (near the Jefferson Park stop on the Blue Line), is simply the best ribs in the city. No comparison, IMO.

Second, although I think it's technically in Harwood Heights, Jay's Beef, just north of Montrose on Narragansett has killer beef.

Third, the best "mom and pop" places for hot dogs I have been to are either Toot's at the corner of Montros and Central or Superdawg, at the intersection of Milwaukee, Nagle, and Devon. Best about Superdawg's is that its one of those places where you just sit in your car, order through the box, and they bring the food to you. There's another Toot's at the strip mall at Foster and Harlem. Also, Pierisi (sp?) on 63rd St. between Narragansett and Austin serves up a solid dog and they'll give you a nice pound of fries. Snowflake, on Ogden Ave, just outside the city past the Des Plaines River (I want to say in Lyons :?: ) has good food, too, and has really, really good shakes. Lastly, Fluky's used to have really, really good hot dogs, too. Can't remember where they used to be, but I think it was up by Evanston because we would always go there after a doctor's appointment and my pediatrician was up on Howard St. by California. I think there's still one in the Lincoln Town Center Food Court, if I'm not mistaken.

Foruth, if you want good Italian food, I'd recommend the Como on Milwaukee Ave over by Ogden and Grand. It's kind of expensive, though, and if you don't feel like forking over some dough, Pete's Pizza over by Belmont and Western (IIRC) is also very good for a fraction of the price.

And Oberweis is great stuff... There's one in Oak Park now, downtown on Oak Park Ave. by North Blvd! When did that happen? I'm going to have to stop taking that route to see my girlfriend or I'm going to be very fat and very poor quickly.

:smile:

doublem23
08-09-2003, 01:53 AM
Oh, and I forgot to mention Charcoal Delights (or something like that)... It's on Foster by California (IIRC). Excellent food... They grill it on real wood once you order it. I like it a lot, but sometimes I don't think its the most sanitary joint.

Still worth a litte e-coli, IMO. :D:

maff
08-09-2003, 10:18 AM
Oh, and I forgot to mention Charcoal Delights (or something like that)...

Ahh...Charcoal Delights, some kids have their 8th grade graduation dinners at the Olive Garden, Applebees, or a Banquet Hall, I had mine at Charcoal Delights.

BTW--If anyone can help me out, I'm not sure how to credit people with quotes, if anyone could help it'd be appreciated.

voodoochile
08-09-2003, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by maff
Ahh...Charcoal Delights, some kids have their 8th grade graduation dinners at the Olive Garden, Applebees, or a Banquet Hall, I had mine at Charcoal Delights.

BTW--If anyone can help me out, I'm not sure how to credit people with quotes, if anyone could help it'd be appreciated.

Simply hit the http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/images/quote.gif in the bottom right hand corner of every post and the reply screen will popup with the quote already inserted.

maff
08-09-2003, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Simply hit the http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/images/quote.gif in the bottom right hand corner of every post and the reply screen will popup with the quote already inserted.

Heh, thanks vodoo.

Paulwny
08-09-2003, 11:25 AM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes


Chicken wings: They haven't been discussed yet. TRUE Buffalo wings are not breaded and have a hot orangish sauce just like at the Anchor Bar in the Nickel City, where they were invented. Wings are consumed with Bleu Cheese, celery and carrots. NO RANCH DRESSING!



Absolutely correct
Wing Etiquette : The wings are dipped into the Bleu Cheese and the celery and carrots are NEVER eaten until the wings have been devoured.
The celery and carrots are then used to consume the remaining Bleu Cheese and then cleanse and cool the mouth.

hsnterprize
08-09-2003, 12:05 PM
Somebody PUHLEEEEEEEEEESE make this a "stuck" topic. At this rate, WSI will be the only baseball-related website endorsed by the Food Network. I wonder if Emeril would ever come up to the Cell, sample some of the goodies, and make them himself on his show. Now THAT would be entertaining!!!!!

voodoochile
08-09-2003, 12:11 PM
Originally posted by hsnterprize
Somebody PUHLEEEEEEEEEESE make this a "stuck" topic. At this rate, WSI will be the only baseball-related website endorsed by the Food Network. I wonder if Emeril would ever come up to the Cell, sample some of the goodies, and make them himself on his show. Now THAT would be entertaining!!!!!

It doesn't need to be stuck. It hasn't been out of the top 10 most recent thread replys since it went up. I like the Emeril idea...

:emeril
"you always buy the hotdogs at the vendor's carts at "The Cell" because they load them with Kraut- BAM! and grilled onions - BAM! You can even do both BAM! BAM! Then you get the mustard from the dispenser - BAM! Good eating... Next show, funnel cakes and powdered sugar - delicious treat or just a good way to wreck your black clothes?

34 Inch Stick
08-09-2003, 12:16 PM
The Como Inn has been closed for almost two years now. Luxury townhomes have been built on the property.

You want a Taylor Street get together? Meet me at the 1st St. Ignatius football game in over 50 years on September 6. I think kickoff is around 10 a.m. Beer and brat tent opening at about the same time. After the game I'm sure the crowd will be looking for a noontime after hours party.

Paulwny
08-09-2003, 01:40 PM
I know it's not available in Chi; has anyone in their travels ever had a beef on weck ?

whitesoxwilkes
08-09-2003, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by Paulwny
I know it's not available in Chi; has anyone in their travels ever had a beef on weck ?

But of course! Many times while in Buffalo...they were never big in Rochester though. For all you non-WNYers, beef on weck is roast beef served on a Kimelweck roll...which is a doughy roll with caraway seeds and sea salt on top.

They are available in Chicago at BW3 on Lincoln, but are nowhere near as good as the real thing.

whitesoxwilkes
08-09-2003, 02:31 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
The Como Inn has been closed for almost two years now. Luxury townhomes have been built on the property.

You want a Taylor Street get together? Meet me at the 1st St. Ignatius football game in over 50 years on September 6. I think kickoff is around 10 a.m. Beer and brat tent opening at about the same time. After the game I'm sure the crowd will be looking for a noontime after hours party.

The Como Inn is gone, yes, but the brothers now have Como's on Grand as well as Galleria Marchetti, which is a fab upscale place for weddings where they display some of their Ferraris.

Paulwny
08-09-2003, 03:08 PM
Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
But of course! Many times while in Buffalo...they were never big in Rochester though. For all you non-WNYers, beef on weck is roast beef served on a Kimelweck roll...which is a doughy roll with caraway seeds and sea salt on top.

They are available in Chicago at BW3 on Lincoln, but are nowhere near as good as the real thing.

I forgot, you're originally from Rochester. You did forget, only horseradish is allowed on the beef.

rmusacch
08-09-2003, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
Now you're talkin'! Mushrooms are even better than Cross & Blackwell Steak Sauce...although I've even done both on occasion.

If your steak is cooked right with the right amount of flavoring, steak sauce is a sin.

rmusacch
08-09-2003, 03:18 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
I've always fought that little bit of Chicago snobbery. Born and raised in the Chicago area (okay, Maywood and LaGrange, but still...) I've always put both ketchup and mustard on my hotdogs. I like the way it tastes, and I refuse to let someone tell me how I have to eat my hotdogs in order to be a real Chicagoan. I do like a little dash of celery salt on my dogs though, and I don't think anyone outside of Chicago would ever think of that.

I agree with the ketchup comment. I have always put ketchup on my dogs.

MisterB
08-09-2003, 03:26 PM
Originally posted by doublem23
Also, Pierisi (sp?) on 63rd St. between Narragansett and Austin serves up a solid dog and they'll give you a nice pound of fries.

When I used to live in Summit, my family would routinely get meatball and italian beef sandwiches from Andrisi's at 63rd & Oak Park. Darn good sandwiches and the obligatory brown paper sacks of fries. Unortunately I didn't get a chance to stop in there my last trip back in April. A nice place for breakfast on a budget is Cafe Renee at 63rd & Naragansett, not the best quality but for the price it's pretty good.

Speaking of which: last time back I caught two Sox games, one of which was 'Drunken Idiot Jump-an-Ump Night' (the Dybas game) with 2 of my brothers and my mom. After the game we called in an order to Connie's Pizza and got there about 15 minutes before closing time. We had the place to ourselves and the staff was in no hurry to chase us out. The pizza was good and two pitchers later :gulp: , the pain of a horrible ballgame was soothed. There are undoubtedly better pizzas in the Chicago area, but even a bad Chicago pizza is better than 99% of the pizza you get here on the west coast.

rmusacch
08-09-2003, 04:00 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Best pancakes I ever ate (other than those made by my sainted mother), are the razor-thin ones served "all you can eat" at the Kirkwood Lodge in the Ozarks, Missouri. Ah... it's been 25 years but I can taste them like it was yesterday... barely one-quarter inch thick, yet not the least bit doughy tasting... lots of butter and animal fat already mixed in... piles and piles to eat with plenty of maple syrup ready at the table... nobody clogs an artery like rural Missouri. :smile:

Speaking of rural Missouri, anyone here ever been to Lambert's? We went there on the way to Chicago from Memphis when my grandpa died in 1988.

doublem23
08-09-2003, 08:57 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
The Como Inn has been closed for almost two years now. Luxury townhomes have been built on the property.

I know the Como Inn is gone, but there's a new place (apparently under the ownership of the old owner's son(s))... Ate there Thursday... Excellent food...

I forgot where the old one was, but the new one is at 695 N. Milwaukee (http://entertainment.metromix.chicagotribune.com/top/1,1419,M-Metromix-Home-!PlaceDetail-23170,00.html ).

QueerGirrl
08-10-2003, 12:09 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
There is a South Side fried chicken tradition called Harold's. There are about 50 of them or something scattered all over the south side. They deep fry their chicken and then cover it in Louisiana style hotsauce. It is unbelievably good and unbelievably bad for you. I may have to go get some from just thinking about it... drools...

Harold's was by far the best place to get fried chicken on the south side. Before I moved north that was my favorite junk food (which will probably explain my premature demise) and I couldn't go one week without it.

The best Harold's is on 113th and Vincennes, they made frying chicken gizzards an art form. There's also one on 63rd and Racine that was pretty good too.

There is a Harold's downtown on Wells street between Washington and Madison. I've been there a couple of times and it's good. Nothing makes me smile like fried okra.

StillMissOzzie
08-10-2003, 02:43 AM
This has been a fun thread to read through. Here are my random thoughts in no particular order:

Hot Dogs: NO CATSUP!! Mustard, onions, relish, 'maters, celery salt, sport peppers (in descending priority) I always liked 'em from Parky's, too, but the big draw there was the fries! Fresh cut spuds, freshly deep-fried, coming in the greasy brown paper bag. Too much!

Italian Beef: I used to live in Elmwood Park, walking distance from Johnnie's. I haven't been there in eons, so I'm sorry to learn it's under new ownership and (maybe) not as good anymore. Other favorites were Carm's, on Roosevelt in Berwyn and now that I've moved to the western 'burbs, Buona Beef. Sweet 'n hot pepers, please

Brats: Sauerkraut & mustard, preferably the dijon style

Corned Beef: Here, I actually like the yellow mustard better. BTW, inta, Horan's Snug is on the Forest Park side of Madison just west of Harlem. (I used to work there in that building as a kid before it became Horan's)

and with all of it, the beveridge of choice: :gulp:

whitesoxwilkes
08-10-2003, 08:52 AM
Originally posted by QueerGirrl

There is a Harold's downtown on Wells street between Washington and Madison. I've been there a couple of times and it's good. Nothing makes me smile like fried okra.

There's also one at Wabash and Balbo, within stumbling distance of the Casa De Wilkes.

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 09:41 AM
Wow...all this talk about food is making me hungry. Just a note before I start this rant...I'm thinking about writing a letter to Emeril Lagasse to ask him to do a show about Chicago food. He's done "tribute" shows on his "Emeril Live" program on the Food Network, and needless to say, he's pretty good. Within the letter, I'll put this website thread in so if he wants to, he can do a little research about our local culinary treats by read about them from those who know them best...Chicagoans. Let's face it...we all know that people from other parts of the country can "make" the foods we're in love with, but it's in Chicago where they're made the best. A "Chicago-Style" hotdog or pizza anywhere but Chicago, unless made by a Chicagoan, just doesn't seem right.

Anyway, as the title of this post indicates, my parents are from the south...that's southern part of the U.S. of A. (Louisiana), and if there's one thing I definitely know about cooking is that southerners do it best...bar none. There's just something magical about southern-style cooking, from the spicy tastes of simple dishes like fried chicken (in which the best does come from my mother), collard greens, and cast-iron skillet baked corn bread to more elaborate dishes with a southern flair that just excites me. Until a few years ago, Mrs. hsnterprize hadn't been further south than southern Illinois. We went to a family reunion in Mississippi and sampled some of the food there...she loved it. Even something as simple as a side bowl of grits with her breakfast was great. I'd been telling her, just like I'm telling you, that people in the south GENERALLY aren't in as much of a hurry as we are here in the north, so when they cook, they're allowed to take their time to prepare the food beautifully. Southerner's efforts in cooking are so great, that something as simple as scrambled eggs in the morning have a better taste to them down there...I can't explain it, but that's just fact.

Anyway, there's a place on Wabash just a few blocks south of the Columbia College (my alma mater) Wabash campus called the "Fish Hut". It's owned and run by a black church pastor (so there's no doubt that the food it good), and from the first day me and my girlfriend (now wife) went there, it was great. When she was there the first time, I taught her how to eat catfish steaks. You see...you can't just put a piece in your mouth like you can a piece of fish from Long John Silver's. There are little bones that may still be in the steak after the cooking process, so you have to eat the pieces slowly and carefully...otherwise, you'll have a bone stuck in the roof of your mouth, and it hurst like mad until you pull it out.

As far as the actual service is concerned, the portions are huge, and the food is made fresh to order. You can pick from fish like catfish and perch that is already cut and portioned so when you pick which one you want, it's breaded and deep-fried. And there are what I call "traditional black/southern" side dishes like spaghetti, corn bread, greens, and other "delicasies" that are often touted with black culture. If you are ever in the south Loop area, check the place out.

Personally, as far as chicken is concerned, other than my mom's cooking, Harold's Chicken Shack is also pretty great. Believe it or not, I also like Popeye's Chicken, too. Basically, any fried chicken place that has a black and/or southern flair to it appeals to me. Chicken is my favorite food, however, I'm not into buffalo wings.

I've already stated my preferences in the area of Italian Beef sandwiches...Parky's in Forest Park...and those fries they serve are the best. Connie's Pizza is neat...I can make my own deep-dish at home...not as good as Connie's, but it can compete. However, I REFUSE to eat at Gino's East...I ate there when their downtown Chicago location was near North Michigan Avenue, and the pizza was HORRIBLE. I'll stick up for Chicago-style pizza any day of the week...but I won't go to Gino's East if they were the last pizza place on earth. I'd rather go to Giordano's...but gimme a mom-and-pop pizza joint any day...they're the best. Waldo Cooney's on 51st street a few blocks west of Western Avenue serves great stuff if you're in the area.

Keep this thread going...it's awesome!!!!! Hopefully, Emeril will give Chicago food a chance on his show. And I'll make sure to let him know that even though Wrigley Field is the top baseball tourist attraction (and I'll stress TOURIST ATTRACTION) in this city, there's nothing like the food at U.S. Cellular Field and on the south side of Chicago.

TornLabrum
08-10-2003, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by hsnterprize
Wow...all this talk about food is making me hungry. Just a note before I start this rant...I'm thinking about writing a letter to Emeril Lagasse to ask him to do a show about Chicago food. He's done "tribute" shows on his "Emeril Live" program on the Food Network, and needless to say, he's pretty good. Within the letter, I'll put this website thread in so if he wants to, he can do a little research about our local culinary treats by read about them from those who know them best...Chicagoans. Let's face it...we all know that people from other parts of the country can "make" the foods we're in love with, but it's in Chicago where they're made the best. A "Chicago-Style" hotdog or pizza anywhere but Chicago, unless made by a Chicagoan, just doesn't seem right.

Anyway, as the title of this post indicates, my parents are from the south...that's southern part of the U.S. of A. (Louisiana), and if there's one thing I definitely know about cooking is that southerners do it best...bar none. There's just something magical about southern-style cooking, from the spicy tastes of simple dishes like fried chicken (in which the best does come from my mother), collard greens, and cast-iron skillet baked corn bread to more elaborate dishes with a southern flair that just excites me. Until a few years ago, Mrs. hsnterprize hadn't been further south than southern Illinois. We went to a family reunion in Mississippi and sampled some of the food there...she loved it. Even something as simple as a side bowl of grits with her breakfast was great. I'd been telling her, just like I'm telling you, that people in the south GENERALLY aren't in as much of a hurry as we are here in the north, so when they cook, they're allowed to take their time to prepare the food beautifully. Southerner's efforts in cooking are so great, that something as simple as scrambled eggs in the morning have a better taste to them down there...I can't explain it, but that's just fact.

Anyway, there's a place on Wabash just a few blocks south of the Columbia College (my alma mater) Wabash campus called the "Fish Hut". It's owned and run by a black church pastor (so there's no doubt that the food it good), and from the first day me and my girlfriend (now wife) went there, it was great. When she was there the first time, I taught her how to eat catfish steaks. You see...you can't just put a piece in your mouth like you can a piece of fish from Long John Silver's. There are little bones that may still be in the steak after the cooking process, so you have to eat the pieces slowly and carefully...otherwise, you'll have a bone stuck in the roof of your mouth, and it hurst like mad until you pull it out.

As far as the actual service is concerned, the portions are huge, and the food is made fresh to order. You can pick from fish like catfish and perch that is already cut and portioned so when you pick which one you want, it's breaded and deep-fried. And there are what I call "traditional black/southern" side dishes like spaghetti, corn bread, greens, and other "delicasies" that are often touted with black culture. If you are ever in the south Loop area, check the place out.

Personally, as far as chicken is concerned, other than my mom's cooking, Harold's Chicken Shack is also pretty great. Believe it or not, I also like Popeye's Chicken, too. Basically, any fried chicken place that has a black and/or southern flair to it appeals to me. Chicken is my favorite food, however, I'm not into buffalo wings.

I've already stated my preferences in the area of Italian Beef sandwiches...Parky's in Forest Park...and those fries they serve are the best. Connie's Pizza is neat...I can make my own deep-dish at home...not as good as Connie's, but it can compete. However, I REFUSE to eat at Gino's East...I ate there when their downtown Chicago location was near North Michigan Avenue, and the pizza was HORRIBLE. I'll stick up for Chicago-style pizza any day of the week...but I won't go to Gino's East if they were the last pizza place on earth. I'd rather go to Giordano's...but gimme a mom-and-pop pizza joint any day...they're the best. Waldo Cooney's on 51st street a few blocks west of Western Avenue serves great stuff if you're in the area.

Keep this thread going...it's awesome!!!!! Hopefully, Emeril will give Chicago food a chance on his show. And I'll make sure to let him know that even though Wrigley Field is the top baseball tourist attraction (and I'll stress TOURIST ATTRACTION) in this city, there's nothing like the food at U.S. Cellular Field and on the south side of Chicago.

Years and years ago my big brother and I used to go down to Louisiana during Christmas break to fish. That's when I first discovered red beans and rice. I'd been intrigued at the thought ever since I learned that Louis Armstrong (my personal musical hero) used to sign his letters, "Red beans and ricely, Louis Armstrong." Southern barbeque is also much better than anything you can get up here, and some of the best I've ever had was at this little hole in the wall somewhere in northwestern LA where you swatted the flies (in December) as you ordered at the counter.

Of all southern cuisine, the absolute best has to be from LA. And now suddenly I'm craving crawfish etouffe'!

I agree with you about Gino's East. Pizza is not pizza without sausage, and the sausage from Gino's literally makes me ill. I've never been to Lou Malnatti's but since he stole his recipe from Pizzeria Uno, I imagine it has to be great pizza. As far as I'm concerned it doesn't get better than Uno's. (I learned several years ago on some cooking show that the secret to the taste of the crust is that they use corn meal in it.)

I also fell in love years ago with Giordano's. We have one about a half mile down the street from where I live, so they get a lot of orders from the Labrum household.

Of the flat pizzas, I don't know which I like better, Connie's or Home Run Inn. Both are great. Out here in the burbs, Aurelio's is also good, especially if you like a lot of mozzarella on your pizza.

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 10:13 AM
Here's my e-mail to Emeril...I hope it represents us Chicagoans, as well as White Sox fans well...

Hi Emeril,

I'm a HUGE fan of your "Emeril Live" show on Food Network. I'm sure you've read and heard that a million times, so make this your "millionth and first". You combine great culinary skills with an entertaining style that makes anyone who's halfway interested in cooking want to watch you perform. I can't speak for the masses, but I can tell you for myself that you are a joy to watch.

I've seen you put on "tribute" shows for such places as New Orleans, Houston, and other parts of the country and world. While the cooking diversity is strong all over, let me make a suggestion...how about Chicago? Chicago, Illinois is home to some of the best restaraunts in the world, as well as some of the best local flavors a city can muster. Sure...something as simple as a hot dog, pizza, and a roast beef sandwich might not catch a world-class chef, but if you're into thinly-sliced beef with Italian spices placed in warm, fresh-backed french bread, or a pizza piled with with toppings made so uniquely, that chefs in other cities copy it, or a hot dog with a distinctively Chicago-style look and taste, then I suggest you think about the "City of Big Shoulders" a look. I've seen you make Chicago-style deep dish pizza on your show, but it would be nice to see you walk the streets of this great city. Whether you go to fancy restaraunts in downtown Chicago, or to small hot dog and fast food places on the north and south sides of the city, you'll learn that one thing we Chicagoans take much pride in is our food.

If I may, let me link you to a website that has a pretty interesting food-related thread to it. Even though the site itself isn't meant for food discussion, a thread popped up that has taken up a life of its own with food...not Chicago White Sox baseball, as the topic. The site is http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com , and the thread in the "WSI Message Boards" in the "Sox Clubhouse" is called, "Ketchup and Mustard". That thread started with a fan talking about how he had many hot dogs with him when struck with a foul ball, and the thread led into a discussion about how to top a hot dog and other food-related subjects. I even mentioned in a funny way how this site might be the only non-feed related site even endorsed by the Food Network. Anyway, I invite you, at your convenience, to click onto the following link, and see the posts for yourself...

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&threadid=22902

If the link doesn't work, then go to www.whitesoxinteractive.com, click on "Message Boards" on the left hand side of the homepage, then click on "Sox Clubhouse" on the page where people can view/post messages. In the "Clubhouse", look for the thread, "Ketchup and Mustard". I think you'll like what's there.

Emeril, thank you very much for your time. Keep up the great work, and continued success in your ventures. Hopefully, we Chicagoans will be blessed with an "Emeril's" here in the Windy City soon. Until then, keep "kickin' it up another notch!!!!!"

Sincerely,

Harlin S. Neal, Chicago, Illinois

Here's the link to Emeril's website if you want to learn more about him, his accomplishments, and if you want to write him. Who knows...maybe if there's enough pressure, he'll come to Chicago and learn a few things about our style of cooking. (http://www.emerils.com/emerilshome.html)

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 10:22 AM
Hey TornLabrum,

I can relate to you with the love of red beans and rice. That's another thing my mom is really good in making...I've learned from her about how to make it, but I just haven't done it yet. The best way to make it is to buy dry, red kidney beans, and allow them to soak overnight in a pot or bowl or something. Then in the morning (provided there's someone home at the time...or maybe in a slow-cooker) you cook them very slowly to allow the beans to break apart and make the think, sauce-like broth that comes from the dish. You can flavor them with hamhocks you buy from the local meat market. Also...spice them up really good with whatever spices you like. Just remember the trick to making good red beans and rice is SLOW COOKING. Don't expect to make a 5-minute microwave recipe to taste like they've been over the fire all day...it just won't work.

Going back to the pizza thing...Home Run Inn makes good flat pizza, but I think Giordano's is slightly better. There's a new Gio's coming up on 63rd and Cicero near Midway Airport, and I think that's going to be a great draw. With all the airport traffic up and down Cicero Avenue, it'll be a popular place...especially with Ford City Mall and all the other shopping places less than a mile south of that intersection.

I'd like to try some crawfish someday. Believe it or not, I haven't eaten in New Orleans before. I've been through there, but never eaten there. Hopefully, that'll change soon.

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 12:25 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
I've never been to Lou Malnatti's but since he stole his recipe from Pizzeria Uno, I imagine it has to be great pizza. As far as I'm concerned it doesn't get better than Uno's. (I learned several years ago on some cooking show that the secret to the taste of the crust is that they use corn meal in it.)
I

I read an article about "Chicago-style pizza: a few years back, and I believe it said that the real "Lou Malnati" worked for the guys who owned Uno's--in fact, Lou might even have put together the recipe. At any rate, they eventually went their separate ways back in the '60s, or early 70s, I believe, and at the time agreed that Uno's would have the city and Malnati could have the suburbs. Of course, that all went by the boards in the last 6-7 years. Don't hold me to exactitude with this--the article was, like I said, years ago but I believe the thrust of my memories are right.

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by QueerGirrl
There is a Harold's downtown on Wells street between Washington and Madison. I've been there a couple of times and it's good. Nothing makes me smile like fried okra.

Fried okra [insert Homer Simpson drooling/salivating noise here]--put the South in yo' mouth!! The Cracker Barrell chain also serves up decent fried okra and other Southern-style foods--not quite like Mama's, but h'it's good.

Paulwny
08-10-2003, 12:56 PM
My wife informed me that a few years ago Emeril did a show live from Chi. He was wearing a cubs shirt.

Kilroy
08-10-2003, 12:58 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
I've always fought that little bit of Chicago snobbery. Born and raised in the Chicago area (okay, Maywood and LaGrange, but still...) I've always put both ketchup and mustard on my hotdogs. I like the way it tastes, and I refuse to let someone tell me how I have to eat my hotdogs in order to be a real Chicagoan. I do like a little dash of celery salt on my dogs though, and I don't think anyone outside of Chicago would ever think of that.

Of course Nellie, making your own dog is a matter of taste. But, the definition of a "Chicago Style" hot dog is:

water brought to a boil, without dogs in, heat turned down, then dogs put in and cooked in the water. Poppy seed buns - steamed.

after dogs are ready, put dog in bun and then, in the following order:

mustard
onion
relish
tomato
pickle
hot peppers
celery salt

As much as I love Comiskey, you can't get a chicago style dog there. at the stands, the dogs are grilled. the vendors may have boiled dogs, but who really knows? And all they have is ketchup and mustard anyway.

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 01:12 PM
Originally posted by Paulwny
My wife informed me that a few years ago Emeril did a show live from Chi. He was wearing a cubs shirt. That's good that he's done a show from here before. However, he needs to come back with something we Sox fans can relate with...no sCrUBS shirt.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-10-2003, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by Kilroy
...As much as I love Comiskey, you can't get a chicago style dog there. at the stands, the dogs are grilled. the vendors may have boiled dogs, but who really knows? And all they have is ketchup and mustard anyway.

Good point. The Sox really ought to set up a Vienna hot dog stand someplace on the concourse. Out in centerfield would seem to be a great location, maybe with a red and yellow roof top with a revolving sign that said "Have one, Daley!" :smile:

They ought to do something to upgrade their Italian beef, combo, and meatball sandwiches, too. Though I appreciate their availability at the ballpark, I've always found the taste and quality lacking.

hsnterprize
08-10-2003, 02:05 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
Wow, who'd've thunk that my near-foul-ball experience would morph into a 1000+ view, horrendously off-topic gabfest?

(And no, I'm not complaining. I find it quite humorous, actually.)

:) Just imagine what would've happened if you caught that ball. Yes...you'd have a souvenir, but this luscious food thread would be non-existent. Besides...I told Emeril about this thread. I don't think he's up for the White Sox. Too must Boston in him.

TornLabrum
08-10-2003, 05:27 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
I read an article about "Chicago-style pizza: a few years back, and I believe it said that the real "Lou Malnati" worked for the guys who owned Uno's--in fact, Lou might even have put together the recipe. At any rate, they eventually went their separate ways back in the '60s, or early 70s, I believe, and at the time agreed that Uno's would have the city and Malnati could have the suburbs. Of course, that all went by the boards in the last 6-7 years. Don't hold me to exactitude with this--the article was, like I said, years ago but I believe the thrust of my memories are right.

The original recipe for Uno's pizza was put together by Ric Riccardo, who was to be Ike Sewell's partner in the pizza venture but who for some reason went in another direction. Riccardo owned more than one restaurant in Chicago at various times. I read a story decades ago in the Sun-Times that told the whole story. As I recall, one part of it is that Sewell wanted to start a Mexican place but Riccardo, wanted to develop a pizza recipe, I think because he fell in love with pizza in Italy during the war. It's all very vague to me after so many years, but I think those are the basics as to the origin of Pizzeria Uno.

Malnati was brought in to run the restaurant, and of course he took the recipe with him when he decided to go out on his own.

Since there aren't any Malnati's around here, I go to Uno's every chance I get. Pretty easy shot up the Stevenson.

rmusacch
08-10-2003, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
The original recipe for Uno's pizza was put together by Ric Riccardo, who was to be Ike Sewell's partner in the pizza venture but who for some reason went in another direction. Riccardo owned more than one restaurant in Chicago at various times. I read a story decades ago in the Sun-Times that told the whole story. As I recall, one part of it is that Sewell wanted to start a Mexican place but Riccardo, wanted to develop a pizza recipe, I think because he fell in love with pizza in Italy during the war. It's all very vague to me after so many years, but I think those are the basics as to the origin of Pizzeria Uno.

Malnati was brought in to run the restaurant, and of course he took the recipe with him when he decided to go out on his own.

Since there aren't any Malnati's around here, I go to Uno's every chance I get. Pretty easy shot up the Stevenson.

My parents laugh when people say that deep dish pizza is Chicago style pizza. My mom said she never had deep dish pizza until we moved and went to a Pizzeria Uno's somewhere.

Procol Harum
08-10-2003, 08:37 PM
Originally posted by rmusacch
My parents laugh when people say that deep dish pizza is Chicago style pizza. My mom said she never had deep dish pizza until we moved and went to a Pizzeria Uno's somewhere.

True enough--growing up in the area in the '60s all the pizza I remember was the classic CHicago-style thin crust :smile: usually w/ sausage. The closest I ever had to "Chicago-style" was at my Sicilian friend's house and although I liked it, it sure seemed weird at the time.

Another thought, a friend and I were chatting the other night and we seemed to recollect that "back in the day" almost everybody in the Chicago area went with sausage pizza--nowadays that's apparently changing. My friend asked the manager of the local Giordano's what the sausage vs. pepperoni breakdown was at his place and was told that in terms of thin-crust his store sold probably five pizzas w/ pepperoni for every sausage. We were both quite surprised. Now, of course, this was in St. Charles, but still--it would seem that East Coast preferences and media push have made a big dent in recent decades.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-10-2003, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by rmusacch
My parents laugh when people say that deep dish pizza is Chicago style pizza. My mom said she never had deep dish pizza until we moved and went to a Pizzeria Uno's somewhere.

I would never claim to be an expert in this area, but isn't this precisely how all regional culture begins? Somebody from somewhere innovates something new that proves so popular, a raft of imitators quickly move in with something similar. These imitators can't very well use the innovator's name, so it becomes "<insert regional name here>-style X."

For example, New York style hotdogs started with Nathan's, but everyone today makes them "New York-style." Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters electrify southern reels, and suddenly there are a half-dozen labels recording "Chicago Blues." Cafe du Monde starts serving beignets in the French Quarters, and now "New Orleans-style" beignets can be found everywhere. Etcetera, etcetera.

I grew up in Chicago Heights which ought to have been filled with deep-dish pizzerias if you believe Chicago's Italian-Americans have a corner on Chicago-style pizza. But that's simply not the case at all. The innovators came from elsewhere.

TornLabrum
08-10-2003, 11:14 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
I would never claim to be an expert in this area, but isn't this precisely how all regional culture begins? Somebody from somewhere innovates something new that proves so popular, a raft of imitators quickly move in with something similar. These imitators can't very well use the innovator's name, so it becomes "<insert regional name here>-style X."

For example, New York style hotdogs started with Nathan's, but everyone today makes them "New York-style." Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters electrify southern reels, and suddenly there are a half-dozen labels recording "Chicago Blues." Cafe du Monde starts serving beignets in the French Quarters, and now "New Orleans-style" beignets can be found everywhere. Etcetera, etcetera.

I grew up in Chicago Heights which ought to have been filled with deep-dish pizzerias if you believe Chicago's Italian-Americans have a corner on Chicago-style pizza. But that's simply not the case at all. The innovators came from elsewhere.

You can probably get away with calling deep dish pizza "Chicago style," though, since that's where it was invented. There was no deep dish pizza before Uno's.

DSpivack
08-11-2003, 12:21 AM
I thought I'd never get to the end of this wonderful thread. Of course, the end is only relative. What a wonderful thing. Chicago has some of the best, well, I won't call it junk food because it's certainly not junk, and it can't be called fast food because that sounds like mcdonald's or something similarly disgusting.
Pizza. Hot Dogs. Italian Beef. Harold's. And more that I just can't think of right now. Also, being native to Evanston, I am partial to the buffalo wings [and by the descriptions they are true buffalo wings] at Buffalo Joe's, and the ribs at Merle's; they might not be the best, but they are sure are good. Hot Dogs I go to Fluky's or Wolfy's, and remember when Poochie's was the
best. But that is also because I live near them; there are regional foods, and there are our preferences to where we live within the Chicago area.
Going to school near Atlanta [Oxford College of Emory Univ.], I have only recently begun to appreciate southern food. [and that's more than Dixie Kitchen, but even that is still pretty good, especially for Chicago, along with Wishbone] But you just can't get a good hot dog or good pizza in or around Atlanta, that I know of. [though there is a place advertising "Chicago" hot dogs across the street from the entrance of Emory, and if my memory serves me right, I think there are Vienna. If so it is a travesty I haven't been there yet.]
Ah, I'm in a good mood. Chicago food, the White Sox. A great game that I went to today, plus the last two games I've been to have sat in upper deck, as I hadn't been to since game 6 in 1993. And I kind of like it. Sure beats most stadiums.
Well, this was a rather lengthy post to say the least, but man, this is a truly classic thread.

SoxxoS
08-11-2003, 08:23 AM
I am probably the weirdest eater of all time that is not a complete vegan.-

I never had a hot dog in my life.

I like pancakes and waffles with chocolate chips.

I prefer thin pancakes to thick, but prefer belgium waffles overall. Original Pancake house in Wilmette takes the cake here.

I love pan pizza, however, just cheese. Lou Mal's is the best in the city.

I eat grilled chicken sandwiches 14 times a week plain with BBQ sauce on the side.

Just throught I would throw that out there, especially the "hot dog" part.

34 Inch Stick
08-11-2003, 09:24 AM
Never had a hot dog? Gentlemen I believe we have a Taliban spy in our midst.

To boil (as opposed to grill) this thread down to a single post let me tell you about my gastronomic weekend. I went to the Erie Cafe for dinner on Friday. I had the strip medium. Good but not great. I have to say that I am not going to give into other people's opinions on cooking steak any more. I ordered it medium. I know medium rare is the classic. However, I like it medium well. I like my steak just a little pink and I am not afraid to say it anymore. The thing I will rave about was the grilled calamari. I am a huge fan or grilled calamari (I hate it fried). This was as good as I have ever had.

Saturday I ordered a pizza from Rosati's and watched the football game. Half peperoni half sausage, onion and mushroom. Again good, not great. I live near Lou Malnati's in Lincolnwood. I should have taken the drive to pick it up but I was too lazy.

Sunday morning we went to breakfast after 9:30 mass. I was looking for a place to eat in the Clark and Foster area. After walking up and down Clark for a while I stopped in a place called Svea (I think it means Swedish). I had the Viking breakfast which included Swedish pancakes. Very good.

I wanted to grill Polish sausage on Sunday night but my wife would not let me live my life according to a thread on the internet.

I did work out preety hard both Friday and Saturday so I don't feel completely bloated today. However, I am at my desk this morning looking like a happy Buddha.

Procol Harum
08-11-2003, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
I wanted to grill Polish sausage on Sunday night but my wife would not let me live my life according to a thread on the internet.

LOL!! I wonder how many of us pigged out on faves this past weekend because of this thread! I know that in my case it was a trip to Flip's in Glen Ellyn on Saturday evening for a good Italian Beef w/ sweet peppers.

Then after church on Sunday I just had to get some Southern-style eats so sons # 2 & 3 and I headed to the Cracker Barrel where I took advantage of their "country vegetable plate", choosing pinto beans, fried okra, turnip greens, country-style green beans (read: cooked with salt pork or bacon), hashbrowns and fried apples. All accompanied with a biscuit and corn muffin. Mighty satisfyin' for this old ridgerunner.

TornLabrum
08-11-2003, 11:07 AM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
LOL!! I wonder how many of us pigged out on faves this past weekend because of this thread!

I decided to try something I hadn't before this time around. At hsnterprize's recommendation, I decided to try the "thin" crust pizza (and I use the word "thin" advisedly) at Giordano's last night after the game. (My way of making up to my wife all the time I spend at The Cell.

The toppings reminded me of Aurelio's, but the crust is exactly the same as with the stuffed pizza. Good stuff!

TornLabrum
08-11-2003, 11:09 AM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Then after church on Sunday I just had to get some Southern-style eats so sons # 2 & 3 and I headed to the Cracker Barrel where I took advantage of their "country vegetable plate", choosing pinto beans, fried okra, turnip greens, country-style green beans (read: cooked with salt pork or bacon), hashbrowns and fried apples. All accompanied with a biscuit and corn muffin. Mighty satisfyin' for this old ridgerunner.

Speaking of southern food, I'm in heaven when I'm eating chicken fried steak (on many menus nowadays as "country" fried steak) with white gravy. Cracker Barrel has a good one.

TornLabrum
08-11-2003, 11:11 AM
I just thought of something that used to be a Chicago area treat that as far as I know, you can't get anymore. When Walgreen's used to have a counter and some tables and chairs to eat at, they used to have a terrific strawberry pie. For several years, as they shut down the counters in the stores, they opened up a restaurant chain, Wag's, and that's where you could get the pie.

Unfortunately as far as I know, when they closed down that branch of the business, the great strawberry pie disappeared.

voodoochile
08-11-2003, 11:19 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
I decided to try something I hadn't before this time around. At hsnterprize's recommendation, I decided to try the "thin" crust pizza (and I use the word "thin" advisedly) at Giordano's last night after the game. (My way of making up to my wife all the time I spend at The Cell.

The toppings reminded me of Aurelio's, but the crust is exactly the same as with the stuffed pizza. Good stuff!

Aurelio's makes the best thin crust pizza in the world, IMO. There are several of them around the city, but the original (Tinley Park) started out in an old house. They bought other houses beside it and connected them. Now it is a sprawling wonder of a restaurant. Try the "Super 7" or whatever it is called with 7 toppings of Aurilio's choosing including canadian bacon. Unbelievably good. Haven't had one in a while this may call for a road trip.

TornLabrum
08-11-2003, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Aurelio's makes the best thin crust pizza in the world, IMO. There are several of them around the city, but the original (Tinley Park) started out in an old house. They bought other houses beside it and connected them. Now it is a sprawling wonder of a restaurant. Try the "Super 7" or whatever it is called with 7 toppings of Aurilio's choosing including canadian bacon. Unbelievably good. Haven't had one in a while this may call for a road trip.

My favorite thin crust pizza of all time is in DeKalb at Pizza Villa. Been eating that stuff for 35 years now.

Procol Harum
08-11-2003, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
I just thought of something that used to be a Chicago area treat that as far as I know, you can't get anymore. When Walgreen's used to have a counter and some tables and chairs to eat at, they used to have a terrific strawberry pie. For several years, as they shut down the counters in the stores, they opened up a restaurant chain, Wag's, and that's where you could get the pie.


I remember those pies--very similar to what are served at a number of chains further east like Elby's in IN, OH, PA.

I miss Wag's--there used to be one in Carol Stream (which is now a pretty good pancake joint, actually--Red Apple Pancake House). At any rate Wag's had good breakfast fare and for lunch and dinner they would give you decent food and plenty of it for a real reasonable price. Much preferred Wag's to Denny's and other comparable chains in that tier.

Procol Harum
08-11-2003, 12:31 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Aurelio's makes the best thin crust pizza in the world, IMO. There are several of them around the city, but the original (Tinley Park) started out in an old house.

Never had any, but thou makest me wonder about the feasability of a road trip--do you know if they have any joints out more in the direction o' DuPage?

maurice
08-11-2003, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by doublem23
if you want good Italian food, I'd recommend the Como on Milwaukee Ave over by Ogden and Grand.

Como is a smaller spin-off of the Como Inn, a Chicago classic that recently was demolished to make room for yuppie housing. Como is a mere shadow of its former self. Belle Notte on Grand, and RoSal's on Taylor are head and shoulders above the numerous over-hyped Italian restaurants west of downtown.

maurice
08-11-2003, 01:02 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Aurelio's makes the best thin crust pizza in the world.

I don't know about that. I know a place near the Vatican that kicks their butt.

:)

jabrch
08-11-2003, 01:14 PM
Originally posted by maurice
Como is a smaller spin-off of the Como Inn, a Chicago classic that recently was demolished to make room for yuppie housing. Como is a mere shadow of its former self. Belle Notte on Grand, and RoSal's on Taylor are head and shoulders above the numerous over-hyped Italian restaurants west of downtown.

Belle Notte is awesome.... Their Voldka sauce is amongst the best in town. I also like Canella's on Grand if you like more plain, traditional Italian. Also, Papa Milanos is a Chicago classic.

Dadawg_77
08-11-2003, 01:49 PM
What haven't seen is Al's Beef down on Taylor by UIC, and for us north siders, Roma's. Use to give them out on Score for the Whats your beef segment.

cheeses_h_rice
08-11-2003, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by Dadawg_77
What haven't seen is Al's Beef down on Taylor by UIC, and for us north siders, Roma's. Use to give them out on Score for the Whats your beef segment.

I just moved to the NW side, not too far from Cicero. I've seen a new Roma's around Berteau and Cicero, and also the original restaurant up further north, about 5000-6000 North or so -- which one would you recommend, or are they both about the same?

34 Inch Stick
08-11-2003, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by maurice
I don't know about that. I know a place near the Vatican that kicks their butt.

:)

And there is another one next to the main train station in Rome that will give you a huge hunk of great pizza for a low price to take on those long train trips.

voodoochile
08-11-2003, 02:26 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Never had any, but thou makest me wonder about the feasability of a road trip--do you know if they have any joints out more in the direction o' DuPage?

I have no idea where DuPage is, but there are Aurelio's all over the SW suburbs if that helps. I know there is one in Addison near the Marcus Movie Theater out that way. Check the Yellow Pages, or call 411. They should be able to help you. Heck, they may even have a website, everyone else does these days...

Aurelios in Oak Brook Terrace (http://www.aptogo.com/)

Don't know if that helps or not...

Eddie Gaedel
08-11-2003, 02:46 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Aurelio's makes the best thin crust pizza in the world, IMO. There are several of them around the city, but the original (Tinley Park) started out in an old house. They bought other houses beside it and connected them. Now it is a sprawling wonder of a restaurant. Try the "Super 7" or whatever it is called with 7 toppings of Aurilio's choosing including canadian bacon. Unbelievably good. Haven't had one in a while this may call for a road trip.

Aurelio's sucks! The cheese is always overcooked and hard. Sanfratello's in Glenwood is still the best thin crust pizza in the Chicagoland area, and for deep dish it's gotta be Arrenello's (also in Glenwood).

voodoochile
08-11-2003, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by Eddie Gaedel
Aurelio's sucks! The cheese is always overcooked and hard. Sanfratello's in Glenwood is still the best thin crust pizza in the Chicagoland area, and for deep dish it's gotta be Arrenello's (also in Glenwood).

Never had that happen to me a single time at Aurelio's, so maybe you should try a different location...

Eddie Gaedel
08-11-2003, 04:08 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Never had that happen to me a single time at Aurelio's, so maybe you should try a different location...

I've gone to the original in Homewood. I live in the city now, so except for trips to Sanfratello's I usually buy pizza from Lucky Vito's or Congress Pizza (both are on Milwaukee Ave just north of Armatige).

Procol Harum
08-11-2003, 05:23 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I have no idea where DuPage is, but there are Aurelio's all over the SW suburbs if that helps. I know there is one in Addison near the Marcus Movie Theater out that way. Check the Yellow Pages, or call 411. They should be able to help you. Heck, they may even have a website, everyone else does these days...

Aurelios in Oak Brook Terrace (http://www.aptogo.com/)

Don't know if that helps or not...

Both are DuPage locations, although, unfortunately, a bit of a drive for me. Still, the Addison location sounds very promising in combo with a trip to the Marcus movie palace out yonder. Use the Yellow Pages to look for a restaurant...when ya got WSI? :cool:

Dadawg_77
08-11-2003, 05:30 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
I just moved to the NW side, not too far from Cicero. I've seen a new Roma's around Berteau and Cicero, and also the original restaurant up further north, about 5000-6000 North or so -- which one would you recommend, or are they both about the same?

Not sure how new the Berteau location is, that is the one I have always gone to, and that is about 20 years or so. I think it always been there. I used to live at Addison and Ciecero with my Ps.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-11-2003, 08:57 PM
Originally posted by Eddie Gaedel
Aurelio's sucks! The cheese is always overcooked and hard. Sanfratello's in Glenwood is still the best thin crust pizza in the Chicagoland area, and for deep dish it's gotta be Arrenello's (also in Glenwood).

Wow. A real south suburbanite! I'm proud to say I've eaten all three of the pizzas Eddie mentions. Though they all hold a special place in my heart (I practically grew up on this stuff in the late-70's/early-80's), I have to give Aurelio's higher marks than either of the other two. That's not a knock on the other two; I miss eating them, too.

There used to be a hole in the wall down in Steger called the Sicilian Cart. They made a thick crust that was to die for. They've been out of business for close to 20 years now and I still remember it like yesterday. And for all the Bloom and Marian Catholic grads, who can forget Alferno's on Joe Orr Road & Dixie Highway? They turned it into a funeral home, which is probably just as well. :smile:

Also for Procol... I had an Aurelios pizza from the restaurant in Oak Brook Terrace a couple weeks ago. You owe to yourself to give it a try!

Paulwny
08-12-2003, 09:50 AM
From some show on the Travel Channel early last night, Chicago consumes more twinkies per capita then any other city.
You guys should throw away the twinkies and eat the cellophane wrapper, it may have more nutrients.

Procol Harum
08-12-2003, 01:44 PM
Originally posted by Paulwny
From some show on the Travel Channel early last night, Chicago consumes more twinkies per capita then any other city.
You guys should throw away the twinkies and eat the cellophane wrapper, it may have more nutrients.

Mmmmmm, Twinkies...although I'm convinced the recipe was changed years ago--they're much gummier than they used to be back in the day. Suzy Q's--now there's a treat burstin' with nutrition and health!!

Eddie Gaedel
08-12-2003, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
And for all the Bloom and Marian Catholic grads...

H-F, class of '89.

I used to go to Ariston's (sp?) on Dixie Hwy for gyros. mmm...gyros.

voodoochile
08-12-2003, 03:09 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Mmmmmm, Twinkies...although I'm convinced the recipe was changed years ago--they're much gummier than they used to be back in the day. Suzy Q's--now there's a treat burstin' with nutrition and health!!

I've always been a Ho-Ho man, and the Little Debbies versions are even better.

Eddie Gaedel
08-12-2003, 03:49 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Mmmmmm, Twinkies...although I'm convinced the recipe was changed years ago--they're much gummier than they used to be back in the day.

I remember about 3-4 years back there was a giant twinkie pyramid and navy pier. I think it was made out of around 20,000 of them. after the unveiling, the twinkie cowboy was throwing twinkies to the masses. I ate about ten of them! brrrp! :D:

There was also a 'Family Guy' episode where Peter tries to get his son, Chris, to lose weight by putting a twinkie on the end of a stick and having him run after it. When Chris finally figures out how to get the twinkie he says to it, "I'm gonna turn you into poo!". I know how he felt.

Mo308oM
08-12-2003, 04:35 PM
Originally posted by cheeses_h_rice
So I was sitting in section 335 tonight, courtesy of a work acquaintance of my wife's, and had the best chances of getting a foul ball I've ever had at new Comiskey. Apparently one ball hit the seat I was to sit in in the first inning just before we arrived. Then another ball landed in my row about 5 seats away from me. And lastly, just after we had gotten food, and my lap was filled up, with a kosher dog in one tray, and another tray with big pools of ketchup and mustard on it, someone on the Royals loops a foul ball right to my row, one seat away from me. All of us had food on our laps -- nachos, dogs, etc. -- and we all just froze. If I hadn't had so much delicately-balanced food to deal with, I so easily could have reached out and grabbed the ball on its arc downward. Instead, we all sort of panicked and just sat there. it hit a girl in our party on the side/butt, bounced back, and a little girl behind us grabbed it.

Man. Talk about bad timing. Those darned condiments.

One of these days, I'll get a ball at Comiskey. One of these days.

:)

bah! id be so mad! on my off day in april, me, my ex bf and best friendsi went to a game. we sat rt next in the 'fair section' rt next to the left field foul pole. in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd innings a ball went into the foul section and the same kid caught the balls each time.. so by the 3rd inning he caught 3 balls and gotten one earlier from someone in the sox bullpen- so thats what 4 balls...

then carlos lee came up to bat and i was like "DUDE CARLOS HIT IT TO ME" and he hit a homerun, RT TO US.. i stood up all prepared to catch it and it bounced off my hand and landed behind us... me and my best friend dove over trying to get it and some big dude grabbed it from my hands. i was SO MAD... if only my bf had moved his @ss over i woulda had it for sure...

funny thing was that kid that caught the balls was trying to get this one too.. its like DIDNT U GET ENUF BASEBALLS FOR ONE GAME ALREADY?

southsidegirl
08-12-2003, 04:46 PM
When I was really little I would go with my family to Aurelios(the one in Villa Park, or maybe it's Lombard)all the time. The food there is great, especially the salad and breadsticks. The pizza there is really good, too. To bad I live in Wheaton now and there isn't an Aurelios nearby.

34 Inch Stick
08-12-2003, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by Mo308oM
bah! id be so mad! on my off day in april, me, my ex bf and best friendsi went to a game. we sat rt next in the 'fair section' rt next to the left field foul pole. in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd innings a ball went into the foul section and the same kid caught the balls each time.. so by the 3rd inning he caught 3 balls and gotten one earlier from someone in the sox bullpen- so thats what 4 balls...

then carlos lee came up to bat and i was like "DUDE CARLOS HIT IT TO ME" and he hit a homerun, RT TO US.. i stood up all prepared to catch it and it bounced off my hand and landed behind us... me and my best friend dove over trying to get it and some big dude grabbed it from my hands. i was SO MAD... if only my bf had moved his @ss over i woulda had it for sure...

funny thing was that kid that caught the balls was trying to get this one too.. its like DIDNT U GET ENUF BASEBALLS FOR ONE GAME ALREADY?

How dare you steal this thread and take it off on a tangent.

Dadawg_77
08-12-2003, 05:37 PM
Originally posted by Eddie Gaedel
I remember about 3-4 years back there was a giant twinkie pyramid and navy pier. I think it was made out of around 20,000 of them. after the unveiling, the twinkie cowboy was throwing twinkies to the masses. I ate about ten of them! brrrp! :D:

There was also a 'Family Guy' episode where Peter tries to get his son, Chris, to lose weight by putting a twinkie on the end of a stick and having him run after it. When Chris finally figures out how to get the twinkie he says to it, "I'm gonna turn you into poo!". I know how he felt.

Also the episode where the bombs go off and Peter founds a new city at the Twinkie factory with all his mutated nieghbors.

maurice
08-12-2003, 06:10 PM
:tomatoaward :tomatoaward

Bucktown
08-12-2003, 07:22 PM
Originally posted by southsidegirl
When I was really little I would go with my family to Aurelios(the one in Villa Park, or maybe it's Lombard)all the time. The food there is great, especially the salad and breadsticks. The pizza there is really good, too. To bad I live in Wheaton now and there isn't an Aurelios nearby.
Their pizza sauce is really sweet. I did not like it at first, but it is an acquired taste that I have grown to love.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-12-2003, 09:43 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I've always been a Ho-Ho man, and the Little Debbies versions are even better.

You prefer the Little Debbies version??? What part of the South are you from? :smile:

I want to know who here has ever eaten a Moon Pie? I'm bettin' everyone on the Atlanta Braves message board raises their hand. :D:

Gawd, they look a chewy greasy mess...

voodoochile
08-12-2003, 09:58 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
You prefer the Little Debbies version??? What part of the South are you from? :smile:

I want to know who here has ever eaten a Moon Pie? I'm bettin' everyone on the Atlanta Braves message board raises their hand. :D:

Gawd, they look a chewy greasy mess...

No Moon Pies, but I love the oatmeal sandwiches. Yum. $0.99 for a box of 10 at Dominicks last time I checked.

I'm a firm believer in getting a deal whenever possible...

doublem23
08-13-2003, 12:52 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
My favorite thin crust pizza of all time is in DeKalb at Pizza Villa. Been eating that stuff for 35 years now.

I prefer Father & Son's thin crust pizza. There's one on Milwaukee Ave. in the Northwest reaches of the city. Yum!

TornLabrum
08-13-2003, 08:37 AM
Another very good pizza (not to mention excellent pasta dishes): Salerno's in Joliet (formerly in Berwyn). If you're not in the mood for pizza, try the linguini with calamari.

QueerGirrl
08-13-2003, 08:53 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
You prefer the Little Debbies version??? What part of the South are you from? :smile:

I want to know who here has ever eaten a Moon Pie? I'm bettin' everyone on the Atlanta Braves message board raises their hand. :D:

Gawd, they look a chewy greasy mess...


I've had a couple in my day. But my mom loves them! She doesn't eat them anymore because of her diet but back in the day, those Moon Pies were always in pantry.

QueerGirrl
08-13-2003, 08:55 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
No Moon Pies, but I love the oatmeal sandwiches. Yum. $0.99 for a box of 10 at Dominicks last time I checked.

I'm a firm believer in getting a deal whenever possible...

How about the Fudge Rounds and the Dunkin Stix. They are soooo good (and good for you!)

Procol Harum
08-13-2003, 09:13 AM
Moon Pies--unpretentious, inexpensive, and yummy in a true, all-American fashion. However, go with the original--do not accept smaller, cheaper rip-offs like "Scooter Pies."

Voo--you're a good man. Those Little Debbie "Swiss Rolls" are the bomb--$1.09 a box, man, you can't beat that with a stick! Compare to the overly sweet, icing-heavy Ho-Hos which run something like $3 a box--Little Debbie wins hand downs.

Little Debbies are a wonder--so much for so little. The Oatmeal creme cookies are delish, and as QG points out, so are the Dunkin' Stix (never had the Fudge Rounds). Also a big thumbs up to Nutty Bars, Zebra Cakes, and the Apple Oatmeal cookies.

whitesoxwilkes
08-13-2003, 09:29 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
No Moon Pies, but I love the oatmeal sandwiches. Yum. $0.99 for a box of 10 at Dominicks last time I checked.

I'm a firm believer in getting a deal whenever possible...

Once, while under the influence of a foreign but natural substance while in college I ate a whole box of them.

voodoochile
08-13-2003, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Moon Pies--unpretentious, inexpensive, and yummy in a true, all-American fashion. However, go with the original--do not accept smaller, cheaper rip-offs like "Scooter Pies."

Voo--you're a good man. Those Little Debbie "Swiss Rolls" are the bomb--$1.09 a box, man, you can't beat that with a stick! Compare to the overly sweet, icing-heavy Ho-Hos which run something like $3 a box--Little Debbie wins hand downs.

Little Debbies are a wonder--so much for so little. The Oatmeal creme cookies are delish, and as QG points out, so are the Dunkin' Stix (never had the Fudge Rounds). Also a big thumbs up to Nutty Bars, Zebra Cakes, and the Apple Oatmeal cookies.

I can't eat Moon Pies after seeing Green Mile, but the rest I agree with...

Originally posted by whitesoxwilkes
Once, while under the influence of a foreign but natural substance while in college I ate a whole box of them.

Been there done that. They are great if you keep them in the fridge...

doublem23
08-13-2003, 03:44 PM
The Little Debbie's Strawberry Shortcake Rolls are heavenly; except they're so full of sugar you can sometimes feel your pancreas go into overdrive.

Dadawg_77
08-13-2003, 03:48 PM
Man it is all about Nutty Bars. They are shiznitz of junk food. Peanut Butter, Chocolate and waffers, thats is what I am talking about.

Paulwny
08-13-2003, 04:19 PM
Originally posted by Dadawg_77
Man it is all about Nutty Bars. They are shiznitz of junk food. Peanut Butter, Chocolate and waffers, thats is what I am talking about.

Absolutely the best !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

PaleHoseGeorge
08-13-2003, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by Dadawg_77
Man it is all about Nutty Bars. They are shiznitz of junk food. Peanut Butter, Chocolate and waffers, thats is what I am talking about.

Who makes these? I'm obviously out of the loop on what are the newest greatest chocolate confections.

Pfft... Nestle 100000 bars...

whitesoxwilkes
08-13-2003, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Who makes these? I'm obviously out of the loop on what are the newest greatest chocolate confections.

Pfft... Nestle 100000 bars...

Little Debbie. I like 'em too.

voodoochile
08-13-2003, 05:49 PM
Broke down and bought a dozen Oatmeal Cream Pies just now. They are chilling in the fridge awaiting their destiny...

You know that's the same destiny that Custer suffered. They have no idea what is in store for them and are just sitting there thinking, "Wow, this guy is nicer than the store owner. He gives us air-conditioning." :D:

Nellie_Fox
08-15-2003, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by rmusacch
My parents laugh when people say that deep dish pizza is Chicago style pizza. My mom said she never had deep dish pizza until we moved and went to a Pizzeria Uno's somewhere. Me too. Nobody ever heard of a deep-dish pizza in Chicago before Pizzeria Uno. My idea of Chicago style is thin, crisp crust. The crisp is what separated us from the soggy, drippy, New York style pizza.

My favorite when I was growing up was Johnny's in LaGrange Park, 31st and LaGrange Rd. Eventually, Alex (from Johnny's) opened his own place in Brookfield, "Alex & Aldo's." I wonder if they're still open?

Now having finished wading throught the rest of the thread (been out of town all week) I'll add that if you live in DuPage, and want a pizza that you'll eat until you want to puke, go to Pieroni's, 87th and Modaff in Naperville. You can't get a bite that doesn't have sausage (assuming, of course, that you order cheese and sausage.)

By the way, have you ever ordered a cheese and sausage outside of Chicago? They first give you a blank look, then ask if you want extra cheese. When you say no, they ask why you ordered cheese and sausage then, because all the pizzas have cheese.

TornLabrum
08-15-2003, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
Me too. Nobody ever heard of a deep-dish pizza in Chicago before Pizzeria Uno. My idea of Chicago style is thin, crisp crust. The crisp is what separated us from the soggy, drippy, New York style pizza.

My favorite when I was growing up was Johnny's in LaGrange Park, 31st and LaGrange Rd. Eventually, Alex (from Johnny's) opened his own place in Brookfield, "Alex & Aldo's." I wonder if they're still open?

Pizzeria Uno opened during WWII. Unless you're as old as my big brother, that means it was around before you were born. It was the first deep dish pizza. It was made in Chicago. As somebody mentioned, rather than plugging Uno's, which is a franchise now, people in other cities probably called it "Chicago Style Pizza" as a way of distinguishing it from some other style.

At this point, your idea of what is Chicago style pizza is pretty much irrelevant because of what the world thinks of as Chicago style pizza.

Nellie_Fox
08-16-2003, 12:00 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
At this point, your idea of what is Chicago style pizza is pretty much irrelevant because of what the world thinks of as Chicago style pizza. Well, I guess I've been told.

Me and Mike Royko, who wrote a column ripping the idea that a "Chicago-style" pizza was deep-dish rather than thin crust. Home Run Inn is Chicago-style to me (the real thing, from the southwest side, not from your grocer's freezer.)

TornLabrum
08-16-2003, 12:06 AM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
Well, I guess I've been told.

Me and Mike Royko, who wrote a column ripping the idea that a "Chicago-style" pizza was deep-dish rather than thin crust. Home Run Inn is Chicago-style to me (the real thing, from the southwest side, not from your grocer's freezer.)

When I started going to Uno's, the person who introduced it to me called it "deep-dish" or "pan" pizza. I think that's what most Chicagoans who were aware of that variety of pizza probably called it. I didn't hear it called Chicago style pizza until later when I read some publications from out of town extolling it.

As I mentioned before I love Home Run Inn's pizza. (I really miss having WCSF luncheons there.) As for the frozen HRI pizza, it's not the same as the "real" thing, but it's one of the best frozen pizzas out there. Connie's (from the restaurant on Archer) is another favorite.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-16-2003, 07:57 AM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
Me too. Nobody ever heard of a deep-dish pizza in Chicago before Pizzeria Uno. My idea of Chicago style is thin, crisp crust. The crisp is what separated us from the soggy, drippy, New York style pizza...

There was a tiny carryout pizza joint on Western Avenue in Chicago Heights called Romano's, right around the corner from the Show Club strip club. Every Friday during Lent my parents would buy a box of their delicious breaded fried perch and a plain thin crust cheese pizza. We ate this meal on Fridays in February and March throughout my childhood and there was never anything "Chicago-style" or "deep dish" about it. The crust was thin and crusty, just as you described in your post.

It was only several years later that I ever had what is now commonly known as Chicago-style deep dish pizza. Perhaps we can agree there is more than one style worthy of the "Chicago-style" label, both "deep dish" and "thin crusty." However, five million tourists will never be convinced of it. Just ask anybody at the Urinal. :smile:

voodoochile
08-16-2003, 10:13 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
There was a tiny carryout pizza joint on Western Avenue in Chicago Heights called Romano's, right around the corner from the Show Club strip club. Every Friday during Lent my parents would buy a box of their delicious breaded fried perch and a plain thin crust cheese pizza. We ate this meal on Fridays in February and March throughout my childhood and there was never anything "Chicago-style" or "deep dish" about it. The crust was thin and crusty, just as you described in your post.

It was only several years later that I ever had what is now commonly known as Chicago-style deep dish pizza. Perhaps we can agree there is more than one style worthy of the "Chicago-style" label, both "deep dish" and "thin crusty." However, five million tourists will never be convinced of it. Just ask anybody at the Urinal. :smile:

Having worked in restaurants most of my life - my first job was at The Medici in Hyde Park where the specialty of the house is pan/CS pizza - I can say that people have always referred to pan pizza as Chicago Style - at least since I can remember. Even here in Chicago it was thus. In fact, pizza in Italy was traditionally a thin appetizer style pizza, light and not filling.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-20-2003, 05:35 PM
Has anybody here ever eaten at Culver's? Their burgers are really good, and the food quality a couple of notches better than fast food. They have sprouted up all over Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. They're expanding into Illinois and Michigan, too. (A friend of mine opened the franchise in Lansing, MI.) Their ice cream is to die for--a must for any roadside food joint from Wisconsin. :smile:

Culver's burgers taste a bit like Schoops, another great burger indigenous to NW Indiana and SE Cook County. Unlike Schoops, which uses conventional waitress service, you place your Culver's order at the counter like a fast-food joint. However your meal is made to order and brought to your seat by a waiter/waitress. It's called "quick service" and it's the newest rage in the booming foodservice industry. The conventional wisdom in the business says aging Americans will stop eating the junk food that McDonalds and others serve, in favor of higher quality food at slightly higher prices, provided it is served more quickly than the average diner's kitchen can serve it.

You can't miss Culver's if you travel anywhere in Wisconsin. Their blue roofs are everywhere.

Mmm.... butter burgers... <gargle noise>

TornLabrum
08-20-2003, 05:42 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Has anybody here ever eaten at Culver's? Their burgers are really good, and the food quality a couple of notches better than fast food. They have sprouted up all over Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. They're expanding into Illinois and Michigan, too. (A friend of mine opened the franchise in Lansing, MI.) Their ice cream is to die for--a must for any roadside food joint from Wisconsin. :smile:

Culver's burgers taste a bit like Schoops, another great burger indigenous to NW Indiana and SE Cook County. Unlike Schoops, which uses conventional waitress service, you place your Culver's order at the counter like a fast-food joint. However your meal is made to order and brought to your seat by a waiter/waitress. It's called "quick service" and it's the newest rage in the booming foodservice industry. The conventional wisdom in the business says aging Americans will stop eating the junk food that McDonalds and others serve, in favor of higher quality food at slightly higher prices, provided it is served more quickly than the average diner's kitchen can serve it.

There is a Culver's on IL route 59 not far south of Ogden Ave, and another one in Aurora somewhere (Route 31?). When we have evening events at school in Poplar Grove where I have to stay late into the evening, I'll either stop at the one in Belvidere or stop on the way home in Sycamore on Rt. 23.

If you like port tenderloin's give theirs a try. Most of them you get nowadays are processed meat...you know the stuff that looks like granuels. Culver's are actually made of slices of pork. you can see the grain in the meat. There used to be a really good restaurant where my dad would take us as a kid. Their best sandwich was their pork tenderloin. This tastes as good or better than what I remember as a kid.

MarqSox
08-20-2003, 08:40 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Has anybody here ever eaten at Culver's? Their burgers are really good, and the food quality a couple of notches better than fast food. They have sprouted up all over Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. They're expanding into Illinois and Michigan, too. (A friend of mine opened the franchise in Lansing, MI.) Their ice cream is to die for--a must for any roadside food joint from Wisconsin. :smile:


Dude Culver's is the shiznit. Easily my favorite fast food joint this side of Portillos. However, they serve custard, not ice cream! :D:

hsnterprize
08-24-2003, 11:20 AM
Okay...we've wetted our baseball and culinary appetites pretty good on this thread. Here's something to ponder...when you're heading up 94 to Wisconsin for whatever reason, let me recomment the Brat Stop just a few minutes north of the border. I forgot exactly what exit the place is on, and I haven't been there in a while. However, I do know there's this huge "CHEESE" sign you can see from the interstate, and the place is near some shops and a large car dealer. The Brat Stop is a pretty neat place to eat...I would go there often with some friends of mine whenever we'd go to Milwaukee to see the Brewers. We went there to see a game the final year County Stadium was up. It was fun. Nothing like hearing a bunch of folks sing "Roll Out The Barrel" during the 7th inning stretch to get you up for a game...at least it isn't some celebrity who can't sing trying to cheer th efans up at Wrigley.

voodoochile
08-24-2003, 11:37 AM
I think it was mentioned in this thread earlier during the pan pizza/Chicago-style discussion, but I had Lou Malnatti's pizza the other night. Was at a friends house and we ordered a pan pizza for the adults (Sausage, Mushroom and spinich) and a thin pizza for the kids (1/2 GP, 1/2 pepp).

Without a doubt the pan pizza was the best I've had in a long time - maybe ever. The thin was also excellent. I love those ultra thin crispy crusts.

Stunning stuff. I have a new favorite...

davenicholson
08-24-2003, 12:09 PM
Originally posted by hsnterprize
Okay...we've wetted our baseball and culinary appetites pretty good on this thread. Here's something to ponder...when you're heading up 94 to Wisconsin for whatever reason, let me recomment the Brat Stop just a few minutes north of the border. I forgot exactly what exit the place is on, and I haven't been there in a while. However, I do know there's this huge "CHEESE" sign you can see from the interstate, and the place is near some shops and a large car dealer. The Brat Stop is a pretty neat place to eat...I would go there often with some friends of mine whenever we'd go to Milwaukee to see the Brewers. We went there to see a game the final year County Stadium was up. It was fun. Nothing like hearing a bunch of folks sing "Roll Out The Barrel" during the 7th inning stretch to get you up for a game...at least it isn't some celebrity who can't sing trying to cheer th efans up at Wrigley.
Good place. But also, ya GOTTA make a stop at Mars Cheese Castle. I know it's cliche, but they make the best Reubin in the known universe. There is so much cheese and corned beef on it that you can hear your arteries slam shut over the loud chewing sounds you're sure to make! :D: Hand over your car keys to the wife (she can cruise the gift shop) and wash it all down with a coupla Sprecher Hefe Weiss, :gulp: and you are as close to heaven as you can be north of the state line! Plus, even with my Illinois plates, I've never been called FIB, FIP nor FISH there!

davenicholson
08-24-2003, 12:11 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I think it was mentioned in this thread earlier during the pan pizza/Chicago-style discussion, but I had Lou Malnatti's pizza the other night. Was at a friends house and we ordered a pan pizza for the adults (Sausage, Mushroom and spinich) and a thin pizza for the kids (1/2 GP, 1/2 pepp).

Without a doubt the pan pizza was the best I've had in a long time - maybe ever. The thin was also excellent. I love those ultra thin crispy crusts.

Stunning stuff. I have a new favorite...
Oh yeah, Malnotti's pan is definitely The Good Stuff! :smile: . I'm a recent convert to thin crust pizza, ever since we moved to a 90 second walk from Traverso's in Naperville. I love a thin, crispy crust, but I can't stand that soggy carboard-like crust they call "pie" in New Yawk :angry: .

livewir
08-24-2003, 01:26 PM
Well im bored at work right now so ill throw in my 2 cents.

Hot dogs should have no Ketchup period.

per a channel 11 special on chicago food chicago style pizza is thing crust , crispy, cut in squares not pie slices

the uno's in the burbs and other parts of the country dont even come close to the original. Girodano's in the burbs is better than uno's in the burbs.

Paul's Pizza in westchester, wolf and 31st i think(by the grocery store) . has the best beef ever . Beef + Mozzerella on Garlic bread. soooooo gooood. you could eat a whole box of mints and you can still smell the garlic your breath (much to my co-workers disgust)

Aurelios lunch buffett is awesome the sauce is sweet but good.

Ranch is the new Ketchup

I know its bad but I love hooters wings . there so good. you can order them without breading for you purists.

And Suzie Q's are my favorite hostess treat.

I think I got it all.

now for my own little story.

Couple weeks ago I was hanging around my Fiance's parents house complaing that I wasnt at the sox game and that I had a craving for Best's Kosher dogs like at the cell. My fiance's mom pulls out a package of them from the fridge saying "oh is that what these are, you want one?" i love those hot dogs.

Paulwny
08-27-2003, 09:47 AM
If anyone is going to be my area this weekend stop in and bring Rolaids.

http://www.buffalowing.com/restaurants.html

davenicholson
08-27-2003, 09:55 AM
Originally posted by Paulwny
If anyone is going to be my area this weekend stop in and bring Rolaids.

http://www.buffalowing.com/restaurants.html
Paul,

You sure have made me jealous with that link! We finally got a decent place for wings here in the western suburbs of Chicago (the BW3 chain), but nothing like I see listed on your link. Two comments:
[list=1]
My favorite name of the restaurants listed: Pluck You :smile:
A entry from a place called The Lobster Hut for God's sake??
[/list=1]
Have a great time and don't forget: :gulp:

Paulwny
08-27-2003, 10:05 AM
My sox daughter and cub loving son-in-law live in Naperville. He also mentioned that BW3 has good wings. I'll find out in Oct. when we visit and the 3 of us (me, wife, daughter) are cheering the sox on in the ws and my son-in-law is cursing under his breath.

davenicholson
08-27-2003, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by Paulwny
My sox daughter and cub loving son-in-law live in Naperville. He also mentioned that BW3 has good wings. I'll find out in Oct. when we visit and the 3 of us (me, wife, daughter) are cheering the sox on in the ws and my son-in-law is cursing under his breath.
Paul,

Welcome to the western suburbs! I live about 2 miles from the Naperville BW3, but I gotta tell ya, coming from Buffalo, don't get your hopes up too high on the wings. My experience is that the they're pretty scrawny, but that the wide choice of sauces is great. I always go for a half dozen of the "Flaming" (or whatever the name of their hottest is) and a half dozen of Cajun or Thai, to cool things down. A coupla Hefe Weizens also help. I haven't been to this particular franchisee yet, but the few I have been to have sported several large screen TVs, and are great places to catch the game. Have fun!

jabrch
08-27-2003, 11:40 AM
OK, we might have done this already...but...

I always have liked Carsons...Good quality meat, very good flavor...falls off the bone. My boss is coming in from NYC and someone told her to try Twin Anchors. I always hear about Twin Anchors, but have never been there....

Can I get a Twin Anchors Ribs report?

Thanks

Jason

booter14
08-27-2003, 12:23 PM
Ribs

Twin Anchors has the best ribs in the city. Carson's ribs are and have been over rated forever.

the ribs @ Twin Anchors, the meat falls of the bone and melts in your mouth. Its also a cool setting on the northside in the middle of neighborhood @ Sedgewick & Eugenie, just north of North ave.

Also check out: Woody's @ Lincoln & Damen area, and the Hickory on the southside.

maurice
08-27-2003, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by booter14
the Hickory on the southside.

If this is a reference to the Hickory Pit, please note that the restaurant is closed and the building has been demolished.