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Lip Man 1
07-04-2003, 10:03 PM
Former Sox announcer (and Cubs) Vince Lloyd died today in Arizona. He was 86.

Lloyd was one of the Sox radio and TV announcers during the 50's and 60's. For the most part he teamed up with Jack Brickhouse on WGN-TV.

They say he was a real gentleman. I had the chance to met him one time and agree with that assesment.

Over Christmas break 1975 I was back in Chicago and had made arrangements to talk with some of the local broadcasters for an upper level paper I was working on for a class at UK. The paper (which I still have) was called "The role of the sports broadcaster."

I was able to speak with Harry Caray, Johnny Morris, Chet Coppock and Vince.

I met him at the WGN studios on Bradley Place and only wanted about twnety minutes of his time. Vince wound up sitting there with me for two hours!

He told me all kind of stories including the days when he broadcast Kentucky games when Adolph Rupp was coaching.

Two things he told me have stayed with me to this day. The first was when I asked him about the trend of hiring people who "know" people in the business as opposed to everyone else who didn't. Vince said, "certainly knowing someone will get you a job but if you don't have the ability to do the job, you won't keep it..."

The other thing I remember was the time he told me he had a discussion with then Cubs owner P.K. Wrigley about the team and why it wasn't winning. Vince said Mr. Wrigley told him, "we aren't interested in winning...we're interested in entertaining ."

Obviously the Cubs have continued with that philosophy.

Vince Lloyd...class man...good broadcaster.

Lip

TornLabrum
07-04-2003, 11:07 PM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
Former Sox announcer (and Cubs) Vince Lloyd died today in Arizona. He was 86.

Lloyd was one of the Sox radio and TV announcers during the 50's and 60's. For the most part he teamed up with Jack Brickhouse on WGN-TV.

They say he was a real gentleman. I had the chance to met him one time and agree with that assesment.

Over Christmas break 1975 I was back in Chicago and had made arrangements to talk with some of the local broadcasters for an upper level paper I was working on for a class at UK. The paper (which I still have) was called "The role of the sports broadcaster."

I was able to speak with Harry Caray, Johnny Morris, Chet Coppock and Vince.

I met him at the WGN studios on Bradley Place and only wanted about twnety minutes of his time. Vince wound up sitting there with me for two hours!

He told me all kind of stories including the days when he broadcast Kentucky games when Adolph Rupp was coaching.

Two things he told me have stayed with me to this day. The first was when I asked him about the trend of hiring people who "know" people in the business as opposed to everyone else who didn't. Vince said, "certainly knowing someone will get you a job but if you don't have the ability to do the job, you won't keep it..."

The other thing I remember was the time he told me he had a discussion with then Cubs owner P.K. Wrigley about the team and why it wasn't winning. Vince said Mr. Wrigley told him, "we aren't interested in winning...we're interested in entertaining ."

Obviously the Cubs have continued with that philosophy.

Vince Lloyd...class man...good broadcaster.

Lip

I agree wholeheartedly, Lip. For those who are too young to remember the WGN-Channel 9 broadcasts of the Sox and Cubs back in the '50s and '60s, Lloyd's job was to do the "Lead-Off Man" pre-game interview and then do an inning and a half of play-by-play from the bottom of the 7th through the 8th inning.

You should have asked Lloyd about the man he replaced, Harry Creighton. Harry left the Ch. 9 broadcasts the year I became a baseball fan, reportedly because he was too fond of imbibing the product of one of the sponsors (and it wasn't Oklahoma gasoline) while on the air.

As many of you know, at one point my second team was the Cubs. Vince and Lou Boudreau, whom we also lost not long ago, were a great broadcasting team. It's sad to see so many links to my childhood passing on these days.

Rest in peace, Vince.