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duke of dorwood
10-10-2002, 08:26 AM
FRom the Baltimore Sun:

. Those who study fan behavior say a winning record is important, but it isn't the only decision-maker. Ticket costs, economic trends, availability of competing entertainment options and the perception of demand also contribute.

: If their tickets are no longer perceived as hard to get, people won't try so hard to get them. Pressure to buy early and lock up seats with a costly season-ticket package lessens as memories of sellouts fade.
If consumers perceive something to be scarce, it creates demand. And if the perception of scarcity begins to wane, the demand falls off," said Dennis R. Howard, a business professor at the University of Oregon who studies fan behavior.

The "psychology of scarcity" underlies the value of everything from antiques to sports tickets, Howard said. The phenomenon was described by Adam Smith, the 18th-century Scottish economist and philosopher.

Partly, it's a matter of status.

"One way to differentiate yourself is to say, 'I have something you don't have,'" he said.

Recapturing the allure might not be as simple as hiring a free agent.
Howard said his research shows that teams enjoy a jump when they move into a new stadium, but it lasts only a season or two, regardless of how well the team plays. After the honeymoon, the franchise is back to trying to establish a relationship with its fans, he said.

Howard suspects a stadium's novelty wears off after a few visits. Then the reality of cost sets in, and consumers must weigh a trip to the ballpark against other forms of amusement. Teams invariably boost their prices when moving to new parks. The Orioles, for example, charged an average of $8.48 per ticket in their last year at Memorial Stadium. This year it was $18.23, according to Team Marketing Report, an industry newsletter

Nellie_Fox
10-10-2002, 02:33 PM
Country music star Alan Jackson is a good example of this. I read that early in his career, he insisted on being booked into venues that were smaller than the number of tickets they could reasonably expect to sell in that market. As a result, the word very quickly got out that if you wanted to see Alan Jackson, you better buy your tickets as soon as they're available, or you won't be able to get one. This became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with his shows selling out immediately, even as he moved into larger venues.

I don't know exactly how you'd do this with a baseball team, since they have a fixed location, but its interesting marketing anyway.

voodoochile
10-10-2002, 02:36 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
Country music star Alan Jackson is a good example of this. I read that early in his career, he insisted on being booked into venues that were smaller than the number of tickets they could reasonably expect to sell in that market. As a result, the word very quickly got out that if you wanted to see Alan Jackson, you better buy your tickets as soon as they're available, or you won't be able to get one. This became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with his shows selling out immediately, even as he moved into larger venues.

I don't know exactly how you'd do this with a baseball team, since they have a fixed location, but its interesting marketing anyway.

It actually works well for the flubbies too. They make it appear as if you have to buy tickets early to get games you want. As a result they sell more tickets pre-season and in season ticket packages.