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View Full Version : Thirty three years ago today....


DumpJerry
07-12-2012, 10:51 AM
...the White Sox forfeited the second game of a doubleheader.

MisterB
07-12-2012, 10:55 AM
...the White Sox forfeited the second game of a doubleheader.

Why? Did something significant happen? :whistle:

DumpJerry
07-12-2012, 10:57 AM
Why? Did something significant happen? :whistle:
The Earth opened up and swallowed parts of the field at Comiskey.

Paulwny
07-12-2012, 11:08 AM
Gee, too many Bees causing Night Fever.

tebman
07-12-2012, 11:39 AM
Gee, too many Bees causing Night Fever.

:rolling:

ChiSoxGirl
07-12-2012, 11:43 AM
...the White Sox forfeited the second game of a doubleheader.

The Earth opened up and swallowed parts of the field at Comiskey.

Gee, too many Bees causing Night Fever.

Meanwhile, I was three months away from being born! :tongue:

LITTLE NELL
07-12-2012, 12:09 PM
A day that will live in infamy.

Golden Sox
07-12-2012, 12:33 PM
I've always said that Disco Demolition Night was the one thing most baseball fans remembered about Bill Veecks second ownership of the White Sox. I was there that night and I will never forget it. It was one of the most shameful events in the history of the game. I couldn't believe it when a few years later Bill Veeck was elected to the Baseball HOF. When Disco Demolition Night was the most memorable thing about your ownership, that's got to tell you something about your ownership of the team. 4 of the 5 years he owned the team, the season was over with by June 1 of those years. I was glad when he sold the team after the 1980 season.

TomBradley72
07-12-2012, 12:41 PM
I've always said that Disco Demolition Night was the one thing most baseball fans remembered about Bill Veecks second ownership of the White Sox. I was there that night and I will never forget it. It was one of the most shameful events in the history of the game. I couldn't believe it when a few years later Bill Veeck was elected to the Baseball HOF. When Disco Demolition Night was the most memorable thing about your ownership, that's got to tell you something about your ownership of the team. 4 of the 5 years he owned the team, the season was over with by June 1 of those years. I was glad when he sold the team after the 1980 season.

I was there as well- a promo stunt that went out of control.

I wouldn't allow this one event to put into question Veeck's entire career in professional baseball- while far from perfect, he deserves to be in the Hall of Fame.

He acquired the White Sox shortly before free agency became a reality- that cooked his goose financially (and signing Ron Bloomberg to a big contract was not the brightest idea).

russ99
07-12-2012, 12:59 PM
I was 12 and mad that my mom wouldn't let me go. :D:

IMO, the real issue is just awful crowd control on an epic level. Nowadays there would be tons of extra security and cops.

LITTLE NELL
07-12-2012, 01:06 PM
What I can't figure out after all these years is what the hell was wrong with Disco music? I liked the Bee Gees, Donna Summer and Saturday Night Fever.

LITTLE NELL
07-12-2012, 01:16 PM
I was 12 and mad that my mom wouldn't let me go. :D:

IMO, the real issue is just awful crowd control on an epic level. Nowadays there would be tons of extra security and cops.

Veeck had no idea that over 50,000 would show up, he was expecting something like 15,000.

Irishsox1
07-12-2012, 01:49 PM
What I can't figure out after all these years is what the hell was wrong with Disco music? I liked the Bee Gees, Donna Summer and Saturday Night Fever.

In 1979 Rock & Roll was more than just music, it was something that young males used to identify themselves with and they were unhappy with what was on the radio. Add that in with a lot of Rock & Roll bands were making crappy disco sounding records, like The Rolling Stones "Miss You", Greatful Dead "Shakedown Street", Rod Stewart "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy", etc. and a lot of Rock & Roll fans were fed up with the disco music and the disco clubs. Dahl tapped into that growing angst. It was like the punk movement but without the music of the Sex Pistols, Clash etc.

Over time some disco music, especially the Bee Gee's has aged better than people thought, especially compared to hair metal or boy band pop but at the time, disco was seen as very crappy cheesy pop music.

WhiteSox5187
07-12-2012, 01:56 PM
Veeck had no idea that over 50,000 would show up, he was expecting something like 15,000.

He was also in the hospital that day and left the hospital when someone from the Sox organization called him and said that there were a ton of people around Comiskey before the gates even opened.

As bad as Disco Demolition was the idea of blowing up some records, while stupid, seemed like a fairly harmless idea. Ten Cent Beer Night however was a disaster waiting to happen and is also largely forgotten for some reason.

soxfanreggie
07-12-2012, 01:58 PM
Veeck had no idea that over 50,000 would show up, he was expecting something like 15,000.

People must really have dislike disco back then! :D:

DumpJerry
07-12-2012, 04:02 PM
I've always said that Disco Demolition Night was the one thing most baseball fans remembered about Bill Veecks second ownership of the White Sox. I was there that night and I will never forget it. It was one of the most shameful events in the history of the game. I couldn't believe it when a few years later Bill Veeck was elected to the Baseball HOF. When Disco Demolition Night was the most memorable thing about your ownership, that's got to tell you something about your ownership of the team. 4 of the 5 years he owned the team, the season was over with by June 1 of those years. I was glad when he sold the team after the 1980 season.
Yeah, I hear ya! The Milwaukee White Sox would have been great!:angry:

LITTLE NELL
07-12-2012, 04:22 PM
Yeah, I hear ya! The Milwaukee White Sox would have been great!:angry:

Veeck saved them from becoming the Seattle White Sox in December of 1975. If the Veeck deal had not gone through the Sox would have moved to Seattle and Charlie Finley was going to move the A's to the Southside.
Milwaukee got the Brewers in 1970 after one year in Seattle as the Pilots.

DumpJerry
07-12-2012, 04:35 PM
Veeck saved them from becoming the Seattle White Sox in December of 1975. If the Veeck deal had not gone through the Sox would have moved to Seattle and Charlie Finley was going to move the A's to the Southside.
Milwaukee got the Brewers in 1970 after one year in Seattle as the Pilots.
Oh yeah. Even worse.

I loved the Veeck Era. The four years he owned the team were the four years I was in high school. We had a lot of fun going to the ballpark those years!

central44
07-12-2012, 04:43 PM
In 1979 Rock & Roll was more than just music, it was something that young males used to identify themselves with and they were unhappy with what was on the radio. Add that in with a lot of Rock & Roll bands were making crappy disco sounding records, like The Rolling Stones "Miss You", Greatful Dead "Shakedown Street", Rod Stewart "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy", etc. and a lot of Rock & Roll fans were fed up with the disco music and the disco clubs. Dahl tapped into that growing angst. It was like the punk movement but without the music of the Sex Pistols, Clash etc.

Over time some disco music, especially the Bee Gee's has aged better than people thought, especially compared to hair metal or boy band pop but at the time, disco was seen as very crappy cheesy pop music.

I'm not positive about this (because I was born in 1989), but I was told that disco was basically rebranded as just "dance" music because the name "disco" had such a negative connotation. And that the genre has evolved over the years and led to what we have today, with the Lady Gagas and the Katy Perrys.

I don't know if that's true but it sounded plausible. In any case, reading accounts of that night just makes it sounds like a crazy place to be. And at least it's better than 10c beer night in Cleveland!

tebman
07-12-2012, 04:44 PM
Veeck saved them from becoming the Seattle White Sox in December of 1975. If the Veeck deal had not gone through the Sox would have moved to Seattle and Charlie Finley was going to move the A's to the Southside.
Milwaukee got the Brewers in 1970 after one year in Seattle as the Pilots.

All true. And it was Brewers owner Bud Selig who led the charge to prevent Veeck's group from buying the Sox from the virtually-bankrupt John Allyn, imposing an 11th-hour, million-dollar additional requirement on the purchase.

MLB was being sued by Seattle interests for moving the Pilots to Milwaukee after one season; Selig was neck-deep in that because he was the one who got the Pilots. If the White Sox went belly-up, MLB could move them to Seattle to get out from under the lawsuit. Then Finley could move the A's to Chicago like he wanted, allowing Selig and MLB to solve two problems at once. Veeck spoiled Selig's party by showing up to buy the Sox.

Veeck prevailed, but just a few weeks later the Messersmith decision came down, beginning the era of free agency that Veeck's group was not financed enough to deal with. We ended up with Rent-A-Player, Ron Blomberg, ballpark concerts to bring in cash, more stunts, and finally the disco inferno.

When in doubt, I say blame Selig. :tongue:

Medford Bobby
07-12-2012, 04:47 PM
I had a date for the next night on July 13th, and sat underneath the score board for fireworks night....bad mistake! :(:

I remember the field still looked bad from the night before....

BigKlu59
07-12-2012, 05:07 PM
I'm not positive about this (because I was born in 1989), but I was told that disco was basically rebranded as just "dance" music because the name "disco" had such a negative connotation. And that the genre has evolved over the years and led to what we have today, with the Lady Gagas and the Katy Perrys.

I don't know if that's true but it sounded plausible. In any case, reading accounts of that night just makes it sounds like a crazy place to be. And at least it's better than 10c beer night in Cleveland!

Disco was getting laid music... Gave people an excuse to shake what their momma gave them.. Overnight people turned into disco queens and Tony Manero's.. I was at ground zero, stationed in Lakehurst, NJ and experienced this phenomenon in person whether at the shore clubs or NYC. Also saw the coming of Bruce and the E-street at the Stone Pony that would send the next wave in that direction...

I'm still a rocker at heart, but you had a better chance with the ladies if you could handle the dancing ball and the coke noses...

Remenber rock was still hanging around.. Hotel California, Frampton, Zepplin,J Beck, Boston, Aerosmith, Kansas, Seger, Allman Bros, Lynard Skynard and their ilk were still engaged in Hoary Arena Rock..

BK59

cub killer
07-12-2012, 05:52 PM
I'm not positive about this (because I was born in 1989), but I was told that disco was basically rebranded as just "dance" music because the name "disco" had such a negative connotation. And that the genre has evolved over the years and led to what we have today, with the Lady Gagas and the Katy Perrys.

I don't know if that's true but it sounded plausible. In any case, reading accounts of that night just makes it sounds like a crazy place to be. And at least it's better than 10c beer night in Cleveland!
Disco is a type of dance music which evolved into house music in the 80s, right here on the South Side of Chicago.

House has spawned techno and other sub-genres, but the granddaddy of all that is Disco.

eastchicagosoxfan
07-12-2012, 06:02 PM
My older brother (he was 14) went with his buddy, his friend's older brother and his buddy. The older guys were 21. I was only 11. I was invited, but my parents said I was too young to go with that crowd. I was ticked off I missed it.

Lamp81
07-12-2012, 11:30 PM
All true. And it was Brewers owner Bud Selig who led the charge to prevent Veeck's group from buying the Sox from the virtually-bankrupt John Allyn, imposing an 11th-hour, million-dollar additional requirement on the purchase.

MLB was being sued by Seattle interests for moving the Pilots to Milwaukee after one season; Selig was neck-deep in that because he was the one who got the Pilots. If the White Sox went belly-up, MLB could move them to Seattle to get out from under the lawsuit. Then Finley could move the A's to Chicago like he wanted, allowing Selig and MLB to solve two problems at once. Veeck spoiled Selig's party by showing up to buy the Sox.

Veeck prevailed, but just a few weeks later the Messersmith decision came down, beginning the era of free agency that Veeck's group was not financed enough to deal with. We ended up with Rent-A-Player, Ron Blomberg, ballpark concerts to bring in cash, more stunts, and finally the disco inferno.

When in doubt, I say blame Selig. :tongue:
Charlie Finley should have just bought the White Sox and allowed the A's to move to Seattle. 36 years later, the A's still play in the same stadium, and are still a prime franchise to move. Were the A's ever on solid ground in Oakland? Has the SF Bay area always been Giants fans? This being said, I have no doubt the A's could be successful in San Jose. They just need to pull an Al Davis and move there, no matter what MLB says.

Nellie_Fox
07-13-2012, 12:59 AM
...I have no doubt the A's could be successful in San Jose. They just need to pull an Al Davis and move there, no matter what MLB says.Al Davis won in court because the NFL doesn't have an anti-trust exemption. MLB does. Apples and oranges.

Daver
07-13-2012, 03:13 AM
Charlie Finley should have just bought the White Sox and allowed the A's to move to Seattle. 36 years later, the A's still play in the same stadium, and are still a prime franchise to move. Were the A's ever on solid ground in Oakland? Has the SF Bay area always been Giants fans? This being said, I have no doubt the A's could be successful in San Jose. They just need to pull an Al Davis and move there, no matter what MLB says.

Charles Finley was vehemently opposed to arbitration, and sold his franchise shortly after the the establishment of the MLBPA, as he knew it would destroy his ability to profit from selling players outright, and he was smart enough to know that MLB's antitrust exemption could and would turn around to burn them, but without it the damage would have destroyed the league.

Dan H
07-13-2012, 08:29 AM
I've always said that Disco Demolition Night was the one thing most baseball fans remembered about Bill Veecks second ownership of the White Sox. I was there that night and I will never forget it. It was one of the most shameful events in the history of the game. I couldn't believe it when a few years later Bill Veeck was elected to the Baseball HOF. When Disco Demolition Night was the most memorable thing about your ownership, that's got to tell you something about your ownership of the team. 4 of the 5 years he owned the team, the season was over with by June 1 of those years. I was glad when he sold the team after the 1980 season.

I was glad he sold the team, too, because he didn't have the money to comptete in the free agent market. Veeck had his faults including the embarrassment of Disco Demolition Night. However, he did many things in his Chicago baseball career and Disco Demolition far from summarizes his legacy. The memory of Disco Demolition is kept alive by many who see it as an historic event, but don't look behind the root causes of the promotion. We can never forget it; no one will let us. But Disco Demolition is the most over-hyped single event in Chicago sports history. Many things that have happened since should over-shadow it. As far as I am concerned it isn't really worth talking about anymore.

russ99
07-13-2012, 08:54 AM
Oh yeah. Even worse.

I loved the Veeck Era. The four years he owned the team were the four years I was in high school. We had a lot of fun going to the ballpark those years!

Me too. Always fun a the ole ball park (to paraphase Harry) when Veeck owned the team.

Veeck never had enough payroll cash to really compete, other than his pre-free agent specials for on season but it was always fun to go the the game both on and off the field.

Plus he brought Harry and Jimmy together, which are still the best and most honest broadcasters ever.

jdm2662
07-13-2012, 09:22 AM
I was glad he sold the team, too, because he didn't have the money to comptete in the free agent market. Veeck had his faults including the embarrassment of Disco Demolition Night. However, he did many things in his Chicago baseball career and Disco Demolition far from summarizes his legacy. The memory of Disco Demolition is kept alive by many who see it as an historic event, but don't look behind the root causes of the promotion. We can never forget it; no one will let us. But Disco Demolition is the most over-hyped single event in Chicago sports history. Many things that have happened since should over-shadow it. As far as I am concerned it isn't really worth talking about anymore.

The thing is, it's not just an imfamous moment in baseball history. It also affected the music industry in a big way. It made Steve Dahl a superstar, and a lot of Disco artist blame that night for their fall out. So, as bad as that night was from the White Sox/baseball standpoint, it's always going to be brought up.

On another note, I was only 2. My uncle, who is a huge Sox fan, said he was never more embarassed being from Chicago that night. I also remember in 90 when Steve Dahl wrote a song about Comiskey Park. MY father's response was "They actually let him back in the park after what he did!". I guess when you are a season ticket holder, you get to come back to the park. My family wasn't the biggest Dahl fans, either... I was quite pissed when he was brought on to WCKG in 1996. But, that's for another thread.

As for the night itself, well, you have to look at it a different way. Veeck was broke, the Sox stunk, and the team couldn't draw flies. You got to try and do something to get people to the ballpark. Well, maybe that wasn't the best idea, but it did bring lots of new people to the ballpark...

Golden Sox
07-13-2012, 09:36 AM
Maybe the White Sox did stink and Veeck had promotions like Disco Demolition to draw people but I still think he was a bad owner. The one good team he had here was in 1977 with The Southside Hitman and they drew decently. If he would of kept that team together they would of won more games and drew more people and made more money. People seem to forget the fact that after the 1980 season Veeck wanted to move the White Sox to Denver. The American League was against the move and Veeck wound up selling the team to Reinsdorf. If Veeck would of had his way he would of moved the White Sox to Denver where he would of been the owner.

DumpJerry
07-13-2012, 09:50 AM
Well, Veeck did raise ticket prices 50% on us.



When he bought the team, General Admission was $2.00. After a couple of years it $3.00. We stopped going to games at that point. How dare he gouge us for so much money?

WhiteSox5187
07-13-2012, 01:11 PM
Maybe the White Sox did stink and Veeck had promotions like Disco Demolition to draw people but I still think he was a bad owner. The one good team he had here was in 1977 with The Southside Hitman and they drew decently. If he would of kept that team together they would of won more games and drew more people and made more money. People seem to forget the fact that after the 1980 season Veeck wanted to move the White Sox to Denver. The American League was against the move and Veeck wound up selling the team to Reinsdorf. If Veeck would of had his way he would of moved the White Sox to Denver where he would of been the owner.

He couldn't because of free agency. I just finished reading a book on Bill Veeck and they talked about the '77 season and Veeck told Oscar Gamble and Richie Zisk that the best he could offer them was $100,000 a year. Zisk considered it but then Texas offered him 3 times as much and the Padres offered Gamble even more than that who didn't have much interest in stay in Chicago anyways.

SBSoxFan
07-14-2012, 12:53 AM
The thing is, it's not just an imfamous moment in baseball history. It also affected the music industry in a big way. It made Steve Dahl a superstar, and a lot of Disco artist blame that night for their fall out. So, as bad as that night was from the White Sox/baseball standpoint, it's always going to be brought up.

On another note, I was only 2. My uncle, who is a huge Sox fan, said he was never more embarassed being from Chicago that night. I also remember in 90 when Steve Dahl wrote a song about Comiskey Park. MY father's response was "They actually let him back in the park after what he did!". I guess when you are a season ticket holder, you get to come back to the park. My family wasn't the biggest Dahl fans, either... I was quite pissed when he was brought on to WCKG in 1996. But, that's for another thread.

As for the night itself, well, you have to look at it a different way. Veeck was broke, the Sox stunk, and the team couldn't draw flies. You got to try and do something to get people to the ballpark. Well, maybe that wasn't the best idea, but it did bring lots of new people to the ballpark...

Veeck should have tried dynamic pricing instead.

Golden Sox
07-14-2012, 08:45 AM
He did try Dynamic Ticket Pricing. The one good White Sox team he had was in 1977. When the team started to draw in the middle of summer, Veeck raised the ticket prices and said the extra cost was for the additional ushering the park needed to handle the bigger crowds.

white sox bill
07-14-2012, 09:09 AM
I remember getting mt RAD (rockers against disco) card and getting discounts at bars, record stores etc. I cant say I disliked every disco artist, just most of them. Now I kinda like them

This event was on Fox news on the anniversary date, I liked the part where the scoreboard flashed "Please return to your seats" was funny.