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DrCrawdad
10-05-2002, 09:20 PM
Bluesman, Sox Fan
http://www.muddywaters.com/art/mw_jam.gif
Muddy Waters


I just came across this in the new book, “Can’t Be Satisfied, The Life and Times of Muddy Waters” by Robert Gordon:

The author speaking about visiting Muddy’s dilapidated Chicago home, “He (Charles Williams, one of Muddy’s stepsons) took me to the room where Muddy slept, where Muddy lay in bed and watched the White Sox on TV.” - page xvii

“Days, Muddy stayed at home. He relaxed, recovering from the previous night, preparing to expend it all again that evening. Geneva would make him ice packs, which he’d wear across his forehead, lying in his bed or watching a baseball game on TV. The White Sox were his team, though he admired Brooklyn’s Jackie Robinson, who had recently integrated Major League Baseball.” - page 107

jortafan
10-05-2002, 09:48 PM
this should not be a surprise. Muddy was a South Sider who didn't live that far from the ballpark. And Comiskey Park was the site of so much Negro League history, as well as its White Sox moments. Besides, the White Sox were the first Chicago team to integrate, having had several African-American and dark-skinned Latino ballplayers before a certain other team broke down and decided that maybe, Ernie Banks was worthy of their uniform. It's no wonder that what little interest there was/is in baseball among Chicago black people would be focused on our team, rather than the Baby Bruins. (That nickname makes me want to gag, but Cub fans probably think it's cute)

PaleHoseGeorge
10-06-2002, 01:48 AM
Originally posted by DrCrawdad
Bluesman, Sox Fan
http://www.muddywaters.com/art/mw_jam.gif
Muddy Waters .... The White Sox were his team, though he admired Brooklyn’s Jackie Robinson, who had recently integrated Major League Baseball.” - page 107

:muddy
<musically>
"You know the blues had a baby... and they named the baby 'Reinsdorf's Sox!'"

Nellie_Fox
10-06-2002, 02:18 AM
I wonder when this was written? Because Muddy lived the latter part of his life in Westmont. I remember when he died, reporters went into the blue collar neighborhood and asked people for their reaction. One person said: "You mean nice old Mr. Morganfield (his real name was McKinley Morganfield) was somebody famous?" He was so unassuming that his neighbors didn't know who he was.

SI1020
10-06-2002, 10:05 AM
I first started going to White Sox games at age seven in 1958. I remember seeing a fairly sizeable number of black fans at Comiskey in the late 50's and early 60's. We were of modest means and often sat in General Admission where we rubbed elbows with some of them. Many of the older black fans had a great knowledge and love for the game, and were passionate in rooting for the Sox. As far as Muddy goes I saw him play many times. One time in the mid 70's I was doing a youthful vagabond thing. While in Montreal I went to this little club in their French Quarter and who showed up to play, why Muddy and his band of course! Muddy Waters' legendary 1950's Chicago Blues Band with Jimmy Rodgers, Willie Dixon, Little Walter and either Elgin Evans or Fred Below on drums was one of the all time best.

DrCrawdad
10-06-2002, 01:41 PM
Originally posted by Nellie_Fox
I wonder when this was written? Because Muddy lived the latter part of his life in Westmont. I remember when he died, reporters went into the blue collar neighborhood and asked people for their reaction. One person said: "You mean nice old Mr. Morganfield (his real name was McKinley Morganfield) was somebody famous?" He was so unassuming that his neighbors didn't know who he was.

Nellie, this book is new. I'm not finished with it yet, but I've really enjoyed what I've read so far.

You're right though about Muddy residing in Westmont, and dieing there. Gordon's book says that Muddy moved from the westside of Chicago to the house described above with the money Muddy received from the hit song, "Hoochie Coochie Man" in 1954. Gordon says that Muddy lived there for 20 years.

Muddy was not only a baseball fan, but in his youth he played 2nd base. I can imagine that Muddy had special appreciation for your namesake.

1954-1974, 4339 South Lake Park
Muddy was then about 2-3 miles from Comiskey and 5-10 minutes away by car.

DrCrawdad
10-06-2002, 02:10 PM
Snobbish Cub fan
http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2002/10/03/will/story.jpg

OR

Bluesman Sox fan
http://www.muddywaters.com/art/photos/bigpix/kingbee.gif

I'll side with Muddy.

harwar
10-07-2002, 10:14 AM
Originally posted by SI1020
I first started going to White Sox games at age seven in 1958. I remember seeing a fairly sizeable number of black fans at Comiskey in the late 50's and early 60's. We were of modest means and often sat in General Admission where we rubbed elbows with some of them. Many of the older black fans had a great knowledge and love for the game, and were passionate in rooting for the Sox. As far as Muddy goes I saw him play many times. One time in the mid 70's I was doing a youthful vagabond thing. While in Montreal I went to this little club in their French Quarter and who showed up to play, why Muddy and his band of course! Muddy Waters' legendary 1950's Chicago Blues Band with Jimmy Rodgers, Willie Dixon, Little Walter and either Elgin Evans or Fred Below on drums was one of the all time best.
I also started going to White Sox games in the 50s'.I seem to remember during the late 60s' being at Comiskey and the whites sitting in left field and african-americans sitting in right.I wonder if this really happened as this was my big drug period.Anyway,i used live down in key west in the late 70s' and i stummbled into a place one night and John Lee Hooker just happened to be playing,What a night that was.The same thing happened at the pier house on the north side of the island when jimmy buffet came in drunk and got up on stage,it was great.

voodoochile
10-07-2002, 11:16 AM
When they used to have ChicagoFest, me an my buddies used to go down to Navy Pier and watch the blues stage all day long, regularly. Every year they would do the same trio b2b: "Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows" then Mighty Joe Young and close with Muddy Waters. Great shows...

harwar
10-08-2002, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by voodoochile
"Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows"

Man that guy was a regular at captain tonys(down the street form sloppy joes) during the winter.He was great and used to sit and drink with us afterhours.

DrCrawdad
05-16-2009, 10:02 PM
http://www.muddywaters.com/art/kingbee.gif
“Can’t Be Satisfied, The Life and Times of Muddy Waters” by Robert Gordon (http://www.amazon.com/Cant-Be-Satisfied-Times-Waters/dp/0316328499):

The author speaking about visiting Muddy’s dilapidated Chicago home, “He (Charles Williams, one of Muddy’s stepsons) took me to the room where Muddy slept, where Muddy lay in bed and watched the White Sox on TV.” - page xvii

“Days, Muddy stayed at home. He relaxed, recovering from the previous night, preparing to expend it all again that evening. Geneva would make him ice packs, which he’d wear across his forehead, lying in his bed or watching a baseball game on TV. The White Sox were his team, though he admired Brooklyn’s Jackie Robinson, who had recently integrated Major League Baseball.” - page 107I wanted to resurrect this age-old discussion to post a related note. I understand that in the movie, Cadillac Records, towards the end Willie Dixon drops in to visit Muddy Waters in his home. Muddy has a Sox game on his TV.

It's cool that they got that detail correct. Lifted my White Sox spirit on this day.

TheBull
05-17-2009, 12:38 PM
One time in the mid 70's I was doing a youthful vagabond thing. While in Montreal I went to this little club in their French Quarter and who showed up to play, why Muddy and his band of course! Muddy Waters' legendary 1950's Chicago Blues Band with Jimmy Rodgers, Willie Dixon, Little Walter and either Elgin Evans or Fred Below on drums was one of the all time best.

Little Walter (Marion Jacobs) died in 1968, so it was probably Big Walter (Walter Horton), George "Mojo" Buford, Carey Bell or even James Cotton. All of which played harp in Muddy's bands or appeared on his mid seventies recordings. Jerry Portnoy and Paul Oscher also played harp in Muddy's band during the 70s, but not likely to be confused for Little Walter. Regardless who was playing harp that night in Montreal, that had to be a treat to see Muddy and with that lineup.

tick53
05-17-2009, 01:53 PM
Check out the movie Cadillac Records. First of all, it's a must for Chicagoans or those interested in Chicago history. It's about Muddy coming to Chess Records (2120 So Michigan) and launching his (and others) career. Towards the end of the flick it shows Muddy, played to the hilt by actor Jeffery Wright in his home watch a Sox game with Billy Pierce on the mound. This is must see.

Sox
05-17-2009, 02:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez5izCf2DLI

Muddy Waters Hoochie Coochie man. This guy could really sing the Blues. I think I just became a fan of the blues.

tebman
05-17-2009, 02:38 PM
I first started going to White Sox games at age seven in 1958. I remember seeing a fairly sizeable number of black fans at Comiskey in the late 50's and early 60's. We were of modest means and often sat in General Admission where we rubbed elbows with some of them. Many of the older black fans had a great knowledge and love for the game, and were passionate in rooting for the Sox. As far as Muddy goes I saw him play many times. One time in the mid 70's I was doing a youthful vagabond thing. While in Montreal I went to this little club in their French Quarter and who showed up to play, why Muddy and his band of course! Muddy Waters' legendary 1950's Chicago Blues Band with Jimmy Rodgers, Willie Dixon, Little Walter and either Elgin Evans or Fred Below on drums was one of the all time best.

When they used to have ChicagoFest, me an my buddies used to go down to Navy Pier and watch the blues stage all day long, regularly. Every year they would do the same trio b2b: "Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows" then Mighty Joe Young and close with Muddy Waters. Great shows...

I'm in the same age bracket as SI1020 and observed the same thing. The grandstand in the left-field corner was where I often sat with my GA ticket, and I got a baseball education from some of the elderly African-American men who were regulars there. They'd seen it all and knew what they were talking about.

Voodoo's memories of ChicagoFest at the then-decaying Navy Pier are mine as well. The blues stage was the place to be, and one year my wife and I had to bail out because the crowd got so thick we were afraid we'd get pushed into the lake. For my money, Muddy Waters was the best. I can still listen to his stuff now and feel it like I did then. No surprise he was a Sox fan -- he had that South Side worldview that has no time for pretense and an appreciation for work with commitment.

"Cadillac Records" is on my must-see list. I haven't yet, but I will.

TheVulture
05-18-2009, 01:43 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez5izCf2DLI

Muddy Waters Hoochie Coochie man. This guy could really sing the Blues. I think I just became a fan of the blues.

That performance from Newport in 1960 is available on CD.

Chez
05-18-2009, 05:47 PM
I wonder when this was written? Because Muddy lived the latter part of his life in Westmont. I remember when he died, reporters went into the blue collar neighborhood and asked people for their reaction. One person said: "You mean nice old Mr. Morganfield (his real name was McKinley Morganfield) was somebody famous?" He was so unassuming that his neighbors didn't know who he was.

There is a stretch of Cass Avenue in Westmont named after Muddy. Apparently Eric Clapton, Mick Jagger, Keith Richard and other disciples used to visit him in Westmont whenever they were in town. Now THAT would be a great porch party.

veeter
05-18-2009, 06:09 PM
His son Joe Morganfield, played basketball for Wesmont High School in the mid- 80's. He was very, very good and kicked our Lisle butts twice a year.

Jpgr91
05-18-2009, 09:14 PM
I am pretty sure Muddy is buried at Holy Sepulchre.

ewokpelts
05-21-2009, 08:36 AM
Check out the movie Cadillac Records. First of all, it's a must for Chicagoans or those interested in Chicago history. It's about Muddy coming to Chess Records (2120 So Michigan) and launching his (and others) career. Towards the end of the flick it shows Muddy, played to the hilt by actor Jeffery Wright in his home watch a Sox game with Billy Pierce on the mound. This is must see.Cadillac Records wasnt a very good movie. And they played loose and fast with details.
But yeah, the sox bit was cool.

JNS
05-21-2009, 10:31 AM
I'm in the same age bracket as SI1020 and observed the same thing. The grandstand in the left-field corner was where I often sat with my GA ticket, and I got a baseball education from some of the elderly African-American men who were regulars there. They'd seen it all and knew what they were talking about.

Voodoo's memories of ChicagoFest at the then-decaying Navy Pier are mine as well. The blues stage was the place to be, and one year my wife and I had to bail out because the crowd got so thick we were afraid we'd get pushed into the lake. For my money, Muddy Waters was the best. I can still listen to his stuff now and feel it like I did then. No surprise he was a Sox fan -- he had that South Side worldview that has no time for pretense and an appreciation for work with commitment.

"Cadillac Records" is on my must-see list. I haven't yet, but I will.

In the mid 60s when I was 12 - 13 I would sit in the RF upper deck and hang with a crowd of old African-American guys. They all remembered going back to the old South Side Grounds a few blocks away to see Negro League games (as well as at Comiskey) and exhibition games between Negro League teams and barnstorming big leaguers, and former MLB players like babe Ruth in the late 30s and early 40s.

These guys really knew the game - they would bet on something on almost every play. Breaking ball or fastball. Will Peters (who had a good move to 1st) get the runner? Steal or no steal? Usually a quarter or 50 cents. Many of them had played ball - semi-pro or on company teams. Most were retired and in the 60s and 70s. It was a great experience for a 12-year-old in a lot of ways. I learned a lot about the game, but these old guys had a lot of wisdom on other topics as well.

Muddy as a Sox fan is no surprise. Before he moved to the burbs - once he was more financially secure (there was a suit that forced the Chess brothers to pay him his royalties) - he lived in a big old house on Lafayette or Calumet around 44th St. Almost walking distance to the park.

Cadillac Records was so-so. At least someone bothered to make a flick about those folks and their accomplishments. And it did hint at the way the Chess brothers - in the flick there was only Leonard, they obliterated Phil - ripped off their artists.