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B. Diddy
07-03-2003, 03:49 PM
This is from today's Sun-Times. I'm sure that a lot of people have already heard this (it was in a recent issue of ESPN the Magazine), but I thought I'd post it for those who haven't. I don't want to start a "creationism vs. Darwinism" debate, but you kind of have to wonder what's going on in this guy's head...

Not for the man [Everett] who is on record as questioning whether astronauts actually walked on the moon and said:

"God created the sun, the stars, the heavens and the earth, and then made Adam and Eve. The Bible never says anything about dinosaurs. You can't say there were dinosaurs when you never saw them. Someone actually saw Adam and Eve. No one ever saw a Tyrannosaurus rex.''

As for dinosaur bones?

"Made by man.''

Dadawg_77
07-03-2003, 03:50 PM
Originally posted by B. Diddy
This is from today's Sun-Times. I'm sure that a lot of people have already heard this (it was in a recent issue of ESPN the Magazine), but I thought I'd post it for those who haven't. I don't want to start a "creationism vs. Darwinism" debate, but you kind of have to wonder what's going on in this guy's head...

Not for the man [Everett] who is on record as questioning whether astronauts actually walked on the moon and said:

"God created the sun, the stars, the heavens and the earth, and then made Adam and Eve. The Bible never says anything about dinosaurs. You can't say there were dinosaurs when you never saw them. Someone actually saw Adam and Eve. No one ever saw a Tyrannosaurus rex.''

As for dinosaur bones?

"Made by man.''

While his belief system seems strange and incorrect as long as he hits and catches the ball for the Sox I will root for him.

Iguana775
07-03-2003, 03:50 PM
*****!!! he actaully believes this?

Randar68
07-03-2003, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by Iguana775
*****!!! he actaully believes this?

Scary enough, yes. I always used to give my old college roommate crap about this because his mom believed it. He took it good nature because he thought she was whacked outta her gourd too.

It's the literal translation of the Bible. BTW, I want to know who was there to see Adam and Eve and record that history, since, after-all, they were the first humans.

kevingrt
07-03-2003, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by B. Diddy
This is from today's Sun-Times. I'm sure that a lot of people have already heard this (it was in a recent issue of ESPN the Magazine), but I thought I'd post it for those who haven't. I don't want to start a "creationism vs. Darwinism" debate, but you kind of have to wonder what's going on in this guy's head...

Not for the man [Everett] who is on record as questioning whether astronauts actually walked on the moon and said:

"God created the sun, the stars, the heavens and the earth, and then made Adam and Eve. The Bible never says anything about dinosaurs. You can't say there were dinosaurs when you never saw them. Someone actually saw Adam and Eve. No one ever saw a Tyrannosaurus rex.''

As for dinosaur bones?

"Made by man.''

Classic quote! :D:

voodoochile
07-03-2003, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by Iguana775
*****!!! he actaully believes this?

Yep, I've heard this from him before. Old news. Hey, as long as he hits another 20 HR this year and plays a solid CF, I don't care if he believes the moon is made of green cheese and the stars are holes in a barrier that let God's light shine through.

ilsox7
07-03-2003, 04:11 PM
While I don't necessarily agree with his beliefs, there are actually a lot of people who believe the astronauts never reached the moon and the other things he said. He definitely isn't alone in those beliefs.

fquaye149
07-03-2003, 04:13 PM
i agree with what has been said but

LOL at the thread title

FarWestChicago
07-03-2003, 09:01 PM
I used to work with an engineer who did not believe in evolution. He was a great guy and a damn good engineer. While we didn't see eye to eye on many things, I valued his character and his skills. There was no need to judge him.

doublem23
07-03-2003, 09:02 PM
I think that pretty much sums it up... As long as Carl's beleifs don't get in the way of hitting the ball (a la Jobu in Major League), I don't care what he really thinks.

vegyrex
07-03-2003, 09:54 PM
Pat Robertson must be a HUGE Carl Everett fan :D:

TornLabrum
07-03-2003, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by Randar68
Scary enough, yes. I always used to give my old college roommate crap about this because his mom believed it. He took it good nature because he thought she was whacked outta her gourd too.

It's the literal translation of the Bible. BTW, I want to know who was there to see Adam and Eve and record that history, since, after-all, they were the first humans.

I still want to know who Cain married.

fquaye149
07-04-2003, 03:12 AM
Originally posted by vegyrex
Pat Robertson must be a HUGE Carl Everett fan :D:

no, carl everett's black

B. Diddy
07-04-2003, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by FarWestChicago
I used to work with an engineer who did not believe in evolution. He was a great guy and a damn good engineer. While we didn't see eye to eye on many things, I valued his character and his skills. There was no need to judge him.

Being a creationist and not believing that men actually walked on the moon are two completely different things.

I have nothing against Carl, but I believe that his comments show how important education is.

WhiteSox = Life
07-04-2003, 03:06 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
I still want to know who Cain married.

Not to mention, just what the hell happened on Noah's Ark.

voodoochile
07-04-2003, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by WhiteSox = Life
Not to mention, just what the hell happened on Noah's Ark.

That's easy...

One spring, the Nile flooded and this Jewish dude named Noah built a large raft and put his family and animals on it saving them from drowning. Meanwhile his neighbors lost everything. Pretty soon the story got around and the "grapevine" effect created this incredible legend. Several centuries later, someone wrote down the legend.

Procol Harum
07-04-2003, 03:33 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
That's easy...

One spring, the Nile flooded and this Jewish dude named Noah built a large raft and put his family and animals on it saving them from drowning. Meanwhile his neighbors lost everything. Pretty soon the story got around and the "grapevine" effect created this incredible legend. Several centuries later, someone wrote down the legend.

Sheeeesh, Voo. Most skeptics at least try to credit the Jews with copying the Babylonian flood story of Gilgamesh. And by the by, the Genesis story makes it pretty clear that Noah wasn't "Jewish." The biblical account notes that the first "official" Jew would have been Isaac, who comes much later in the story in Genesis. On that flood thing, don't discount the matter that almost every culture on the planet has an ancient story about a disastrous flood that just about wiped everything out. Perhaps they have some idea of what they're talking about--folks back yonder may not have had microwaves or the :bandance: but they weren't stupid.

voodoochile
07-04-2003, 03:40 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Sheeeesh, Voo. Most skeptics at least try to credit the Jews with copying the Babylonian flood story of Gilgamesh. And by the by, the Genesis story makes it pretty clear that Noah wasn't "Jewish." The biblical account notes that the first "official" Jew would have been Isaac, who comes much later in the story in Genesis. On that flood thing, don't discount the matter that almost every culture on the planet has an ancient story about a disastrous flood that just about wiped everything out. Perhaps they have some idea of what they're talking about--folks back yonder may not have microwaves or the :bandance: but they weren't stupid.

Actually, I admit. I was guessing. I had no idea where the story comes from. Yours is much more plausible and you are correct about flood stories being common place in many religions. Humankind has always waged a war of survival with the elements and every culture has experienced catastrophys.

Wherever the story comes from, I have no problem with it being a written history of an event. My point was that there is a VERY small chance this flood actually was caused by God or that Noah was actually talking to God before the flood or that it said flood actually did destroy every living thing on the planet except for Noah and his charges. That's the part that makes it a legend. Not the human building a big boat and rescuing his family and animals from a really bad situation.

Sorry for getting the details wrong. Thanks for filling me in...

:bandance:

Procol Harum
07-04-2003, 03:45 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
My point was that there is a VERY small chance this flood actually was caused by God or that Noah was actually talking to God before the flood or that it said flood actually did destroy every living thing on the planet except for Noah and his charges. That's the part that makes it a legend. Not the human building a big boat and rescuing his family and animals from a really bad situation.

Sorry for getting the details wrong. Thanks for filling me in...

:bandance:

Reckon that depends on whether or not there's a God or not, whether He intervenes in human affairs, etc. Hard to "prove" that one way or t'other to the satisfaction of folks on either side of the divide. My hunch is, it won't even be settled on WSI :o:
Whatever the case, we can be sure that if ol' Noah was takin' in things by twosies then certainly Mr & Mrs. :bandance: were there!

WhiteSox = Life
07-04-2003, 03:46 PM
As long as Victor E. or DB or Rally, or whatever the name may be, as long as he is seen dancin' then all is forgiven.

:D:

voodoochile
07-04-2003, 03:57 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Reckon that depends on whether or not there's a God or not, whether He intervenes in human affairs, etc. Hard to "prove" that one way or t'other to the satisfaction of folks on either side of the divide. My hunch is, it won't even be settled on WSI :o:
Whatever the case, we can be sure that if ol' Noah was takin' in things by twosies then certainly Mr & Mrs. :bandance: were there!

I agree. It won't be settled here. My point is that even if those things are possible, what are the odds they were happening right at that moment in time? But in either case, we agree on one thing. :bandance: That little guy is cool...

TornLabrum
07-04-2003, 04:15 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Sheeeesh, Voo. Most skeptics at least try to credit the Jews with copying the Babylonian flood story of Gilgamesh. And by the by, the Genesis story makes it pretty clear that Noah wasn't "Jewish." The biblical account notes that the first "official" Jew would have been Isaac, who comes much later in the story in Genesis. On that flood thing, don't discount the matter that almost every culture on the planet has an ancient story about a disastrous flood that just about wiped everything out. Perhaps they have some idea of what they're talking about--folks back yonder may not have had microwaves or the :bandance: but they weren't stupid.

Since people tend to live around bodies of fresh water, which often flood when there is a lot of rain, it's stands to reason that most cultures have a flood story.

TornLabrum
07-04-2003, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Actually, I admit. I was guessing. I had no idea where the story comes from. Yours is much more plausible and you are correct about flood stories being common place in many religions. Humankind has always waged a war of survival with the elements and every culture has experienced catastrophys.

Wherever the story comes from, I have no problem with it being a written history of an event. My point was that there is a VERY small chance this flood actually was caused by God or that Noah was actually talking to God before the flood or that it said flood actually did destroy every living thing on the planet except for Noah and his charges. That's the part that makes it a legend. Not the human building a big boat and rescuing his family and animals from a really bad situation.

Sorry for getting the details wrong. Thanks for filling me in...

:bandance:

Recently discovered evidence indicates that there may have been a flood in the near east that resulted from the Black Sea overflowing its banks for some reason that I don't recall. A similar thing happened to some dammed up water in what is now the western United States, where the natural dam burst, flooding much of what is now the Columbia River basin, iirc.

Bisco Stu
07-04-2003, 07:26 PM
The byebull is a book of myths and hopefully CE will keep his mouth shut and just play ball.

I also hope he doesn't win the ALCS or WS MVP because I don't want to hear him praise his lord and personal savior.

Jesus is a Sox fan?

Actually, since he's a symbol of pain and defeat that makes sense.

Procol Harum
07-05-2003, 08:40 AM
Originally posted by Bisco Stu

Jesus is a Sox fan?

Actually, since he's a symbol of pain and defeat that makes sense.

Hmmmm, I always thought that for Christians that the resurrection thing was kinda the symbol of the ultimate bottom of the 9th come-from-behind victory. Whaddya know. Thanks for clearing that all up for us.

TornLabrum
07-05-2003, 10:25 AM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Hmmmm, I always thought that for Christians that the resurrection thing was kinda the symbol of the ultimate bottom of the 9th come-from-behind victory. Whaddya know. Thanks for clearing that all up for us.

I think that shows the difference between Sox fans and Cubs fans.

Think of it as a version of the movie "Ground Hog Day," except retitled "Good Friday." Both fans keep waking up and living through the horror. The difference is, Cubs fans keep thinking they'll eventually wake up on Easter Sunday. Sox fans know it's going to go on forever and that there is no redemption.

Procol Harum
07-05-2003, 11:44 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
I think that shows the difference between Sox fans and Cubs fans.

Think of it as a version of the movie "Ground Hog Day," except retitled "Good Friday." Both fans keep waking up and living through the horror. The difference is, Cubs fans keep thinking they'll eventually wake up on Easter Sunday. Sox fans know it's going to go on forever and that there is no redemption.

Interesting. But I think a better read would have Cubs fans go through Good Friday leaving the crucifixion scene oblivious to what's just happened and looking for a nice yuppie bar somewhere in the Golgotha neighborhood. Once there, they say yip-yip-hooray to their long-time favorite disciple Judas Iscariot when he says he's sorry, wishes things might have turned out differently, and that he's appealing his conviction. Sox fans endure Good Friday in the belief that eventually their suffering will one day turn to rejoicing. In the meantime, the pre-Easter world stinks.

voodoochile
07-05-2003, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Interesting. But I think a better read would have Cubs fans go through Good Friday leaving the crucifixion scene oblivious to what's just happened and looking for a nice yuppie bar somewhere in the Golgotha neighborhood. Once there, they say yip-yip-hooray to their long-time favorite disciple Judas Iscariot when he says he's sorry, wishes things might have turned out differently, and that he's appealing his conviction. Sox fans endure Good Friday in the belief that eventually their suffering will one day turn to rejoicing. In the meantime, the pre-Easter world stinks.

*****! Well done, Procol...

TornLabrum
07-05-2003, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Interesting. But I think a better read would have Cubs fans go through Good Friday leaving the crucifixion scene oblivious to what's just happened and looking for a nice yuppie bar somewhere in the Golgotha neighborhood. Once there, they say yip-yip-hooray to their long-time favorite disciple Judas Iscariot when he says he's sorry, wishes things might have turned out differently, and that he's appealing his conviction. Sox fans endure Good Friday in the belief that eventually their suffering will one day turn to rejoicing. In the meantime, the pre-Easter world stinks.

Maybe the younger Sox fans among us, but the Old Fart contingent sees no end coming at all.

Bisco Stu
07-05-2003, 07:37 PM
How is a man dying on a cross a symbol of resurrection? A symbol of resurrection would depict someone afloat towards the heavens or rising from the tomb, etc.

Careful, you're treading into CE territory here...

Procol Harum
07-06-2003, 09:20 AM
Originally posted by Bisco Stu
How is a man dying on a cross a symbol of resurrection? A symbol of resurrection would depict someone afloat towards the heavens or rising from the tomb, etc.

Careful, you're treading into CE territory here...

Well, as I recall, the Christian belief is that the cross was not the end of the story--there was that resurrection thing that Christians believe in. Your statement declared Jesus to be a symbol of pain and defeat--hardly true when the resurrection is factored in. You obviously don't believe in that, and that's your prerogative. However, as you framed the discussion as one about symbolic power, then it would be appropriate to take the symbol at it's face value--in effect what you're doing would be to say that the phoenix rising up from the ashes is not a symbol of rebirth and regeneration but a mere toasty dragon.

maurice
07-07-2003, 12:58 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Once there, they say yip-yip-hooray to their long-time favorite disciple Judas Iscariot when he says he's sorry, wishes things might have turned out differently, and that he's appealing his conviction.

So you're saying that we can look forward to Corky hanging himself (perhaps out of disappointment for missing the All-Star team)?

Iwritecode
07-07-2003, 01:46 PM
Originally posted by Procol Harum
Hmmmm, I always thought that for Christians that the resurrection thing was kinda the symbol of the ultimate bottom of the 9th come-from-behind victory. Whaddya know. Thanks for clearing that all up for us.

"Ahh, Jesus. I like him very much. But he no help me with curve ball."

:D:

raul12
07-07-2003, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by Bisco Stu
The byebull is a book of myths and hopefully CE will keep his mouth shut and just play ball.

I also hope he doesn't win the ALCS or WS MVP because I don't want to hear him praise his lord and personal savior.


This probably should get taken to the parking lot, but I think it's rather ignorant to make an off-handed statement like that. While I can take a good joke re: Christianity (Monty Python movies are some of my favorites) to totally reject the point of the Bible due to some inconsistencies based on misinterpreting the Bible, is a bit premature/neanderthal.

By the way, I don't believe in a worldwide flood, I believe man landed on the moon, I believe in evolution, but I'm still a Christian. So please don't lump the Carl Everette's, Jerry Falwell's, George Bush's of the world in with the rest of us. If I said that just b/c you're from SF that you're a (insert), I assume you'd be rather offended (even if you were, not that there's anything wrong with that). It's the same mentality that you are taking in your attitude towards Christians.

Part of my work is designing for extreme floods, and there's a design parameter called "probable maximum flood". Over a 40-day period, the largest event on record is something like several hundred inches of rain. Even if the "Noah flood" exceeded this by several times, it still would've only been ~100 feet of rain. Average that out over the entire world, and you would still have molehills out of the water. In order to flood an area out, the event would have to be more localized, with civilization living near a body of water (as others here have alluded to). This would result in "all" mankind being wiped out.

raul12
07-07-2003, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by Iwritecode
"Ahh, Jesus. I like him very much. But he no help me with curve ball."

:D:

Would it be a copyright violation if we could get a jpg of that scene? Also the one where the old pitcher gets cracked over the head with the bat after saying, "up your butt jobu".