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View Full Version : When did you become a White Sox fan?


hsnterprize
03-03-2003, 07:29 AM
Hey Sox Fans!!!!! I thought I'd post this to jog the memories of great baseball fans who frequent this site. It's a simple question...when did you become a Sox fan? Was it when you were a kid, or did you decide to follow the Sox when you were older? Were you a Cub fan before your "conversion"? Talk about your love for "Da Sout' Siders".

As for me, I've been a Sox fan for quite some time, but it wasn't until after I left the Army in 1993 when I solidified my loyalty to the Sox. I remember when I was in high school back in the late 80's when I really started following the Sox. Back then, I was living in Broadview (a suburb about 6 miles west of Chicago and 12 miles west of the Loop), and people who I attended school with were following the Cubs. There were so many Cub fans that I just decided to "go against the flow", and go with the other team. Now...I've watched many a Sox game on TV, and I've ridden past Comiskey Park several times while visiting with relatives on the south side. To tell you the truth, I hadn't seen Wrigley Field in person until the early 90's. However, it really dawned on me in the late 80's when I would cheer for the White Sox.

While I was in the Army, I confess I did toot the Cubs horn a bit. Think about it...every time a Chicago baseball team was on TV, it was the Cubs. And I was constantly bragging about how great Chicago is, so the Cubs were a part of that bragging. It's funny when you talk about Chicago to someone...this city is so unique that you might as well be speaking a foreign language when talking about the virtues of deep dish pizza, the Chicago hot dog, Michigan Avenue, the Sears Tower, and our sports. All the emphasis on Chicago sports in the early to mid-90's was about the Bulls, so Michael Jordan was all the rage to talk about. We all know how MJ stole the thunder from the Sox in 1993 when rumors of his first "retirement" leaked during the start of the ALCS vs. Toronto that year. More non-Chicagoans talked so much trash to me...ESPECIALLY THE NEW YORKERS, because they were tired of MJ and the Bulls beating them so much. They actually thought their NBA team had a chance to win.

After I left the service, I realized the "one team or the other" philosophy, and decided the White Sox were worthy of my "devotion". I've always been able to relate more with the Sox fan base than the Cubs fan base. The Sox have always been more geared towards the "working man" rather than the Cubs "trendy crowds". Now, I realize the "trendy crowds" are going to be all over the place, but even in this "luxury-box", "super suite", "club-level" sports world we live in, the real fans are those who work from 9 to 5 every day...working their fingers to the bone to provide for their families and take care of their needs. It's people like us who are being priced out of major sporting events because the newer arenas and such are catering more towards the season ticket holders, suite holders, and those who can afford the high-priced seats closest to the action. But regardless of the price...we Sox fans still find time and make the effort to follow our team.

Okay...I've had my say. Let's hear from you.

SI1020
03-03-2003, 08:45 AM
It was the summer of 1957 and I was all of six years old. My dad used to like to watch the Sox when they were on TV. We had an old Motorola black and white. I started to sit with him and watch games. Very quickly I was hooked on the Sox, or stuck on the Sox as Rich Lindberg once wrote. I remember the Sox were swept by the Yanks in a crucial three game series at Comiskey late in August, knocking them out of contention. Bob Keegan had pitched a no hitter earlier in the month. Billy Pierce won 20 games that year. He and Minnie Minoso were my favorites in that order.

FanOf14
03-03-2003, 08:51 AM
I became a Sox fan when I was conceived. :D:

Hangar18
03-03-2003, 10:01 AM
My dad was a fan back in the 50's, so being the first born, I was made a fan. I remember we had a black & white tv, and we'd watch the games on tv like that, and i remember the radio being on and listening to the games. Doesnt compare to my first game ever, 6/22/75, was a day game, and we took the L to Comiskey. Bright, Blue skies. back then, the L didnt go straight there, as the RedLine back then just went to 63rd. We had to switch at State & Lake then take the Dan Ryan. I remember getting off the train and seeing the flags on the roof and the scoreboard and all the people....it was exciting. But when we entered the ramp and came in what was RF, i was blown away by how GREEN the grass was, and how bright the players uniforms were, and how big and colorful the stadium looked in Person. It was "Jacket" day, a cheap white vinyl jacket with the Red sox logo on the left side. they played the Twins that day, and beat them handily. Remember Gossage getting a "save". I remember my dad buying me hot dogs and popcorn and coke everytime the vendor guy would walk by.

Paulwny
03-03-2003, 10:06 AM
1955, Thanks to Mel Allen.

LuvSox
03-03-2003, 10:14 AM
The gift of 'Sox' was given to me at birth as my father was a long time season ticket holder at the old place. :gulp:

Procol Harum
03-03-2003, 11:28 AM
I guess by "always" you would have to mean that one was born into a Sox-rooting family. I came to Soxdom by a stroke of divine Providence, having no natural or family allegiances, as my family came to the Chicago area from the South.

When I was 6, Oscar Mayer was giving away plastic coins bearing the image of baseball players in packs of their hot dogs. My mom gave me a blue plastic coin out of a pack she had just opened for supper that night, and it happened to bear the likeness of one Nellie Fox. The rest is history... :smile:

Cheryl
03-03-2003, 11:31 AM
Me too, Procol. My parents moved to the West Side actually in the 50s. We were in Oak Lawn when I was born. Since Dad is a diehard Cardinals fan and we lived closer to Comiskey than to Wrigley, that's how I ended up a Sox fan.

voodoochile
03-03-2003, 12:39 PM
It was fall of 1979 - winter of 1980. I was 16 and I had been following baseball for about 6 years (Oakland A's in the early 70's like lots of kids back then). No one in my family was a big sport's fan, but my dad used to take me to games - especially opening days. I became more of a flubbies fan. Then after the 1979 season, I became extremely disgusted with the team - convinced they would never win anything. I read a bunch of articles by Mike Royko where he wrote that he was dropping the flubbies and becoming a Sox fan since I was feeling the same way I followed suit. I made it Mike didn't. 1983 solidified my feelings and I have never looked back. Though I must admit - I never started actively disliking the flubbies until I started hanging out on the Internet and in reality, I still don't. I just feel sorry for their blindly loyal fans - and I don't care for ShamME, but I mainly just ignore the flubbies.

gogosoxgogo
03-03-2003, 01:21 PM
I grew up and still live on the north side in a heavily Cub-trafficed area. Thank God for the fact that my father was a Sox fan, and by the time I actually starting sitting down and watching baseball, the Sox were busy clinching their division (93, 94). Unfortunately... my younger brother didn't make it, poor soul.

Procol Harum
03-03-2003, 01:31 PM
Originally posted by Cheryl
Since Dad is a diehard Cardinals fan

Mine, too. Back in the days before expansion, the Cards were the team of choice for Southerners. I have always tended to root for them in the NL, although their ghastly stadium and long-time astroturf were hardly an attraction. But the fact that they were major rivals of the Grubs more than made up for that....

Fisk72
03-03-2003, 01:31 PM
I was raised a Sox fan and don't have any regrets. I suppose the same can be said about being a ND fan. So much a fan that I had to go there and accrue way too much debt. And of course, I'll be splurging every year for the Sox, as well. That's America for you, I suppose. :gulp:

jeremyb1
03-03-2003, 01:37 PM
i don't know how it would've ever been possible for me to have ever been anything other than a sox fan. i was bred a sox, bulls, bears, and u of i fan. i don't see how it could've transpired any other way. the sox have always been closest to my heart and i think that goes for my dad too. my dad's father died when i was seven but one of my few memories of him was watching the sox it was just a huge part of my dad's life and now mine.

Hangar18
03-03-2003, 01:51 PM
Originally posted by Cheryl
Me too, Procol. My parents moved to the West Side actually in the 50s. We were in Oak Lawn when I was born. Since Dad is a diehard Cardinals fan and we lived closer to Comiskey than to Wrigley, that's how I ended up a Sox fan.

Theres an Old Proverb that states: "The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend" (Didnt Alexander The Great adopt that theory when "conquering" his "enemies"?) That being said, Im cordial with a lot of Cardinal Fans. Do detest the national league though, but I have nothing against Cardinal Fans. Went to StLouis a couple yrs ago to see the SOX vs Cards. Those fans are really nice people.

Sad
03-03-2003, 02:09 PM
probably around mid-70's for me...
I remember I was right around 9? years old when Dad took us to our first SOX game

my great-uncle lived in Whiting, IN next to a tavern that always was full of SOX-fans... I remember walking in there one day with my old hat on and got a big cheer for wearing the right hat (also free pop and candy)

oddly enough, after almost 30 years of visiting Chicago, my first trip to Wrigley was just last year... weird

Ventura23Fan
03-03-2003, 02:45 PM
My father and younger brother are Cub fans. My older brother and I are Sox fans. My father used to take us to a couple of games every year to both Comiskey and Wrigley. When I was younger, I leaned a little more to the Cubs because they were on TV more those days. My favorite was Rick Monday. The day the Sox signed Pudge Fisk I became a Sox fan and never looked back. Catcher was the position I played. I even wore #72 throughout my high school playing days ('82-'86).

Iwritecode
03-03-2003, 02:46 PM
After stopping and thinking about it, I'd have to say I became a fan somewhere around either 91 or 92. That's about when I started following professional sports (Bulls and Sox). Neither of my parents follow sports at all and there isn't a whole lot of media coverage of the teams in Rockford either. I think the Bulls winning the championship forced the coverage a little more those years though. I don't recall anything about the team in the 80's and didn't make it to my first Sox game until 1992. So I never got to visit Old Comiskey either. That is also about the time they switched the uniforms from those ugly red white and blue to black and silver. There's a reason black is my favorite color... ;) I sort of lost interest after the strike in '94 but really came back again about '99 or so when I stumbled across the ESPN troll board. Then I found this site (then on rivals) and the rest is history...

soxruleEP
03-03-2003, 02:53 PM
I grew up in Syracuse NY. My father and everyone around me were Yankee fans. It being the perverse '60s, I naturally decided that I would not cheer for the Yankees (who also seemed to always steal the best players from our hometown Syracuse Chiefs just as the International League playoffs began). I followed the Dodgers.

I went to college in Indiana and met a woman from Joliet whose entire family were Sox fans. We got married in 1977 and moved to Chicago, just in time for the Hitmen.

Since then I have been a Sox fan. I thank God that my wife's family were Southsiders and Joliet folk and I was saved from the cancer that is the SCrubs.

sox_fan_forever
03-03-2003, 05:31 PM
I voted as recently becoming a Sox fan because I've only been a Sox fan since 2000, when I was 13.

I grew up a Braves fan since that is what my dad is. Then in 2000 I started hearing that the Sox were doing pretty good, so I started watching the games sometimes, but I still considered myself to be a Braves fan. Then about a year later (June 2001) I was playing around online and I found WSI. Since then there has been no looking back. The Sox are, and always will be, my # 1 team.

doublem23
03-03-2003, 05:59 PM
I'm only 19 now, but I can remember rooting for the White Sox for as long as I remember. I also remember a phase when I was quite a youngin' of rooting for both the Sox and the Cubs. Since I grew up on the Northwest Side of the city, rooting for the Cubs was the thing to do. My dad is a Sox fan, though, and in 1992 and 1993 he got a lot of tickets to games from work and he took me with a lot. When they won the division in 1993, that sealed the deal for me. That and Robin Ventura was (and in some ways, still is) more important to me than Jesus.

SouthSideHitman
03-03-2003, 08:22 PM
My dad grew up in Jersey and he was a yankees fan (sigh) until he moved out to Chicago to go to the U of C. Long story short, he got there in the early 70s when neither Chicago team was very good and he became a Sox fan out due to geography and his love of the AL. He raised me as a Sox fan from birth and we always had season tickets until the strike. My father, however never found any real hatred of the cubs or yanks, which means that I learned that the old-fashioned way. Through experience.

I just consider myself lucky that my mom found work at the University of Chicago and then IIT and moved to Hyde Park with my dad instead of the other way around. If he had moved to, Evanston, I might have grown up a baseball philistine.

wassagstdu
03-03-2003, 10:20 PM
My first memory: sitting halfway up in the lower deck on the left side of Comiskey -- on Luke Appling Day, 1947 -- my father next to me saying "There he is, there's Luke Appling." I was 3. My next memory, about the same time: my father took me to Wrigley for the first time, I ate too many peanuts and threw up on the bus on the way home. Ever since I have been a fan of the Sox and the Cubs have made me sick!

guillen4life13
03-03-2003, 10:23 PM
What do I write? I started following them in 00, which is pretty recent, but I'm still growing up! I voted became a fan recently.

Before I learned to appreciate Baseball, the only attention I gave to it was the Sosa HR chase. Even then, I had only been to a few Sox games, so I badmouthed him even though I had no idea what I was talking about. Now I have somewhat of an idea.

SOX FOR LIFE!!

fuzzy_patters
03-03-2003, 10:28 PM
I have loved the Sox for as long as I can remember. I still remember throwing nerf balls against the walls of my living room hoping to be the next Rich Dotson.

bigfoot
03-03-2003, 10:42 PM
When just a wee lad, not much more than weaned, I would be fascinated by the images on WGN. Ray Rayner, Captain K, Romper Room and the cartoons would keep me out of trouble for hours. No strange psuedo-adult content of the soaps, just a bit of news at noon, Bozo,et.al., then more mind sapping pap, how was I to know that it was supposed to be baseball. The Cobz, as my Grandpa would call 'em, always gave Bozo a run for his comedy dollar. But when it came to REAL BASEBALL, the Sox were the real deal. First game as a youth on a Little League trip, right field grandstand seats, lower deck, someone hit a screamer and broke a seatback. I don't remember who hit it, I didn't get that ball, but I was hooked like a Coho. I've survived; the Crash of '67, Asto-turf,Disco-demo,Yuppie Scum,the Troughs,Fools of Addison,Destruction of McCuddy's(sniff),Drunken Weasels from the Field of Weeds. Still here to claim the right to vote with my feet if the Sox leave it on the field, I'm w/'em win or lose. Not a Sheeple from the N/Side. You'll never hear me complain about how long a game is, that's why it's the BEST GAME. Cobz will ALWAYS be something to scrap off the bottom of your boot. and the SteinYankees can NEVER win again, and it still be too soon!
That's all folks,
Bigfoot

voodoochile
03-03-2003, 10:45 PM
Originally posted by bigfoot
When just a wee lad, not much more than weaned, I would be fascinated by the images on WGN. Ray Rayner, Captain K, Romper Room and the cartoons would keep me out of trouble for hours. No strange psuedo-adult content of the soaps, just a bit of news at noon, Bozo,et.al., then more mind sapping pap, how was I to know that it was supposed to be baseball. The Cobz, as my Grandpa would call 'em, always gave Bozo a run for his comedy dollar. But when it came to REAL BASEBALL, the Sox were the real deal. First game as a youth on a Little League trip, right field grandstand seats, lower deck, someone hit a screamer and broke a seatback. I don't remember who hit it, I didn't get that ball, but I was hooked like a Coho. I've survived; the Crash of '67, Asto-turf,Disco-demo,Yuppie Scum,the Troughs,Fools of Addison,Destruction of McCuddy's(sniff),Drunken Weasels from the Field of Weeds. Still here to claim the right to vote with my feet if the Sox leave it on the field, I'm w/'em win or lose. Not a Sheeple from the N/Side. You'll never hear me complain about how long a game is, that's why it's the BEST GAME. Cobz will ALWAYS be something to scrap off the bottom of your boot. and the SteinYankees can NEVER win again, and it still be too soon!
That's all folks,
Bigfoot

Welcome aboard...

Not bad for a first post, not bad at all...

:)

TornLabrum
03-03-2003, 11:15 PM
Spring or summer of 1955 (I really don't know which. After all, I was only five at the time.

I was out playing in the yard and decided to go visit my grandparents who lived two doors away. We always went in the back door, through the kitchen. When I got into the living room, my grandpa was watching a Sox game on the TV. (This is my first recollection of baseball, too.) Just as I came in, I heard Jack Brickhouse going crazy. "Atta boy Chico!" He then started talking about how Carrasquel hit a home run.

I asked my grandpa what channel it was on, and he told me channel 9. I ran home yelling, "Carousel hit a homer!" I had no idea what it meant, but it was the most exciting thing I'd ever heard or seen. I turned on the TV, and that was it. I've been a Sox fan ever since.

I've been able to tell both Jack Brickhouse and Chico Carrasquel the story. Brickhouse was very gracious (considering it was at a Cubs convention). Carrasquel was, too, even asking again what year it was. "1955...." That was his last year with the Sox.

Interestingly enough, my hero within days was Minnie Minoso until he was traded after the '57 season. Then it became Nellie Fox, with Billy Pierce a close second.

Damn that was a great team!

ilovemags30
03-03-2003, 11:29 PM
i was around 8 i overhearrd my mother telling a family friend that my father was in a way disapointed that his sons werent/couldnt be involved in sports and he didnt think me *the only daughter* would be into sports so he thought none of his kids would be athletes... it made me kinda sad to know he didnt have anyone to watch/play the games with...

so i went and sat next to him rt after i heard that and asked him what he was doing... he said "im watching the best team in baseball... the white sox" as the game went by he explained to me everything that happened and told me stats. so it became an everyday ritual for me and him to watch the games togther. after that 1st season i became hooked... i absolutely love the sport and the team :D:

WhiteSoxWinner
03-03-2003, 11:56 PM
No one in my family is big into sports. I used to go to games with a friend and his dad. Luckily, his dad was a Sox fan, so I grew going to a couple games every year. It just grew naturally from there. The division win in 1993 really solidified my personal interest, and I have been a fan throiugh thick and thin ever since.

TommyJohn
03-04-2003, 01:49 AM
My parents were both Sox fans, so they introduced me to the
Sox when I was very little. I remember that my first Sox heroes
were Dick Allen and Wilbur Wood. I attended my first game in
1973. The Sox played the Yankees on an overcast weekend
day, Wood pitched and Dick Allen got a huge hit. I was only
four so I don't remember anything besides that. The date is
lost forever in my memory. The first game I can remember
attending in detail was Jersey Day, 1975. The Sox beat the
Brewers 9-2, Hank Aaron played, the Sox wives beat the Brew-
ers wives in a softball game and Claude Osteen's wife was
Fugly.

I also rooted for the Cubs in those days (although not as hard
as for the Sox) because of the games being on WGN during the
day. I did not start hating and rooting against them until 1983,
when Cub fans rubbed our noses in the playoff loss to Baltimore.
Until then, I thought it was the perfectly natural thing to root for
both teams.

Brian26
03-04-2003, 01:54 PM
I used to watch the Cubs games after school on WGN in the late 70's. In those days, Dave Kingman was the man, with Brickhouse in the booth. Sometime in late '80 or early '81, I switched allegiances to the Sox (age 9) after the Cubs went on a 15 or 16-game losing streak. I think it was harder to be a Sox fan back then because their games were on a UHF station that always came in snowy, and they played mostly at night.

steff
03-04-2003, 06:09 PM
I was born into it. Seriously.. from about age 8 minutes. My first picture I am wrapped in a Sox blanket :D:

Nixey 02
03-04-2003, 07:02 PM
I was a Cub fan until I was 9 yrs old. Up 'til that time, Cub games on WGN after school and park district (NW 'burbs) trips that only went to Wrigley shaped my allegiance.

I spent weekends in the Summer of '76 with my grandparents in Libertyville. My grandfather grew up on the southside and was a big Sox fan. Most every Saturday and Sunday I would the afternoon watching the Cubs. Without fail, my grandfather (a large, grumpy man) would come in from tending to his yard and ask:

"Whad'ya watchin'?"

My reply: "the Cubs"

"How the Sox doin'?"

My reply: "I don't know."

"Let's turn on the Sox."

Doing as I was told, I'd switch from the clear transmission of WGN to the "snowy" WSNS channel 44.

My grandfather would lay down on the floor, in front of the television, and watch the game. Even though he would be asleep within a half hour, I didn't dare change the channel. I soon was as familiar with the Sox lineup as I was with the Cubs. Before the end of that Summer, he didn't have to ask me to change the channel when he came in from the yard. Grandpa Stan was the best. He took me to my first Sox game that year.

The Southside Hitmen of '77 sealed the deal.