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RKMeibalane
10-22-2002, 10:49 PM
The general consensus amonst White Sox fans is that Jerry Reinsdorf must sell the team, preferably sometime within the next five years. The best way to make this happen would be for fans to do the one they've been hesitant to do since 1994. That's right. Fans should return to Comiskey Park.

For years, Reinsdorf has said something to effect of, "Losing is your fault, fans. If you come to the park more often, I will start to spend money. Otherwise, I won't do anything, because you have not been loyal to me."

However, one has to wonder how Reinsdorf would react if attendance suddenly skyrocketed. Would he fire Ken Williams? Would he increase the payroll? Hmmm...

As I see it, there are two possible outcomes of increased attendance.

1. Reinsdorf keeps his promise, and the payroll is raised. The Sox have the money to accquire big-name talent, and they waste little time doing so. The Sox quickly catapault to the top of the American League, and more fans show up at the ballpark. All is well on the Southside.

2. Reinsdorf reveals that he really is a worm. He keeps the extra money for himself, and continues to outrage the few fans the Sox have left. The media backlash is enormous. Every major paper from New York to Los Angeles rips JR and urges him to sell the team. The Sox are finally sold, as JR discovers that he has worn out his welcome in Major League Baseball, and the new owner proceeds to fire Ken Williams, as well as to do everything Reinsdorf never would.

Lip Man 1
10-23-2002, 12:27 AM
RK:

My personal opinion is that even if the Sox drew 3 million, Uncle Jerry wouldn't do squat.

I base that on a number of reasons but especially this one...if it was so important to Uncle Jerry and his organization, why in the past ten years or so haven't the Sox EVER stated a specific number of fans they needed to draw in order to start turning a profit (LOL) and going out to acquire talent? Why do they always rip the fans but NEVER say, "we need to draw 2.3 million or 2.6 million..."

ANSWER: Because as you suggest, Sox fans might just show up to stick it to Uncle Jerry. He can't take that chance of being forced to raise the payroll to say 75 million and hire a competent independent GM. So they rip the public (and the media) without setting any specifics.

That's why, if Sox fans showed up, Uncle Jerry would laugh all the way to the bank. So, as has been stated many times in many places, Sox fans REFUSE to show up at the park.

THEY DON'T TRUST REINSDORF (and with good reason!)

As Phil Rogers stated in his interview with me, until a new owner is in place, this team will remain in serious trouble.

But take heart, Uncle Jerry turns 66 soon, and like the Rolling Stones sang..."time waits for no one..."

I only hope I'll outlive the scumbag.

Lip

RichH55
10-23-2002, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by Lip Man 1
RK:

My personal opinion is that even if the Sox drew 3 million, Uncle Jerry wouldn't do squat.

I base that on a number of reasons but especially this one...if it was so important to Uncle Jerry and his organization, why in the past ten years or so haven't the Sox EVER stated a specific number of fans they needed to draw in order to start turning a profit (LOL) and going out to acquire talent? Why do they always rip the fans but NEVER say, "we need to draw 2.3 million or 2.6 million..."

ANSWER: Because as you suggest, Sox fans might just show up to stick it to Uncle Jerry. He can't take that chance of being forced to raise the payroll to say 75 million and hire a competent independent GM. So they rip the public (and the media) without setting any specifics.

That's why, if Sox fans showed up, Uncle Jerry would laugh all the way to the bank. So, as has been stated many times in many places, Sox fans REFUSE to show up at the park.

THEY DON'T TRUST REINSDORF (and with good reason!)

As Phil Rogers stated in his interview with me, until a new owner is in place, this team will remain in serious trouble.

But take heart, Uncle Jerry turns 66 soon, and like the Rolling Stones sang..."time waits for no one..."

I only hope I'll outlive the scumbag.

Lip


Been trying this with the Wirtz for years and to use your Rolling Stones mention ....well old man Wirtz looks worse for wear than Keith Richards....isnt getting me anywhere

duke of dorwood
10-23-2002, 08:46 AM
He will NEVER fire Williams

Dan H
10-23-2002, 06:06 PM
Originally posted by RKMeibalane
The general consensus amonst White Sox fans is that Jerry Reinsdorf must sell the team, preferably sometime within the next five years. The best way to make this happen would be for fans to do the one they've been hesitant to do since 1994. That's right. Fans should return to Comiskey Park.

For years, Reinsdorf has said something to effect of, "Losing is your fault, fans. If you come to the park more often, I will start to spend money. Otherwise, I won't do anything, because you have not been loyal to me."

However, one has to wonder how Reinsdorf would react if attendance suddenly skyrocketed. Would he fire Ken Williams? Would he increase the payroll? Hmmm...

As I see it, there are two possible outcomes of increased attendance.

1. Reinsdorf keeps his promise, and the payroll is raised. The Sox have the money to accquire big-name talent, and they waste little time doing so. The Sox quickly catapault to the top of the American League, and more fans show up at the ballpark. All is well on the Southside.

2. Reinsdorf reveals that he really is a worm. He keeps the extra money for himself, and continues to outrage the few fans the Sox have left. The media backlash is enormous. Every major paper from New York to Los Angeles rips JR and urges him to sell the team. The Sox are finally sold, as JR discovers that he has worn out his welcome in Major League Baseball, and the new owner proceeds to fire Ken Williams, as well as to do everything Reinsdorf never would.

Forcing Reinsdorf's hand is not a bad idea. However, it has been my contention that too many fans have been turned off and they just don't care enough. The hard core fan base has dwindled. That is a fact that many don't want to accept.

Reinsdorf has a huge credibility problem, and it just hasn't been addressed. Rightly or wrongly, many don't believe he is really interested in winning. An obstacle like that is extremely tough to overcome. If the White Sox truly admitted to themselves that they have a real problem, they might make some headway in solving it. Until then attendance will remain as an issue.