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Bucky F. Dent
11-02-2012, 09:46 AM
The passing of Pascual Perez got me thinking about his brother, Melido. I had an inexplicable love for the right handed Dominican, and an completely unsubstantiated belief that, given enough time, he could become a dominant starter for the Sox. I looked at Melido Perez and I saw the next Juan Marichal. That obviously never took place, and to this day I have no explanation for what I saw in this guy and his game that led me to these absurd conclusions.

So, since we are headed into the cold dark days of the offseason, who was your guy? Who was the Sox player or prospect that you were damned certain was going to become the next Babe Ruth or Cy Young, who never turned into the all-star you had always dreamed he would be, and, in the words of Bart Giamatti, left you to "face the fall all alone."

SI1020
11-02-2012, 09:51 AM
I guess I'm not the greatest evaluator of talent because I've had more than a few of them. How about Fred Talbot, Ken Kravec and Chris Singleton for starters. Especially Ken Kravec.

Harry Potter
11-02-2012, 10:00 AM
Ken Hill

doublem23
11-02-2012, 10:10 AM
Mike Sirotka. Still have a jersey of his that I wear to the park on occasion.

The passing of Pascual Perez got me thinking about his brother, Melido. I had an inexplicable love for the right handed Dominican, and an completely unsubstantiated belief that, given enough time, he could become a dominant starter for the Sox. I looked at Melido Perez and I saw the next Juan Marichal. That obviously never took place, and to this day I have no explanation for what I saw in this guy and his game that led me to these absurd conclusions.

You shouldn't be quite so hard on yourself about Perez, even though he was never more than a middle of the road kind of pitcher with the Sox, he did seem to turn a corner in 1992, his first season with the Yankees. He was only 26 years old, posted a 2.87 ERA in 247 IP, struck out 218 (2nd in the AL behind only Randy Johnson). Unfortunately, I think he developed elbow problems either that year or in 1993 and that effectively ended his career. Sadly for him, reconstructive elbow surgery was still in its relative infancy compared to today. Had he come along maybe 10 years later his career may have been prolonged.

lpneck
11-02-2012, 10:18 AM
Greg Hibbard was my favorite pitcher on the 1990 team, which is my favorite non-2005 Sox team. I remember being disappointed when they lost him in the expansion draft and then he ended up having a pretty good year for the Cubs in 1993. Then he got hurt and was done.

Huisj
11-02-2012, 10:19 AM
For some reason, I was really hoping Danny Richar would become a dangerous gap-hitting moderate-power high-average second baseman. It was probably just a case of trying to find something positive during the second half of 2007, or it might have been because he hit a homer just a few rows from where I was sitting at the Jim Thome bobblehead walkoff game in September that month.

I also had an unhealthy hope for Kip Wells. That was probably partly due to the perfect storm of the Sox' farm system being overhyped, the availability of internet baseball news and scouting info exploding around that time, and me being in high school and gobbling it all up all the time.

Chez
11-02-2012, 10:20 AM
Joe Borchard, McKay Christiansen and Nyls Nyman.

palehosepub
11-02-2012, 10:33 AM
Bill Melton, the first player I really "latched onto" about 1969 as a 7 year old. Although he was a very good player who won a home run title I always thought he going to be a Hall of Famer. I would always argue with the Cub fans in the neighborhood how much better Melton was than Santo. Maybe if he didn't blow out his back he could have piled up some big numbers.

The scarey part is that I am now 50 years old and I still believe that Melton was better than Santo and Santo is a HOFer due to a Cubs / Tribune conspiracy.

Probably time for counseling or therapy...

tebman
11-02-2012, 10:52 AM
I've had several over the years myself. They seem insignificant now, but I was impressed when I first saw guys like Kevin Bell, Rich Wortham, Joe Borchard, and Josh Paul. They all looked like high-potential guys to me.

Shows how much I know. That's why Rick Hahn is the GM and I'm not. :tongue:

Madvora
11-02-2012, 11:28 AM
Kip Wells and Sirotka are great picks, but, Keith Foulke may have been the one for me though. For a while he seemed unhittable. When he was good, he was really good.

haganaga
11-02-2012, 11:59 AM
Scott Radinsky. When I was 16 I just thought he was awesome and that it was a mistake to have Roberto Hernandez closing instead of him. Just looked like he was throwing 100 mph every time.

Golden Sox
11-02-2012, 12:11 PM
PALEHOSEPUB: Before Melton hurt his back, I thought that Melton was better than Santo also. After he hurt his back he wasn't the same ballplayer. All I do know is if anybody thinks that Santo was better than Dick Allen, that person can kiss my dupa.

russ99
11-02-2012, 01:15 PM
No doubt, Lance Johnson. The 40+ SB years in the St. Louis system made me think he was the going to be the next Rickey Henderson after he got dealt here.

To a lesser extent, Carlos Lee after his first AB homer and games thereafter, I thought Chad Bradford was going to be our best closer ever, and I really liked Alan Bannister during the South Side Hit Men days.

As far as players who didn't end up having a decent career, there's hundreds.

Konerko05
11-02-2012, 01:31 PM
Kip Wells and Sirotka are great picks, but, Keith Foulke may have been the one for me though. For a while he seemed unhittable. When he was good, he was really good.

Kip Wells for me. I remember attending the second game of his major league career, which was game 1 of a double header against the Rangers. The White Sox won both games. Kip was throwing mid 90s with a power curve ball. He only gave up one run and struck out six, and I was in love.

He ended up pitching 7 games in '99, and I watched everyone one of them. He only had one bad outing, and I was convinced he was the next Nolan Ryan.

He never really had the same stuff when he came back in '00, and his control was awful. The velocity on his fastball seemed to gradually decrease until he was traded to the Pirates when his fastball magically starting hitting mid to upper 90s again. Even though his fastball came back to life, he still struggled with command and only had a few years of moderate success in the NL.

Thanks a lot, Nardi.

Foulke was by far my favorite pitcher with the White Sox for a very long time. I even modeled my style of pitching after him. I would only pitch out of the stretch, and I relied on a power changeup to get strikeouts. I don't think you can really include him though because he really was that good.

SephClone89
11-02-2012, 01:54 PM
Gordon Beckham.

ElevenUp
11-02-2012, 02:14 PM
Lyle Mouton. Big man who played in the SEC. I thought he was going to be the second coming of Big Frank.

thomas35forever
11-02-2012, 02:17 PM
Jeremy Reed and Danny Richar.

LoveYourSuit
11-02-2012, 03:32 PM
Jason Bere.

OMG was he good with that mid 90s FB to go with the Fosh Ball.

WhiteSox5187
11-02-2012, 03:49 PM
I thought Chris Getz would be a good lead off hitter for years to come. I also liked Lillibridge more than I should have.

TommyJohn
11-02-2012, 04:51 PM
For me it was Tim Hullet and Joel Skinner. I thought they were future All-Stars.

Frater Perdurabo
11-02-2012, 05:00 PM
Brian Anderson

LITTLE NELL
11-02-2012, 07:08 PM
Johnny Callison; after Veeck traded him after the 1959 season he went on to have a nice career. Before the 59 season the hype on Callison was huge, IIRC the Sox produced a special on him before the season and ran it on WGN. He was going to be the greatest 5 tool Sox player ever.

FoulTerritory
11-02-2012, 08:12 PM
For some reason, I was really hoping Danny Richar would become a dangerous gap-hitting moderate-power high-average second baseman. It was probably just a case of trying to find something positive during the second half of 2007, or it might have been because he hit a homer just a few rows from where I was sitting at the Jim Thome bobblehead walkoff game in September that month.

I also had an unhealthy hope for Kip Wells. That was probably partly due to the perfect storm of the Sox' farm system being overhyped, the availability of internet baseball news and scouting info exploding around that time, and me being in high school and gobbling it all up all the time.

Yeah, Kip Wells definitely. And here's the thing. When Kip came up for the first time in the 2nd half of, I want to say, 1999 . . . he was ****ing awesome. He was fanning people left and right and simply dominating.

Then, next season came around people thought he'd be our ace and he struggled right out of the gate and never again looked like he did in his first couple months of the majors. It ended up being Garland in the rotation for the 2nd half of 2000, not Kip.

It was just weird. Maybe he injured something and we just never heard about it.

Bucky F. Dent
11-02-2012, 08:28 PM
My player in the field was Ivan Calderon.

Frater Perdurabo
11-02-2012, 09:55 PM
John Cangelosi

michned
11-02-2012, 10:02 PM
When I was a kid my Dad had a complete man-crush on Royle Stillman. He played briefly with the Orioles for a couple years and looked good, then the Sox signed him as a free agent and he only played one season ('77) and hit about .200.

KenBerryGrab
11-03-2012, 12:22 AM
Bobby Bonilla. We stole him in the Rule 5 draft, and then Hawk traded him for Jose DeLeon.

waldo_the_wolf
11-03-2012, 01:41 AM
Yeah, Kip Wells definitely. And here's the thing. When Kip came up for the first time in the 2nd half of, I want to say, 1999 . . . he was ****ing awesome. He was fanning people left and right and simply dominating.

Then, next season came around people thought he'd be our ace and he struggled right out of the gate and never again looked like he did in his first couple months of the majors. It ended up being Garland in the rotation for the 2nd half of 2000, not Kip.

It was just weird. Maybe he injured something and we just never heard about it.

Didn't Kip get hit by a line drive or something in spring training 2000 and after that he seemed really timid on the mound?

And my player would probably be Joe Borchard. All the hype from when he was drafted through his minor league service up until he homered in his first game, and it just never happened. Although he's the reason the Sox got Matt Thornton so there's that one positive.

SI1020
11-03-2012, 01:25 PM
Johnny Callison; after Veeck traded him after the 1959 season he went on to have a nice career. Before the 59 season the hype on Callison was huge, IIRC the Sox produced a special on him before the season and ran it on WGN. He was going to be the greatest 5 tool Sox player ever. You are amazing. I remember that special. It was narrated by Jack Brickhouse.

WSox597
11-03-2012, 01:37 PM
I thought Chris Getz would be a good lead off hitter for years to come. I also liked Lillibridge more than I should have.

Guilty as well, with both of them. I just thought Getz was going to turn into an awesome player for some reason. I was upset when he got traded.

I always like Lillibridge too.

Guess that's why I'm not a GM. :D:

gobears1987
11-03-2012, 02:15 PM
Tony Graffanino. However, he did help the Sox in 2005 despite not being on the team.

DeadMoney
11-03-2012, 02:35 PM
Saw a lefty minor leaguer in Spring Training 2007 throwing in the mid 90s with a decent change and solid curve ball and absolutely fell in love with him. Loved the swagger and presence he had on the mound. It looked like he belonged on a big league diamond. His name: Gio Gonzalez.

LITTLE NELL
11-03-2012, 03:07 PM
You are amazing. I remember that special. It was narrated by Jack Brickhouse.

Yes it was Brickhouse who did the show. For the time it was something that you just did not see. I wonder what kind of a career Callison would have had if he wasn't traded away from the Sox. As I posted earlier he had a nice career but nothing approaching Super Star status.

TaylorStSox
11-03-2012, 04:10 PM
Borchard. Man, I loved me some Joe Borchard. I thought he was the next coming of Mickey Mantle. He pretty much soured me on prospects. :angry:

AshleyShaferBMW
11-03-2012, 11:35 PM
I thought Gordon Beckham would be a perennial All Star

October26
11-04-2012, 12:05 PM
The passing of Pascual Perez got me thinking about his brother, Melido. I had an inexplicable love for the right handed Dominican, and an completely unsubstantiated belief that, given enough time, he could become a dominant starter for the Sox. I looked at Melido Perez and I saw the next Juan Marichal. That obviously never took place, and to this day I have no explanation for what I saw in this guy and his game that led me to these absurd conclusions.

So, since we are headed into the cold dark days of the offseason, who was your guy? Who was the Sox player or prospect that you were damned certain was going to become the next Babe Ruth or Cy Young, who never turned into the all-star you had always dreamed he would be, and, in the words of Bart Giamatti, left you to "face the fall all alone."

I've been out of town (in Denver, CO) and am just getting a chance to get caught up on the latest Sox news; it looks like last week was a busy and productive one for our Sox. :D: Anyway, while scanning WSI threads, I found this one really interesting to read (thanks Bucky for starting it). I will add the name of a former Sox player who I thought would be great: Francisco Barrios.

If you don't remember him, you can read all about Francisco here (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Barrios).

I know his Bio reads like he didn't amount to much but when I was a kid, I thought Francisco would be great. I was excited to see a player with a Spanish last name (Barrios is a family name on my mom's side) who had such talent wearing a White Sox uniform. I dreamed of Francisco being selected to the All-Star game and of getting a Barrios jersey for Christmas. Neither of these things happened, although I did enjoy watching Francisco collect his career-high 14 wins for the Sox in 1977. Sadly, Francisco's life ended too soon at age 28 as a result of a drug overdose/heart attack.

white sox bill
11-04-2012, 02:11 PM
Back in the 70's, we had some good relief pitchers, most recall Gossage and Forster, but I always like Cy Acosta who was a pint sized Hispanic that was very good for a season or two. Without googling him, not sure whatever bacame of him.

The other 2 were Ed Herrmann because he wrote me personally after I offered to start his fan club (I was all of maybe 10) and then Lloyd Allen a obscure releiver that had but a handfull of games w/the Sox

thomas35forever
11-04-2012, 04:45 PM
Tony Graffanino. However, he did help the Sox in 2005 despite not being on the team.
So did Josh Paul, but I don't think anyone ever thought that highly of him.

Wedema
11-04-2012, 05:25 PM
Scott Ruffcorn-- #1 draft pick who never won a game in the majors!

TDog
11-04-2012, 05:32 PM
Bill Melton, the first player I really "latched onto" about 1969 as a 7 year old. Although he was a very good player who won a home run title I always thought he going to be a Hall of Famer. I would always argue with the Cub fans in the neighborhood how much better Melton was than Santo. Maybe if he didn't blow out his back he could have piled up some big numbers.

The scarey part is that I am now 50 years old and I still believe that Melton was better than Santo and Santo is a HOFer due to a Cubs / Tribune conspiracy.

Probably time for counseling or therapy...

I think Melton could have been a better hitter than Santo, although the numbers don't show it. Melton played in a notorious pitchers' park, and the friendly confines were very friendly to hitters. Santo also hit in a lineup with Billy Williams and Ernie Banks. Melton was strongly criiticied by baseball analysts for striking out too much (once as many as 107 times in a season), although there wasn't a big difference between Melton's strikeout and Santo's in the late 1960s. Over their careers, Santo struck out at a slightly higher rate.

Santo was clearly the better third baseman, especially early in their careers. Melton was an outfielder who was converted to a third baseman in the minors a year before coming up to the majors as a third baseman. The year they two were teammates, Santo played a lot of second base. But Santo was five years older and at the end of his career.

I never believed Melton was going to the Hall of Fame, but I have never believed Santo belonged in the Hall of Fame.

I was a huge Melton fan, though. And a huge Carlos May fan. When I was a kid, I thought of May and Melton the way Giants fans thought of Mays and McCovey. But it wasn't only Giants fans who were in love with Mays and McCovey, and, of course, baseball fans are still in love with the memory of Mays and McCovey.

Moses_Scurry
11-04-2012, 07:15 PM
I thought Dave Gallagher would win multiple batting titles and hit in the .300's every year. I also thought it was really cool that he invented some hitting device, but I can't remember now exactly what it was. Obviously it never took off.

soxnut1018
11-04-2012, 07:17 PM
I don't go that far back, but Joe Crede.

TDog
11-04-2012, 08:02 PM
I thought Dave Gallagher would win multiple batting titles and hit in the .300's every year. I also thought it was really cool that he invented some hitting device, but I can't remember now exactly what it was. Obviously it never took off.

That was the Stride Tutor. Gallagher got it patented in 1991, but a picture of Gallagher using it appeared in the Yuma Daily Sun in April 1988.

I was at the Ray Kroc Baseball Complex waiting for Mike Yastrzemski, who I was I writing a story about on a day when a game with the White Sox AAA affiliate was rained out. Outside the clubhouse, Jeff Schaefer was lobbing balls up to Dave Gallagher,whose feet were chained together as he was hitting balls into a chain link fence. Gallagher explained his invention and its purpose, and I took notes and took a picture. Mike Yastrzemski went into a terribly slump after I interviewed him, and he retired from baseball that summer. Gallagher was called up to the Sox in May and hit .300 for the season.

Today Gallagher runs a baseball academy in New Jersey, which by all accounts is very successful.

haganaga
11-05-2012, 12:19 PM
I thought Dave Gallagher would win multiple batting titles and hit in the .300's every year. I also thought it was really cool that he invented some hitting device, but I can't remember now exactly what it was. Obviously it never took off.

And he's been milking that device for years

HomeFish
11-07-2012, 12:49 AM
I was convinced that Miguel Olivo would be an All-Star catcher, and when the Sox traded him I was so upset that I wrote a song about it and posted it on WSI.

sullythered
11-07-2012, 02:06 AM
Gordon Beckham.

Me too.

Falstaff
11-07-2012, 08:01 PM
Back in the 70's, we had some good relief pitchers, most recall Gossage and Forster, but I always like Cy Acosta who was a pint sized Hispanic that was very good for a season or two. Without googling him, not sure whatever bacame of him.

The other 2 were Ed Herrmann because he wrote me personally after I offered to start his fan club (I was all of maybe 10) and then Lloyd Allen a obscure releiver that had but a handfull of games w/the Sox

Yes Cy Acosta was my first Sox hero, after my brother explained it was a GOOD thing that Acosta was getting everybody out. (As a child I liked to see hits and homers, did not understand both sides of the game.)

As an adult, my main disappointments were Rocky Biddle, Jon Rauch (we obviously gave up on him too soon) and Danny Wright.