PDA

View Full Version : Inequities


34rancher
08-05-2002, 11:29 AM
Is it really possible for the Sox to compete? I don't mean for their division, I mean for the World Series? For that matter, can Minnesota, KC, Detroit, or Cleveland? It seems to me that the AL Central will never compete for the WS until some kind of Salary Cap is in place. A Prior example. Remember that Minnesota had the number one draft pick a year ago. They wanted to draft Mark Prior, but they did not believe that they could sign him/ Instead they took a local product that they felt would sentimentally sign for cheaper; Joe Mauer. What would baseball be like if it were like the NFL, where the draft is so important? Imagine the Expos with Larry Walker, Pedro, Randy Johnson, Cliff Floyd, Vlad, amongst others. Imagine if you will the Florida Marlins with Moises Alou, Gary Sheffield, Piazza, Clement, Alfonseca, Floyd, and Dempster still around. Imagine KC with Johnny Damon, Jermaine Dye to go along with Mike Sweeney. Imagine a player flat out rejecting the team that drafted them and sitting out a year just to go somewhere else for more money (See Bobby Hill and Jeff Weaver). Notice that almost all of the players that I have mentioned are on one of the five following cash cows: Cubs, Mets, Red Sox, Braves, or Diamondbacks.

As far as I am concerned, I hope that they go on strike. Level the playing field, learn from the NFL. Every team there at least stands a chance.

Jerry_Manuel
08-05-2002, 11:31 AM
The Twins owner doesn't want to win. He's one of baseball's richest owners, if they wanted Prior they could've had him. What they should do is slot the salaries of draft picks like they do in the NBA.

The Indians spent a lot of money under the Jacobs family, but their new owner is a cheap bastard.

baggio202
08-05-2002, 11:37 AM
Originally posted by 34rancher
Is it really possible for the Sox to compete? I don't mean for their division, I mean for the World Series? For that matter, can Minnesota, KC, Detroit, or Cleveland? It seems to me that the AL Central will never compete for the WS until some kind of Salary Cap is in place. A Prior example. Remember that Minnesota had the number one draft pick a year ago. They wanted to draft Mark Prior, but they did not believe that they could sign him/ Instead they took a local product that they felt would sentimentally sign for cheaper; Joe Mauer. What would baseball be like if it were like the NFL, where the draft is so important? Imagine the Expos with Larry Walker, Pedro, Randy Johnson, Cliff Floyd, Vlad, amongst others. Imagine if you will the Florida Marlins with Moises Alou, Gary Sheffield, Piazza, Clement, Alfonseca, Floyd, and Dempster still around. Imagine KC with Johnny Damon, Jermaine Dye to go along with Mike Sweeney. Imagine a player flat out rejecting the team that drafted them and sitting out a year just to go somewhere else for more money (See Bobby Hill and Jeff Weaver). Notice that almost all of the players that I have mentioned are on one of the five following cash cows: Cubs, Mets, Red Sox, Braves, or Diamondbacks.

As far as I am concerned, I hope that they go on strike. Level the playing field, learn from the NFL. Every team there at least stands a chance.

check out espn's "between the lines" this week...they had a panel on about the strike...jim bunning, former pitcher and republican senator from kentucky was on and he had a great take on the situation and his plan to fix it...plus he got into a discussion with torii hunter who was representing the players and made torii look like a fool...its hilarious...if all the players are as ignorant as hunter to the real problems of the game the game really could be in trouble...because the union leaders and lawyers will lead this guys right off a cliff like a bunch of lemmings...check it out

34rancher
08-05-2002, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by baggio202


check out espn's "between the lines" this week...they had a panel on about the strike...jim bunning, former pitcher and republican senator from kentucky was on and he had a great take on the situation and his plan to fix it...plus he got into a discussion with torii hunter who was representing the players and made torii look like a fool...its hilarious...if all the players are as ignorant as hunter to the real problems of the game the game really could be in trouble...because the union leaders and lawyers will lead this guys right off a cliff like a bunch of lemmings...check it out
Thanks for the heads up/. I would bet that a lot of them are not the sharpest tools in the shed. Remember, Baseball takes more kids with little to no education than any other sport. Most baseball players have never seen a college campus, let alone a classroom.

TheBigHurt
08-05-2002, 11:47 AM
Originally posted by 34rancher

As far as I am concerned, I hope that they go on strike. Level the playing field, learn from the NFL. Every team there at least stands a chance.

yeah that would be good

MarkEdward
08-05-2002, 11:50 AM
Yeah, the Twins are really having trouble competing, being in first place and all. And Cleveland's really been in the dumps these past years, winning the AL Central "only" 6 of the past 7 years, and "only" making the World Series twice. As for the Prior example, it's much harder to find a good catcher than a good pitcher. Mauer is a stud, and will be a great catcher for years to come. As for your Expos example, Randy Johnson was traded, it wasn't a matter of financial constraints. Pedro was also traded IIRC. Wayne Huizinga is an ass, and would've had a fire sale even if there was a salary cap in place. Besides, they got a lot of great prospects that are helping the team right now. The Royals could have kept Dye and Damon, but chose to throw away money on Neifi Perez, Roberto Hernandez, Chuck Knoblauch, and Micheal Tucker.

One more thing: a strike won't bring about a salary cap. You'll never see a cap in baseball.

34rancher
08-05-2002, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward


One more thing: a strike won't bring about a salary cap. You'll never see a cap in baseball.

Unfortunately I agree. Then again, I'll never see a WS in Chicago either, but I keep hoping. You have to wonder if baseball understands its own arrogance? IF there were a salary cap, at least the trades would be more equitable. I like the idea that someone brought up of a draft salary structure. Just give me some kind of hope that there will be a chance that even the Chicago White Sox stand a chance. As far as I am concerned, no team in the AL Central or NL East (with the exception of the Braves or Mets) has any chance in the next 30 years of WINNING the WS. That is a Major League Shame.

34rancher
08-05-2002, 12:31 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward
As for the Prior example, it's much harder to find a good catcher than a good pitcher.

And one other thing, then
WHY CAN'T THE SOX FIND EITHER ONE?

delben91
08-05-2002, 12:48 PM
Originally posted by 34rancher


And one other thing, then
WHY CAN'T THE SOX FIND EITHER ONE?

Well, we drafted the good catchers (see Zeringue and Richie), they just elected not to sign them after using an early draft choice on them.

MarkEdward
08-05-2002, 01:33 PM
Originally posted by 34rancher
Remember, Baseball takes more kids with little to no education than any other sport.


Post proof or retract statement.

voodoochile
08-05-2002, 03:28 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward



Post proof or retract statement.

I think it is just common sense. They sign high schoolers from third world countries to come play minor league baseball all the time. Also, while basketball is starting to sign kids right out of High School, it has been commonplace for years in baseball and the number dwarfs the number of high schoolers drafted by the NBA. Hockey is just as bad as baseball though (if not worse), with their minor league system and kids being signed in their early teens...

ma-gaga
08-05-2002, 03:33 PM
Post proof or retract statement

50 rounds of baseball draft.

2 rounds of NBA draft
7 rounds of NFL draft
9 rounds of NHL draft.

Odds are already stacked in baseball favor if you're just looking at the amount of uneducated. NFL players are ALL college players. NBA players are starting to get younger and younger, but 2 rounds vs 50 there is no comparison. There are so many highschoolers and foreign players taken, who knows what education they have...

MarkEdward
08-05-2002, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by ma-gaga


50 rounds of baseball draft.

2 rounds of NBA draft
7 rounds of NFL draft
9 rounds of NHL draft.

Odds are already stacked in baseball favor if you're just looking at the amount of uneducated. NFL players are ALL college players. NBA players are starting to get younger and younger, but 2 rounds vs 50 there is no comparison. There are so many highschoolers and foreign players taken, who knows what education they have...

So you base intelligence on whether a person went to college or not?

FanOf14
08-05-2002, 05:12 PM
I remember sometime ago the Sox had a pitcher that had a degree in physics - not an easy degree to get. College is only one type of intelligence, but baseball (in the eighties and ninties anyways) seemed to have a lot of guys that went past HS. Basketball seems to be more adept at taking high schoolers and putting them in the bigs immediatly (the last few years anyways).

ma-gaga
08-05-2002, 05:37 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward
So you base intelligence on whether a person went to college or not?

No.

You asked for proof of "little to no education". I give you the baseball draft. I'm not saying that reflects anything about the collective intelligence.

MarkEdward
08-05-2002, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by ma-gaga


No.

You asked for proof of "little to no education". I give you the baseball draft. I'm not saying that reflects anything about the collective intelligence.

OK. I was mostly responding to the statement that most baseball players aren't "sharp" because they don't go to college, that was posted by 34rancher in message 4. I find baseball players the most articulate and humorous of sports figures. Read "The Week in Quotes" on Baseball Prospectus for proof of this.

34rancher
08-05-2002, 10:15 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward


OK. I was mostly responding to the statement that most baseball players aren't "sharp" because they don't go to college, that was posted by 34rancher in message 4. I find baseball players the most articulate and humorous of sports figures. Read "The Week in Quotes" on Baseball Prospectus for proof of this.
Wow, did I start this fun debate? I will agree that baseball players and personnel are amongst the wittiest and are some of the best interviews, I do think that when it comes to labor negotiations that they are not the "sharpest tools in the shed". Donald Fehr seems to be one of the most intelligent men on the planet, but that does not mean that the almost 800 major leaguers are. Or for that matter that the owners are either. If they were, then they would understand the disgust that the fans are feeling now. I started this thread about my feeling on the inequities that exist. Face it, as much as I hope that I am wrong, the AL Central is a Major League joke. To prove my other comment, last year there was the following:

NFL: ZERO players less than juniors in college
NBA: Does anyone really care?
MLB: Several high schoolers, otherwise they cannot enter the draft until I believe their class would be juniors.

And as far as intelligence is defined, I would subscribe to the educational notion of the multiple types of intelligence. (Verbal, mechanical, athletic, social mathematical are all that I can remember from those old books.)

MarkEdward
08-05-2002, 10:45 PM
Originally posted by 34rancher

Wow, did I start this fun debate? I will agree that baseball players and personnel are amongst the wittiest and are some of the best interviews, I do think that when it comes to labor negotiations that they are not the "sharpest tools in the shed". Donald Fehr seems to be one of the most intelligent men on the planet, but that does not mean that the almost 800 major leaguers are.

If you read "Lords of the Realm," you'll see that many of the players were pivotal in the early negotiating between players and owners. I do understand that many players aren't bright, which is my problem with the upcoming "Outside the Lines." If ESPN really wanted a true discussion on labor issues in MLB, they should have asked Denny Hocking to be on the program. Instead they took a hotheaded loudmouth in Torii Hunter.

Finally, I don't disagree that many MLB players don't attend college. Even though all NFL players attend college, I'm sure some didn't have to do much in terms of studying and acedemics. Remember Andy Katenmoyer and his AIDS Awareness "class?"

Daver
08-05-2002, 10:52 PM
The NFL draft does not allow them to draft a player under the age of twenty one by rule,unlike any other draft system.That rule would probably change if the the NFL had a minor league system,but they do not,they are content to let the NCAA handle that for them.

If baseball loses it's Antitrust exception,and that could happen in the upcoming labor war,you may see MLB adopt a similar policy,because the loss of that exception will basically do away with the organized minor league teams.

Jerry_Manuel
08-05-2002, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by daver
If baseball loses it's Antitrust exception,and that could happen in the upcoming labor war,you may see MLB adopt a similar policy,because the loss of that exception will basically do away with the organized minor league teams.

What would the team do with their prospects then? Like what would happen to Honel?

Daver
08-05-2002, 10:59 PM
Originally posted by Jerry_Manuel


What would the team do with their prospects then? Like what would happen to Honel?

They would have to put put on the forty man roster or lost.

doublem23
08-05-2002, 11:37 PM
Originally posted by daver


They would have to put put on the forty man roster or lost.

Now, that would be crazy.

Jerry_Manuel
08-05-2002, 11:39 PM
Originally posted by daver
They would have to put put on the forty man roster or lost.

I don't like the sound of that.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-06-2002, 07:32 AM
The anti-trust exemption creates a lot of distortions in what the market for baseball would otherwise be. For example, the chances of ever seeing a competing league to MLB is virtually nil.

One of the famous cries of MLB is without the exemption, "the minor leagues as we know them would cease to exist." This begs the question, "Why should we care?"

All that "talent" that MLB teams contractually tie up has value. All those baseball promoters in cities that want baseball need ballplayers. There is a natural market of buyers and sellers. The world has bigger problems for Sox Fans to fret over than whether Jerry Reinsdorf needed to sell off his low-grade prospects to some minor league promoters.

BTW, most of those guys in the minors DID NOT get big signing bonuses. $5000 is not a lot of money to join the life of traveling by bus, eating fast food, dorming with teammates, and dreaming about a 1 in 100 chance of making the Show.

If you wonder why baseball players have such a strong union, consider their early formative shared experiences versus other highly-paid professional athletes. Most NFL and NBA players didn't do jack in high school or college. Life was served them on a silver platter. They go straight to the pros and get immediate rewards. Each of them is the quintessential arrested adolescent.

High school and college baseball players are pampered too, but the route most of them took to the Show was 100-times harder than their NFL or NBA cousins. It doesn't take too much for their union to jostle loose the memories these ballplayers have of what it was to be "adopted" by a family just so they could have a place to sleep while playing ball in Geneva, Illinois. Unlike NFLPA or NBAPA players, there is a certain solidarity amongst the MLBPA that is formed in places like the Midwest League--long before most of them ever get the big payback for their efforts.

The minor leagues will survive just fine. In fact, the games played in cities like Charlotte and Indianapolis will be infinitely better because they will be played to win. What they have now are barely more than exhibitions, with rosters constantly being shuffled on behalf of the major league affiliate.

Younger fans need to take their blinders off and consider the bigger and better world that could be if things were different. Kris Honel isn't going anywhere. He'll remain a member of the Sox regardless. As for most of the rest, things will work out just fine. For the sport of baseball, it would be a major improvement, too.

TornLabrum
08-06-2002, 08:45 AM
One of the famous cries of MLB is without the exemption, "the minor leagues as we know them would cease to exist." This begs the question, "Why should we care?"

The minor leagues as we know them are a comparitively recent development. Until Branch Rickey developed a farm system for the Cardinals, minor leagues were completely independent of MLB. Individual major league clubs might have working agreements with individual minor league clubs, but the minor leagues operated completely independently of MLB.

Some talent was signed by major league scouts and sent to clubs they had working agreements with. However, minor league clubs were also free to scout and sign talent, too. That's why Jack Dunn, who owned the Baltimore Orioles sold Babe Ruth to the Red Sox and Lefty Grove to the A's. He had them under contract, and he was going to get the best deal he could for them. In fact, Grove won over 100 games for Baltimore before he pitched his first major league game.

I haven't bought Bill James's latest edition of his Historical Baseball Abstract, but he really did a nice job of explaining what the minor leagues were like then. I would say the closest comparison you could make is a hybrid of the Nothern League and farm clubs.

I don't know about anybody here, but I find Northern League ball to be a whole lot of fun. The pitchers aren't under a strict count every game, and other pitchers aren't brought in for no apparent reason other than the fact they were scheduled to get their work in. The managers are playing to win ball games, and if somebody isn't cutting it, they are released, just like in MLB.

The talent level isn't as high as most Class A teams, but if the current system died, something would evolve similar to the old days where leagues went from Class AA to Class D. (I guess really that's the way it is now, they just added more A's and eliminated B-D so as not to hurt sensitive feelings of today's modern athletes.)

MLB and television helped kill the old minor leagues, leaving us with the system now in which the clubs are independently owned but staffed by MLB. But the Northern League and Pioneer League seem to be thriving. Maybe the time is ripe for more of that and less of complete control by MLB.

MarkEdward
08-06-2002, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by daver


They would have to put put on the forty man roster or lost.


If the NHL doesn't have an Antitrust Exemption, why are they able to keep minor league affiliates?

Daver
08-06-2002, 03:53 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge

The minor leagues will survive just fine. In fact, the games played in cities like Charlotte and Indianapolis will be infinitely better because they will be played to win. What they have now are barely more than exhibitions, with rosters constantly being shuffled on behalf of the major league affiliate.

Younger fans need to take their blinders off and consider the bigger and better world that could be if things were different. Kris Honel isn't going anywhere. He'll remain a member of the Sox regardless. As for most of the rest, things will work out just fine. For the sport of baseball, it would be a major improvement, too.

You might want to consider some of the points brought up in this PHG. http://www.baseballprospectus.com/news/20011126barkham.html

The draft and the minor league system would change dramatically.

Jerry_Manuel
08-06-2002, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by MarkEdward
If the NHL doesn't have an Antitrust Exemption, why are they able to keep minor league affiliates?

If Congress does completely repeal baseball's antitrust exemption, there could be some interesting long-term consequences. First, the minor leagues could be affected. Minor-league baseball today depends on the continuing existence of the reserve clause, which allows a major-league team to retain the rights to a player even after the player's contract expires. The reserve clause allows baseball to have deep minor-league systems by allowing the teams to retain the rights to many players who are not on their major-league rosters. The NBA and NFL have no minor-league systems at all. Hockey does have minor-league teams, but these are negotiated into hockey's collective bargaining agreement with its players.

PaleHoseGeorge
08-06-2002, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by daver


You might want to consider some of the points brought up in this PHG. http://www.baseballprospectus.com/news/20011126barkham.html

The draft and the minor league system would change dramatically.

Good link. I agree with all of the Barkham's points, especially the ones discussing franchise relocation. He's right that repealing the anti-trust exemption would bring quite a few changes to professional baseball.

However even Barkham isn't suggesting the minor leagues are hurt in any meaningful way--only that college and international leagues will likely become more attractive alternatives for developing major league talent. He even suggests the minor leagues would revert to the free state they previously enjoyed in the early 20th century. For fans in cities like Charlotte and Indianapolis, that's definitely a change for the better. They're getting glorified exhibition games now.

Daver
08-06-2002, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge


Good link. I agree with all of the Barkham's points, especially the ones discussing franchise relocation. He's right that repealing the anti-trust exemption would bring quite a few changes to professional baseball.

However even Barkham isn't suggesting the minor leagues are hurt in any meaningful way--only that college and international leagues will likely become more attractive alternatives for developing major league talent. He even suggests the minor leagues would revert to the free state they previously enjoyed in the early 20th century. For fans in cities like Charlotte and Indianapolis, that's definitely a change for the better. They're getting glorified exhibition games now.

I am not arguing that,but will they enjoy much success without MLB backing up their credit line? I don't think that a lot of these teams are self sufficient to do so,and if they are they will not have the training personnel,work out facilities,or coaching staffs that they have now,because they would be unable to afford them.


As far as the draft goes,it would become something similar to the NBA draft,without the NBA salary and bonus restrictions,because of the fact that if you draft someone you have to put him on your forty man roster or lose him to free-agency.The upshoot of this would be the big spenders would control an even larger percentage of the top talent from sheer ecinomics.

Jerry_Manuel
08-06-2002, 04:33 PM
Originally posted by daver
As far as the draft goes,it would become something similar to the NBA draft,without the NBA salary and bonus restrictions,because of the fact that if you draft someone you have to put him on your forty man roster or lose him to free-agency.

Why can't they slot the salaries for draft picks?

Daver
08-06-2002, 04:35 PM
Originally posted by Jerry_Manuel


Why can't they slot the salaries for draft picks?

You really think Don Fehr will allow that?

Jerry_Manuel
08-06-2002, 04:39 PM
Originally posted by daver
You really think Don Fehr will allow that?

Why does he care? I don't see why he has an interest in how much a team's draft pick gets. Then again I don't know anything about the labor situation.

Daver
08-06-2002, 04:41 PM
Originally posted by Jerry_Manuel


Why does he care? I don't see why he has an interest in how much a team's draft pick gets. Then again I don't know anything about the labor situation.

If they are on the forty man roster they are a meber of the MLBPA.

Jerry_Manuel
08-06-2002, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by daver
If they are on the forty man roster they are a meber of the MLBPA.

I can see why the actual salary would matter then.

What about putting a cap on a signing bonus? Same problem?

Daver
08-06-2002, 04:45 PM
Originally posted by Jerry_Manuel


I can see why the actual salary would matter then.

What about putting a cap on a signing bonus? Same problem?

Why would the MLBPA,which is violently opposed to any type of salary cap allow a cap on signing bonuses?

Jerry_Manuel
08-06-2002, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by daver
Why would the MLBPA,which is violently opposed to any type of salary cap allow a cap on signing bonuses?

I just don't see why it's a problem for them. Again I don't know anything.

Zednem700
08-06-2002, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by daver


You really think Don Fehr will allow that?

Of course he will. Minor league players are not members of the MLBPA. Therefore agreeing to screw them over doesn't hurt any union members. All the interviews I've seen seem to suggest that current MLBPA members have no problems dumping on the draft picks coming out of high school and college. They often resent the big bonuses guys get, and reason that if the draft picks get less money, they will get more. Of course all sorts of other issues will pop up, what will happen to guys who sign major league contracts, will somebody sue MLB because a draft with set pay slots restricts his freedom?

Oh yeah in response to the original post in this thread. THere are no real inequities in MLB. The problems that exist are the result of a set of owners who care a lot more about guaranteed profits than they do winning baseball. A salary cap will do NOTHING to improve competetive balance which was higher in the 90s than in any decade before. The NBA has a cap and of the last 12 championships, teams from the 4 largest metropolitan areas have won 11. In MLB teams from the largest 4 metropolitan areas have won 4 of the last 12 World Series.

Daver
08-06-2002, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by Zednem700


Of course he will. Minor league players are not members of the MLBPA. Therefore agreeing to screw them over doesn't hurt any union members. All the interviews I've seen seem to suggest that current MLBPA members have no problems dumping on the draft picks coming out of high school and college. They often resent the big bonuses guys get, and reason that if the draft picks get less money, they will get more. Of course all sorts of other issues will pop up, what will happen to guys who sign major league contracts, will somebody sue MLB because a draft with set pay slots restricts his freedom?


I was refering to what the climate would be should the MLB antitrust exception be disbanded,which would make any Minor League player not on a forty man roster would be a FA for all intents and purposes,and since there would no longer be the reserve clause to protect the MLB teams for their players in the minors those players would have to be on the forty man roster and subject to the MLBPA.

Zednem700
08-06-2002, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by daver


I was refering to what the climate would be should the MLB antitrust exception be disbanded,which would make any Minor League player not on a forty man roster would be a FA for all intents and purposes,and since there would no longer be the reserve clause to protect the MLB teams for their players in the minors those players would have to be on the forty man roster and subject to the MLBPA.

Oh sorry. I think though if baseball were to lose its anti-trust protection, the owners and the MLBPA would work out some sort of new system, they would have to really. I think its kind of pointless to try to figure out whether the MLBPA would accept slotted draft picks in a no-exemption world, because, well the draft may not exist at all, or at the very least look completely different than it does now.

ma-gaga
08-06-2002, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by daver
...will they enjoy much success without MLB backing up their credit line? I don't think that a lot of these teams are self sufficient to do so...

I think currently MLB claims all the costs of running their minor league affiliates (of course, they ignore the revenues). I don't have a ready link, but I'm pretty sure that's whats happening now.

I'm all in favor of removing that anti-trust excemption. It's giving Bud a little too much insulation. Remove that and watch them (Congress) skin him alive.

:)

:tool
"I plead the fifth. I don't recall..."

Daver
08-06-2002, 05:47 PM
Originally posted by ma-gaga


I think currently MLB claims all the costs of running their minor league affiliates (of course, they ignore the revenues). I don't have a ready link, but I'm pretty sure that's whats happening now.

I'm all in favor of removing that anti-trust excemption. It's giving Bud a little too much insulation. Remove that and watch them (Congress) skin him alive.

Paul posted a link to it a few weeks ago,the MLB teams pay the the cost of the training,medical,and coaching staffs,as well as the infrastrutce of the training faciliteies,the Minor league teams pay for the stadium upkeep and the players salaries through their generated revenue,I think,I am sure Paul will read this and re post the link though.

Paulwny
08-06-2002, 06:17 PM
Originally posted by daver


Paul posted a link to it a few weeks ago,the MLB teams pay the the cost of the training,medical,and coaching staffs,as well as the infrastrutce of the training faciliteies,the Minor league teams pay for the stadium upkeep and the players salaries through their generated revenue,I think,I am sure Paul will read this and re post the link though.

Found this on "How stuff Works" Rays and their farm club:

Major business expenses include rental of the ballpark (owned and maintained by the city), player-related expenses, payroll for around 100 employees (office, promotional, field, parking staff) on any given game day, National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues dues, and ticket taxes.

The Devil Rays negotiate and pay player salaries, and the Durham Bulls participate with them in paying for bats, balls, equipment and uniforms. Since umpires must remain neutral, the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues trains, assigns and pays umpires

Paulwny
08-06-2002, 06:30 PM
Originally posted by daver


OK so I only remebered it exactly backwards :redneck


Thanx Paul.


I'm now wondering about your real age. It's people my age who are forgetful. :smile: