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View Full Version : What's Wrong With Borchard?


joecrede
04-21-2003, 10:59 AM
I see where Borchard hasn't played in about a week. Anyone hear the reason?

NC_sox_fan
04-21-2003, 11:19 AM
I believe Joe has tendinitis in his wrist. Nothing too serious, hopefully.

Iguana775
04-21-2003, 01:33 PM
Originally posted by NC_sox_fan
I believe Joe has tendinitis in his wrist. Nothing too serious, hopefully.

The wrist, huh??? Interesting.....

man, I hope he is ready soon. CF is really lacking right now.

white sox bill
04-22-2003, 06:57 AM
Lets hope the Sox don't let this kid get buried for too long a time in the minors like the other Joe (Crede). We could have used Crede for ALL of last yr, and maybe even in 2001

MHOUSE
04-22-2003, 08:55 AM
Originally posted by NC_sox_fan
I believe Joe has tendinitis in his wrist. Nothing too serious, hopefully.

The Sox should pay to get him a hooker or something. :D:

TheBigHurt
04-22-2003, 09:19 AM
Originally posted by MHOUSE
The Sox should pay to get him a hooker or something. :D:

HE can borrow some i know here in NYC....JUST make sure he returns them

fuzzy_patters
04-22-2003, 11:28 AM
Originally posted by white sox bill
Lets hope the Sox don't let this kid get buried for too long a time in the minors like the other Joe (Crede). We could have used Crede for ALL of last yr, and maybe even in 2001

The Sox have said that Crede used to have a hole in his swing. Judging by how well he has hit since the called him up last year, I would say the Sox got this one right. Joe has a really nice swing right now, and it's much better than the slight upper cut he had the first time he was called up.

Anyway, this is a pet peeve of mine. Baseball has expanded to the point that young players are being rushed. It used to be routine that guys didn't come up until they were 25 or 26, with exceptions such as Al Kaline. Guys that age are now considered to be older prospects. Why not wait to call guys up until they are actually ready to succeed with consistency? Why ride a roller coaster while a young player develops? Couldn't that roller coaster actually impede his development by creating bad habits and a lack of confidence?

mack10zie
04-22-2003, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by fuzzy_patters
The Sox have said that Crede used to have a hole in his swing. Judging by how well he has hit since the called him up last year, I would say the Sox got this one right. Joe has a really nice swing right now, and it's much better than the slight upper cut he had the first time he was called up.

Anyway, this is a pet peeve of mine. Baseball has expanded to the point that young players are being rushed. It used to be routine that guys didn't come up until they were 25 or 26, with exceptions such as Al Kaline. Guys that age are now considered to be older prospects. Why not wait to call guys up until they are actually ready to succeed with consistency? Why ride a roller coaster while a young player develops? Couldn't that roller coaster actually impede his development by creating bad habits and a lack of confidence?

I see where you're coming from but the fact is that with expansion this is going to happen, there are more positions to be filled, and no real unflux in talent from anywhere. You could argue that there are more and more foreigners in the league, creating more and more talented players, but I think a lot of the top athletes in the US are more inclined to pursue basketall or football instead of baseball (with Drew Henson as an obvious counter-example). The US athletic talent pool has diminished with the popularization of basketball and football, so I think in the end the talent pool is probably comparable to what it was around the mid-1900's. So it forces clubs to play the young players at the major league level earlier than ever before. This is just the feeling that I get, and is by no means necessarily accurate, and I have no stats to back it up, just based on my observations.

Another thing that has effected this was the VERY early success of players like Ken Griffey, A-Rod, and a handful of other outstanding players who excelled at a very young age. When teams see these guys do what they do they look at their organization and figure, "Hey, why can't <insert highly touted prospect here> do what A-Rod did. What he lacks now he'll be able to learn even quicker in the big leagues." I think this is the mentality and also contributes to this trend.

JustJim35
04-22-2003, 01:00 PM
Originally posted by mack10zie
I see where you're coming from but the fact is that with expansion this is going to happen, there are more positions to be filled, and no real unflux in talent from anywhere. You could argue that there are more and more foreigners in the league, creating more and more talented players, but I think a lot of the top athletes in the US are more inclined to pursue basketall or football instead of baseball (with Drew Henson as an obvious counter-example). The US athletic talent pool has diminished with the popularization of basketball and football, so I think in the end the talent pool is probably comparable to what it was around the mid-1900's. So it forces clubs to play the young players at the major league level earlier than ever before. This is just the feeling that I get, and is by no means necessarily accurate, and I have no stats to back it up, just based on my observations.

Another thing that has effected this was the VERY early success of players like Ken Griffey, A-Rod, and a handful of other outstanding players who excelled at a very young age. When teams see these guys do what they do they look at their organization and figure, "Hey, why can't <insert highly touted prospect here> do what A-Rod did. What he lacks now he'll be able to learn even quicker in the big leagues." I think this is the mentality and also contributes to this trend.

Don't discount the money factor either. Big bonuses mean less time to wait until the player develops. ROI becomes an issue. In addition, the players themselves want to get to the majors as fast as possible. If a guy doesn't come up until he is 25, then by the time he is eligible for the big money, he is already on the downside of his career. So they make more noise and the agents hype the players to the press in an attempt to get the kid up ASAP.

foulkesfan11
04-22-2003, 01:10 PM
With the way Rowand is batting, I wish Borchard would get called up! And Soon! I know Rowand is better defensively, but we need some more offense!

Rocklive99
04-22-2003, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by foulkesfan11
With the way Rowand is batting, I wish Borchard would get called up! And Soon! I know Rowand is better defensively, but we need some more offense!

Borchard has a nice arm though

MHOUSE
04-22-2003, 03:23 PM
Rowand hardly batted/played all spring with his shoulder. He'll come around I think. Everyone has complained that they took too long to get Crede up, but he's playing now like an everyday MLB 3B and we don't have to put up with a learning curve. Look at Rauch who was rushed in and now we have to wait for him to retool. Garland too has been up for 3 years very early and he's not improved. Have patience with Borchard so when he comes up he's more the finished product.

kermittheefrog
04-22-2003, 11:50 PM
Originally posted by fuzzy_patters

Anyway, this is a pet peeve of mine. Baseball has expanded to the point that young players are being rushed. It used to be routine that guys didn't come up until they were 25 or 26, with exceptions such as Al Kaline. Guys that age are now considered to be older prospects. Why not wait to call guys up until they are actually ready to succeed with consistency? Why ride a roller coaster while a young player develops? Couldn't that roller coaster actually impede his development by creating bad habits and a lack of confidence?

Actually it's completely the opposite. Players are reaching the majors older than ever before. I've seen studies that take the average age of players making their major league debut and the 90's have the highest average age. There were less players coming from college and players spending less time in the minors before the 90's.