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View Full Version : Why Is Darryl Kile On Hall Of Fame Ballot


34 Inch Stick
12-02-2002, 04:15 PM
I am sensitive to the fact that he died tragically. However, he was obviously not HOF material. There was no need to waive the years of retirement rule to put him on the ballot. Is there some precedence where good players were placed on the ballot after a similar tragedy as an honor to the player's memory?

jortafan
12-02-2002, 04:24 PM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
I am sensitive to the fact that he died tragically. However, he was obviously not HOF material. There was no need to waive the years of retirement rule to put him on the ballot. Is there some precedence where good players were placed on the ballot after a similar tragedy as an honor to the player's memory?

When Thurman Munson was killed in a 1979 plane crash, he wound up being put on the ballot immediately. Not that it did him any good in terms of being elected. Apparently, the Hall of Fame says it now will automatically place players whose careers were suddenly cut short by death onto the ballot. It's not supposed to gain them any extra votes in terms of actually being elected into the Hall. Also, Roberto Clemente was elected to the Hall one year after dying because of similar excemptions that put him on the ballot immediately. But the policy is inconsistent. Nobody put Lyman Bostock on any ballot after his 1978 shooting death, not that he would have been elected.

Ol Aches & Pains
12-02-2002, 07:05 PM
Originally posted by jortafan
When Thurman Munson was killed in a 1979 plane crash, he wound up being put on the ballot immediately. Not that it did him any good in terms of being elected. Apparently, the Hall of Fame says it now will automatically place players whose careers were suddenly cut short by death onto the ballot. It's not supposed to gain them any extra votes in terms of actually being elected into the Hall. Also, Roberto Clemente was elected to the Hall one year after dying because of similar excemptions that put him on the ballot immediately. But the policy is inconsistent. Nobody put Lyman Bostock on any ballot after his 1978 shooting death, not that he would have been elected.

I'm sorry he died, but this is not Roberto Clemente we're talking about. Kile is about as worthy of the Hall of Fame as I am.

jortafan
12-02-2002, 07:14 PM
Originally posted by Ol Aches & Pains
I'm sorry he died, but this is not Roberto Clemente we're talking about. Kile is about as worthy of the Hall of Fame as I am.

I don't disagree with you. I am curious to see, however, if anyone actually votes for him. What would be worse is if he actually gets enough votes (5 percent) to remain on the ballot for future years.

OneDog
12-02-2002, 07:19 PM
Originally posted by jortafan
I don't disagree with you. I am curious to see, however, if anyone actually votes for him. What would be worse is if he actually gets enough votes (5 percent) to remain on the ballot for future years.

If Cardinal fans and Kile relatives lobby for him, I'm sure he would get at least a couuple of votes. Jim Deshaies lobbied for himself and got a vote, even Jose Rijo got a few votes. Whether or not he will get the five percent remains to be seen.

idseer
12-02-2002, 07:46 PM
Originally posted by jortafan
When Thurman Munson was killed in a 1979 plane crash, he wound up being put on the ballot immediately. Not that it did him any good in terms of being elected. Apparently, the Hall of Fame says it now will automatically place players whose careers were suddenly cut short by death onto the ballot. It's not supposed to gain them any extra votes in terms of actually being elected into the Hall. Also, Roberto Clemente was elected to the Hall one year after dying because of similar excemptions that put him on the ballot immediately. But the policy is inconsistent. Nobody put Lyman Bostock on any ballot after his 1978 shooting death, not that he would have been elected.

i could be wrong, but i remember this as ... someone WANTED to put munson on the list a la clemente but the idea was voted down. i remember a lot of people upset that, just because a special case was made once, the floodgates might open.
anyone know for sure?

Procol Harum
12-02-2002, 10:16 PM
More evidence (as if any was needed) that pro sports has utterly caved in to the deadly duo of sentimentalism and hype. Another example this evening on MNF when Tim Brown got his little record. I'm REALLY getting tired of all this stopping of games for plaque-giving and family momements. Make an announcement over the stinkin' PA, give the guy a hand and then get back to playin' the game. Grump, grump, grump, grump....

mike squires
12-02-2002, 10:20 PM
can't the baseball hall of fame simply have a section with ball players whom have have carreers cut short, with plaque and memorbillia? just a tought

jortafan
12-03-2002, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by idseer
i could be wrong, but i remember this as ... someone WANTED to put munson on the list a la clemente but the idea was voted down. i remember a lot of people upset that, just because a special case was made once, the floodgates might open.
anyone know for sure?

That's what I originally thought too. But it turns out that Munson did get on the ballot earlier than he otherwise would have, and that is what caused the uproar. The bottom line, though, is that he never got in, and now his eligibility is used up, unless the new veterans committee of players decides to give him a shot. Somehow, I can't see him getting Carlton Fisk's vote.

MisterB
12-03-2002, 04:46 PM
The only eligibility requirements to be on the HOF ballot are:

1) Minimum 10 seasons in the Majors
2) Have been retired for 5 years (which is waived if the player dies before then)

Kile had played 12 1/2 seasons, Munson 11 and Bostock only 4. Career performance only matters for election into the Hall, but any player who meets those 2 conditions gets on the ballot.

34 Inch Stick
12-04-2002, 08:55 AM
Is that death waiver really a part of the criteria. If so that answers my question very quickly. If not, there was no glaring need to honor Darryl Kile with the gesture. If anything, putting him on the ballot in 5 years would reinvigorate his memory for the baseball world.

Paulwny
12-04-2002, 10:06 AM
Originally posted by 34 Inch Stick
Is that death waiver really a part of the criteria. If so that answers my question very quickly. If not, there was no glaring need to honor Darryl Kile with the gesture. If anything, putting him on the ballot in 5 years would reinvigorate his memory for the baseball world.

From the HOF:
3. Eligible Candidates Candidates to be eligible must meet the following requirements:

a)A baseball player must have been active as a player in the Major Leagues at some time during a period beginning twenty (20) years before and ending five (5) years prior to election.

b)Player must have played in each of ten (10) Major League championship seasons, some part of which must have been within the period described in 3 (A).

c)Player shall have ceased to be an active player in the Major Leagues at least five (5) calendar years preceding the election but may be otherwise connected with baseball.

d)In case of the death of an active player or a player who has been retired for less than five (5) full years, a candidate who is otherwise eligible shall be eligible in the next regular election held at least six (6) months after the date of death or after the end of the five (5) year period, whichever occurs first.

e)Any player on Baseball's ineligible list shall not be an eligible candidate.

34 Inch Stick
12-04-2002, 10:23 AM
That seems to clear it up. Thanks. I don't know why death would be a factor for making a player eligible but if that's the rule, Kile fits.

When you think about it death is a good reason for making the HOF wait 5 years to vote. A five year wait takes away sentimentality and refocuses on actualy baseball accomplishment.