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TheGipper
07-15-2003, 03:17 PM
Growing up a Whitesox fan I loved Greg Walker and like having him on the team. He was better than a lot of first baseman and but was always one position I always felt the the Sox could upgrade. Granted, he had great power from the left side but didn't really hit for average that I can recall and struck out quite a bit.

I loved him as a player, but kind of questioned why the Sox chose him as a hitting coach. Baines I could see, but Walker? Is there any connection to the bats going cold since he came on board. Any thoughts.

Brian26
07-15-2003, 03:26 PM
Since Walker came on board, the Sox bats have actually come to life. This last road trip was, hopefully, an anamoly.

To be very frank, Harold Baines doesn't have what it takes to be a hitting coach. He's not personable enough, and I don't think he's enough of a student of the game. Anyone who saw him at Soxfest knows what I'm talking about. I don't think he has the verbal skill to pass his knowledge along to the team. Nothing against him...I'm sure he's a good guy.

maurice
07-15-2003, 03:29 PM
There's no correlation between a person's ability to hit major league pitching well and his ability to teach others to hit major league pitching well. For example, Charlie Lau was a career .255 hitter, and Walt Hriniak was a .253 hitter.

IMHO, Harold is a good student of the game but doesn't appear to enjoy interacting with others.

RKMeibalane
07-15-2003, 03:55 PM
Originally posted by maurice
For example, Charlie Lau was a career .255 hitter, and Walt Hriniak was a .253 hitter.

Just out of curiosity, did Hriniak hit using the same style that he teaches to other players?

Nellie_Fox
07-15-2003, 03:59 PM
I remember when Walker came to the Sox as a rookie, the "expert" consensus was that it was a matter of when, not if, he won a batting title. His swing was so beautiful it was used as an instructional video in the rookie league.

I don't pretend to know why that never actually came to pass. But, as has been said above, the best coaches are usually guys who had mediocre careers, maybe because they had to work the hardest and study the game the most just to hang on.

RKMeibalane
07-15-2003, 04:06 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
I remember when Walker came to the Sox as a rookie, the "expert" consensus was that it was a matter of when, not if, he won a batting title. His swing was so beautiful it was used as an instructional video in the rookie league.

I don't pretend to know why that never actually came to pass. But, as has been said above, the best coaches are usually guys who had mediocre careers, maybe because they had to work the hardest and study the game the most just to hang on.

I agree. The same can often be said for managers. Many of the best managers in baseball today were, at best, average players. A few had strong careers, but most were on par with the Aaron Rowand's and Tony Graffanino's of the world as far as their playing ability went. Because they weren't blessed with extraordinary skill, they had to develop a sophisticated understanding of how baseball is played, in order to rise to the level of their opponents.

Of course, if a sophisticated understanding of baseball is what is required for someone to be a coach or manager, then why in the world is Jerry Manuel around?

:reinsy

"He's cheap. That's why."