PDA

View Full Version : Allen Press Conference


Lip Man 1
06-10-2012, 09:36 PM
Dick arrived in Chicago tonight according to Dr. Fletcher of the Chicago Baseball Museum and will be holding a press conference tomorrow to talk about the upcoming 72 reunion. Doc also told me that Chicago Tribune Live! tomorrow will be having something on the show about this.

It sounds like they are going to interview Dick and maybe Dr. Fletcher.

Just a heads up. They might have some historical footage involved you never know.

Lip

DickAllen72
06-10-2012, 10:55 PM
Thanks for the heads up, Lip!

Lip Man 1
06-11-2012, 07:28 PM
Story on Allen press conference this afternoon:

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/13123722-419/dick-allen-remembers-1972-team-that-saved-white-sox.html

Now there are some errors in it (I've already sent Toni the correct info...)

The Sox did not lose six straight to open the 72 season. They lost the first three in K.C. all by one run, two in extra innings. They then won seven straight.

The Sox did not draw 400,000 in 1971. They drew 833,000. They drew 495,000 in 1970.

The Sox were not rumored to be leaving Chicago in 1972. They were rumored to be leaving in 1968 / 1969 to Milwaukee before the Pilots were moved there. In those seasons the Sox played eight to 10 "home" games at County Stadium as owner Art Allyn was testing the market.

Outside of those inaccuracies, it was a nice story and Dick sounds like he thrilled to be back and be honored.

Lip

TommyJohn
06-11-2012, 07:54 PM
Story on Allen press conference this afternoon:

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/13123722-419/dick-allen-remembers-1972-team-that-saved-white-sox.html

Now there are some errors in it (I've already sent Toni the correct info...)

The Sox did not lose six straight to open the 72 season. They lost the first three in K.C. all by one run, two in extra innings. They then won seven straight.

The Sox did not draw 400,000 in 1971. They drew 833,000. They drew 495,000 in 1970.

The Sox were not rumored to be leaving Chicago in 1972. They were rumored to be leaving in 1968 / 1969 to Milwaukee before the Pilots were moved there. In those seasons the Sox played eight to 10 "home" games at County Stadium as owner Art Allyn was testing the market.

Outside of those inaccuracies, it was a nice story and Dick sounds like he thrilled to be back and be honored.

Lip

What the hell? How is it that a reporter had that many errors? Don't they fact-check these things? Geez!

Harry Potter
06-11-2012, 07:56 PM
What the hell? How is it that a reporter had that many errors? Don't they fact-check these things? Geez!

Can't say I'm surprised based on the stellar reporting from the Suntimes and Tribune these days

jdm2662
06-11-2012, 09:15 PM
What the hell? How is it that a reporter had that many errors? Don't they fact-check these things? Geez!

Rick Telendar published a book about the 85 Bears in 2005 and re-published in 2010. I only read it because my sister bought it for me. I lost count on how many errors there were. Hell, there was one on the very first page. And, hes lived a career of living behind their practice field.

In this day and age with unlimited info available by clicking on a single button, there is no excuse of publishing inaccurate info.

Lip Man 1
06-11-2012, 09:17 PM
Just watched the tape of the Allen interview on Chicago Tribune Live! and thought it went pretty well. Dick showed a humorous side that I didn't know he had. (It might be available at the CSN-Chicago web site or you can watch again tonight when they replay the show...)

Kaplan (of course) knew very little about the facts surrounding Dick's days with the Sox and didn't ask him about any of his 72 signature moments (pinch hit home run off Lyle, two inside the park home runs in the same game at Minnesota or his bleacher shot home run).

I'm not trying to be to critical but I didn't understand Comcast Sports Chicago NOT running ANY TV highlights of Dick with the Sox. They showed Melton, May, Brian Downing, Buddy Bradford, Jerry Hairston, George Orta but no Dick. (And the TV highlights they did show I don't think were from from 72 by the way...Downing wasn't with the Sox in 72, neither was Hairston and Billy North wasn't with Oakland at that time.)

I know there is TV material on Dick from different sources...don't get why Comcast didn't ask to use them. The Chicago Baseball Museum has put together a lot that will be shown that Monday night at the celebration dinner.

It was nice to see the video they did show however, was surprised it still existed. I wonder where it came from?

Lip

DumpJerry
06-11-2012, 09:21 PM
When I was at the game yesterday (Sunday), every time a Sox batter came up I thought he was Dick Allen. Something about those unis......:D:

Lip Man 1
06-11-2012, 09:31 PM
Dump:

They were sweet.

Tribune story on the press conference (better story than the Sun-Times):

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/ct-spt-0612-white-sox-allen--20120612,0,3347884.story

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/ct-spt-0612-white-sox-allen--20120612-001,0,4206443.photo

Lip

DumpJerry
06-11-2012, 09:40 PM
Dump:

They were sweet.

Tribune story on the press conference (better story than the Sun-Times):

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/ct-spt-0612-white-sox-allen--20120612,0,3347884.story

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/ct-spt-0612-white-sox-allen--20120612-001,0,4206443.photo

Lip
I was a 9 year old in 1971. That is when my dad said I was ready for a real baseball team and stopped taking me to the Cubs. When he took me to my first game, my only experience with MLB was a handful of Cub games in the late 60's. I thought it was very similar to a Cub game. Then Ed Hermann went yard......:D: Sold! My dad always said that it was Ritchie Allen (as I called him) who turned me from being a general baseball fan to a Sox fan (I used to say his name all the time when watching the Sox. Wilbur Wood was also a favorite of mine).

Harry Potter
06-11-2012, 11:21 PM
When I was at the game yesterday (Sunday), every time a Sox batter came up I thought he was Dick Allen. Something about those unis......:D:

I love the 1972 throwbacks. I purchased an authentic #15 red uni from Grandstand a few weeks back. I love when people ask why I bought a Gordon Beckham jersey and their looks of confusion when I say because the 1972 AL MVP Dick Allen wore #15 :cool:

Lip Man 1
06-11-2012, 11:46 PM
Dan Roan had a very nice segment on the WGN news tonight from Dick's press conference and they even used footage of Dick... his 1974 All Star single and his home run at K.C. in September 1972.

Comcast Sports Chicago, amazingly though like at 6:30, didn't have a damn thing in the segment from 10-10:30....but they did have three minutes of time for that idiot David Kaplan driving a drag racer.

:rolleyes: :?: :o: :mad:

Lip

TommyJohn
06-12-2012, 02:24 AM
Rick Telendar published a book about the 85 Bears in 2005 and re-published in 2010. I only read it because my sister bought it for me. I lost count on how many errors there were. Hell, there was one on the very first page. And, hes lived a career of living behind their practice field.

In this day and age with unlimited info available by clicking on a single button, there is no excuse of publishing inaccurate info.

Dan McNeil's book of Chicago Sports Lists had a huge error-saying that Paul Konerko and Scott Podsednik's World Series home runs came in game 1.

roylestillman
06-12-2012, 08:00 AM
Dan Roan had a very nice segment on the WGN news tonight from Dick's press conference and they even used footage of Dick... his 1974 All Star single and his home run at K.C. in September 1972.

Comcast Sports Chicago, amazingly though like at 6:30, didn't have a damn thing in the segment from 10-10:30....but they did have three minutes of time for that idiot David Kaplan driving

Lip
Lip

I've always been curious as to why Comcast and in particular Chicago Tribune Live covers "motor sports" on such a regular basis. They seem to have a regulary scheduled segment every week with Chicagoland Speedway. Is this some kind of paid arrangement with Comcast and if so don't they have to say so?

russ99
06-12-2012, 08:24 AM
I love the 1972 throwbacks. I purchased an authentic #15 red uni from Grandstand a few weeks back. I love when people ask why I bought a Gordon Beckham jersey and their looks of confusion when I say because the 1972 AL MVP Dick Allen wore #15 :cool:

Those are sweet. The authentics are so much better than the throwbacks used this year. Love the zipper.

I had a taco at the ballpark on Sunday in honor of the 40th anniversary (a week late) of the infamous Taco Game. :gulp:

I hope someone asks Dick about that this week to get his side of the story.

DumpJerry
06-12-2012, 08:27 AM
Those are sweet. The authentics are so much better than the throwbacks used this year. Love the zipper.

I had a taco at the ballpark on Sunday in honor of the 30th anniversary (a week late) of the infamous Taco Game. :gulp:

I hope someone asks Dick about that this week to get his side of the story.
It's in one of the links above from Lip. Turns out, it was a chili dog.

soxgirl617
06-12-2012, 08:44 AM
Dan McNeil's book of Chicago Sports Lists had a huge error-saying that Paul Konerko and Scott Podsednik's World Series home runs came in game 1.

Wow, that's nothing short of shocking. I don't work in journalism/media/publishing, but doesn't anyone have editors and/or fact checkers anymore? (Serious question, by the way.)

I enjoyed the little bit of the Allen press conference that I saw. I don't remember him really well, although of course I knew who he was (even at the time). It's nice to learn more about Allen and the 1972 Sox.

BainesHOF
06-12-2012, 09:53 AM
David Kaplan is the biggest hack in Chicago sports media. Really, how does he have a job?

DonnieDarko
06-12-2012, 10:32 AM
David Kaplan is the biggest hack in Chicago sports media. Really, how does he have a job?

Probably because he's a huge hack.

Lip Man 1
06-12-2012, 12:28 PM
Another good story:

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/13127747-419/after-38-years-white-sox-savior-dick-allen-finally-gets-his-due.html

Lip

gobears1987
06-12-2012, 12:40 PM
Dan McNeil's book of Chicago Sports Lists had a huge error-saying that Paul Konerko and Scott Podsednik's World Series home runs came in game 1.

He was probably drunk, high, or too busy losing money at the boats when he wrote that book.

MeteorsSox4367
06-12-2012, 12:40 PM
When I was at the game yesterday (Sunday), every time a Sox batter came up I thought he was Dick Allen. Something about those unis......:D:

Yep. I think the reason why I like them so much is those are the first unis I remember the Sox wearing when my Dad got me hooked on baseball and his favorite team.

I saw a cool picture from the '73 All-Star Game in KC with all the AL players and coaches lined up along the first-base line. You could see Chuck Tanner in his red pinstripes along with the Sox representative, outfielder Pat Kelly.

Or as my Dad loved to call him, "Double Play Ball" Kelly.:D:

DrCrawdad
06-12-2012, 12:50 PM
When is Allen being honored at a Sox game? Is he throwing out the first pitch?

FielderJones
06-12-2012, 01:02 PM
When is Allen being honored at a Sox game? Is he throwing out the first pitch?

June 24 (http://chicago.whitesox.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20120611&content_id=33144028&vkey=news_cws&c_id=cws)

TDog
06-12-2012, 02:48 PM
Wow, that's nothing short of shocking. I don't work in journalism/media/publishing, but doesn't anyone have editors and/or fact checkers anymore? (Serious question, by the way.)
...

It deserves a serious answer. Newspaper don't employ fact checkers. I don't know of any newspaper that employs a fact checker and don't know of anyone that ever did. Magazines do. Even when I have been commissioned to write for a magazine, rather than approaching the publishers with a story idea, the article is submitted with contact information for all of your sources. This is expected in the industry. Magazines have fact checkers who do nothing but verify content and quotes in what they publish.

Newspapers are much more immediate. They employ copy editors who are responsible for a story's mechanics and coherence and will question any facts that don't make sense. Newspapers have been cutting back on copy editors to save money. Meanwhile, the many of the most experienced and well-trained reporters are at the point where they just don't care anymore and copy editors don't have the reporting, academic or life experience to be able to pick up on mistakes. When I was copy editing, I prevented columnists the embarrassment of a lot of mistakes, including Napoleon meeting with Abraham Lincoln, the Mayflower landing on Plymouth Rock in 1619 and Benjamin Harrison winning an election over Grover Cleveland Alexander.

Some stories anymore get little more than spell-checked. Compressing, even eliminating deadlines by putting everything directly onto the Internet means less "fact checking." If you want it fast, you often will get things wrong. Newspaper people were complaining for years that that's what television was doing. Now everyone is making a mess of the news.

In the the Dick Allen article, the errors are basic that would scream mistake to any White Sox fan over 50. And they correct facts are easily verified by a couple of media guides. But ultimately, it's the writer's fault because his name is on the story.

wilburaga
06-12-2012, 03:03 PM
It deserves a serious answer. Newspaper don't employ fact checkers. I don't know of any newspaper that employs a fact checker and don't know of anyone that ever did. Magazines do. Even when I have been commissioned to write for a magazine, rather than approaching the publishers with a story idea, the article is submitted with contact information for all of your sources. This is expected in the industry. Magazines have fact checkers who do nothing but verify content and quotes in what they publish.

Newspapers are much more immediate. They employ copy editors who are responsible for a story's mechanics and coherence and will question any facts that don't make sense. Newspapers have been cutting back on copy editors to save money. Meanwhile, the many of the most experienced and well-trained reporters are at the point where they just don't care anymore and copy editors don't have the reporting, academic or life experience to be able to pick up on mistakes. When I was copy editing, I prevented columnists the embarrassment of a lot of mistakes, including Napoleon meeting with Abraham Lincoln, the Mayflower landing on Plymouth Rock in 1619 and Benjamin Harrison winning an election over Grover Cleveland Alexander.

Some stories anymore get little more than spell-checked. Compressing, even eliminating deadlines by putting everything directly onto the Internet means less "fact checking." If you want it fast, you often will get things wrong. Newspaper people were complaining for years that that's what television was doing. Now everyone is making a mess of the news.

In the the Dick Allen article, the errors are basic that would scream mistake to any White Sox fan over 50. And they correct facts are easily verified by a couple of media guides. But ultimately, it's the writer's fault because his name is on the story.

Here's a quote from yesterday's NY Times in a story about two Auburn football players.

"But both players' football hopes were dampened, their dreams deflated. Late Saturday, both were shot and killed, along with another man, after a fight during a pool party two miles south of campus."

The imbecility imbedded in those remarks is stunning. Yes, I guess it's normal to be down in the dumps, a little off your feed, after you've been shot and killed. How about crushed and obliterated instead of dampened and deflated?

SI1020
06-12-2012, 03:23 PM
The worst part of it all is that most people don't even know that the mistakes are mistakes.

soxgirl617
06-12-2012, 05:47 PM
I appreciate the explanation, TDog--thanks. I've noticed that Internet versions of newspapers tend to be especially prone to grammatical and clerical mistakes, including partial sentences. (I'm particularly looking at you, Chicago Tribune.) I figure that's the result of the "rush" of the Internet version. I don't like it, but I find it more understandable than factual mistakes in a book or magazine. I would lose my job, literally, if I repeatedly made the kind of factual mistakes I see in books and magazines.

Lip Man 1
06-12-2012, 06:47 PM
Remember it's not important to be accurate anymore...it's more important to be first!

:o:

Lip

Golden Sox
06-12-2012, 07:07 PM
I have mixed emotions about Dick Allen. The White Sox have had 2 great hitters in my lifetime, Dick Allen and Frank Thomas. I think it's crazy that Santo is in the HOF and Dick Allen isn't. But I still can't forget how Allen quit the team in September 1974. After he quit on the White Sox, he then said that off season, he didn't quit and wanted to come back to Chicago in 1975. The White Sox then traded him. I've met him and he rubbed me as if he doesn't even like baseball. To my knowledge he doesn't watch or attend baseball games. I was always under the impression he preferred horse racing to baseball.

Wedema
06-12-2012, 07:44 PM
All of the articles talk about Dick reuniting with the Sox for the first time in 40 years, but I met him at Sox Fest in the early 90's at the Hyatt. He signed autographs for one session in the Grand Ballroom that year.

Brian26
06-12-2012, 08:21 PM
I've met him and he rubbed me as if he doesn't even like baseball. To my knowledge he doesn't watch or attend baseball games.

This is not unusual, and it is nothing I would ever consider holding against him. I read and hear many stories about former athletes (and musicians, and politicians, etc) who are involved at an early age in one profession and then get out of it.

Tony Kubek played baseball for quite awhile and then was a decent national broadcaster. When he got out of baseball in the late 80s after the NBC contract ended, he left and never came back. The game changed after the '94 strike, and he said didn't like where it was going. Jim Leyland was interviewed the other night on the Costas show on MLB Network. Leyland said Jeff King was one of the most talented guys he ever managed, but he didn't think King enjoyed the game at all.

I was listening to a podcast a few months ago from a New York show that was interviewing Jack McDowell. The interviewer was asking McDowell questions about his early years with the Sox, and Jack was answering with incorrect dates and mixing up facts. I was listening and thinking "how did you get that wrong", but the bottom line is that most players aren't as passionate about the sport like fans are. Baseball is a hobby or fun diversion for us, but for the players - usually it is a job, and probably a pretty stressful one at that.

Noneck
06-12-2012, 08:58 PM
I I've met him and he rubbed me as if he doesn't even like baseball. To my knowledge he doesn't watch or attend baseball games. I was always under the impression he preferred horse racing to baseball.

I know that I will never go back to where I worked, it was a job to me. Yes its hard to imagine that playing a game would be considered a job but to some it is.

I follow horse racing and have not heard of Allen being involved in the sport for quite some time. Maybe someone will find out what he does now, with his time.

Lip Man 1
06-12-2012, 11:42 PM
Noneck:

Dick still follows the ponies.

Golden:

From my interview with Chuck Tanner:

ML: In September 1974 Allen ‘retired’ from the Sox in mid September. From what I understand it was pretty emotional in the clubhouse when he spoke with the team. Did you know that Dick was planning on leaving? Did you try to talk him out of it?

CT: “No, I’d never try to talk a player out of something like that and no I didn’t know ahead of time he was leaving. He just came into my office with his spikes tied together and hung over his shoulder like you used to do as a kid and said, ‘Lefty, that’s it, I’m done.’ I told him that I appreciated how hard he played for me and that I thought he had the greatest year anyone that I managed, ever had. I knew he was really hurting. Dick had a very bad shoulder, he was coming off that broken leg (Author’s Note: Suffered in June 1973 in Anaheim) and he was tired. He was just tired of dealing with things like the media. There were a number of games where he shouldn’t even have been playing but he was out there anyway.”

ML: Dick was a tremendous player but one who may have gotten an unfair rap. Craig Wright who worked for the Rangers when Dick was coaching with that organization in the 80's did a lengthy piece for SABR Magazine. He gave White Sox Interactive permission to reprint it, both you and Roland are quoted extensively in the story. You said that “Dick was the greatest player I ever managed and what he did in Chicago was amazing.” You also were very, very supportive of Dick in the story when it was brought to your attention that Bill James, the statistical guy, said he was a “disruptive presence” on a team. Again your reply was “he's full of ****, and you be sure to tell him that." What kind of person was Dick in relationship to his teammates? In Wright’s story everyone that played with Allen said he was a great guy and a leader.

CT: “He was the leader of the team. He taught the kids how to play the game. They loved him, they listened to him. He was the best player I ever had and he should be in the Hall Of Fame. I can’t say enough about the things he did for me and for the team. If ever I got back into managing, I was going to call Dick and ask him to be one of my coaches. He understood the game and the way it’s supposed to be played.”

And yes Dick was back in Chicago in the mid 90's when he was honored by SportsChannel-Chicago (Fox Sports Chicago) as one of the 'legends' of the city.

Lip

Noneck
06-12-2012, 11:54 PM
Lip,

Is he involved in ownership or training ?

Lip Man 1
06-13-2012, 12:06 AM
Not that I know of. He justs likes to go to the track.

Lip

Noneck
06-13-2012, 12:14 AM
Not that I know of. He justs likes to go to the track.

Lip

Nothing wrong with that.

Nellie_Fox
06-13-2012, 01:30 AM
He and his brother Hank were both involved in the business side of horse racing at one time. When I worked security at the Kentucky Derby in 1989, I talked to Hank, who was training one of the horses in the race.

Dan H
06-14-2012, 07:26 AM
I have mixed emotions about Dick Allen. The White Sox have had 2 great hitters in my lifetime, Dick Allen and Frank Thomas. I think it's crazy that Santo is in the HOF and Dick Allen isn't. But I still can't forget how Allen quit the team in September 1974. After he quit on the White Sox, he then said that off season, he didn't quit and wanted to come back to Chicago in 1975. The White Sox then traded him. I've met him and he rubbed me as if he doesn't even like baseball. To my knowledge he doesn't watch or attend baseball games. I was always under the impression he preferred horse racing to baseball.

I have mixed emotions as well. Many of my generation remember his ninth inning homer to beat the Yanks in second game of a doubleheader in early June '72. But that was bat day and over 51,000 were attendance and Allen wasn't in the starting lineup in the second game. A year later in mid-May when there 55,555 there for another bat day doubleheader, Allen was not in the starting lineup again for game two. Showed how much he cared.

And leaving before the season ended in in 1974? That was gutless and there is no other way of putting it.

I still haven't seen anyone hit home runs like Dick Allen. But I hated those disappearing acts. Sox players said he was a good teammate, yet he gave the impression he wished he could be someplace else.

Lip Man 1
06-14-2012, 12:27 PM
Dan:

For the record Dick was held out of the June 4, 1972 2nd game against the Yankees by manager Chuck Tanner. Dick had played every inning of every game before that and Chuck said he wanted to rest him.

Chuck also said between games to the reporters that, "we'll have Dick come off the bench and pinch hit a home run..." :tongue:

Regarding Dick leaving, all I can suggest is for you to read what I posted earlier in the thread about Chuck's comments on the day he left and why he left.

Lip

LITTLE NELL
06-14-2012, 01:38 PM
I have mixed emotions about Dick Allen. The White Sox have had 2 great hitters in my lifetime, Dick Allen and Frank Thomas. I think it's crazy that Santo is in the HOF and Dick Allen isn't. But I still can't forget how Allen quit the team in September 1974. After he quit on the White Sox, he then said that off season, he didn't quit and wanted to come back to Chicago in 1975. The White Sox then traded him. I've met him and he rubbed me as if he doesn't even like baseball. To my knowledge he doesn't watch or attend baseball games. I was always under the impression he preferred horse racing to baseball.

I also have mixed feelings about Allen. He did have one of the greatest seasons a White Sox player ever had and he was so strong, I swear that he hit a line drive home run one day that the opposing shortstop leaped for.
He could have owned Chicago but he quit on us.
I'm also not going to give him full credit for saving the franchise, that 1971 season when the team improved by 23 games and attendance just about doubled with the Tanner-Hemond regime leading the way is so much overlooked. That season brought respectability back to Comiskey Park. And then there was a another guy who came aboard by the name of Harry Caray who made every game sound like it was the 7th game of the World Series, he as much as anyone brought interest back to baseball on the Southside.

Noneck
06-14-2012, 02:53 PM
And then there was a another guy who came aboard by the name of Harry Caray who made every game sound like it was the 7th game of the World Series, he as much as anyone brought interest back to baseball on the Southside.

I do agree with you but Harrys forte was making the game fun to watch and listen to. Many seasons there is no way he could make games sound like the 7th game of the world series but he made them amusing to listen to. He was a great announcer but also was a great entertainer.

LITTLE NELL
06-14-2012, 03:14 PM
I do agree with you but Harrys forte was making the game fun to watch and listen to. Many seasons there is no way he could make games sound like the 7th game of the world series but he made them amusing to listen to. He was a great announcer but also was a great entertainer.

Aaah, you can't beat fun at the old ballpark!!. There goes Miss Chicago walking by.

Lip Man 1
06-14-2012, 03:20 PM
Nell:

I agree with you it wasn't only Dick, it was the entire team and the desperate circumstances the franchise was in at the time.

Also I agree on the improvement by the 1971 club, thanks to the deals made by Roland and Chuck, however they still finished with a losing record and didn't post a winning one nor become a real contender until Dick and Stan came along.

They should have won in 73 save for the idiot Stu Holcomb who ordered Hemond to release any player who wouldn't take his contact offer. (The Sox lost Reichardt, Spiezio, Andrews and Johnstone because of this) When Holcomb ordered Roland to release Bahnsen, Hemond and Tanner went to John Allyn and said, "it's him or us..."

Allen told Holcomb "he gone" but by then the damage was done. When the injuries hit the Sox had no depth and the clubhouse was torn asunder.

Lip

LITTLE NELL
06-14-2012, 03:40 PM
Nell:

I agree with you it wasn't only Dick, it was the entire team and the desperate circumstances the franchise was in at the time.

Also I agree on the improvement by the 1971 club, thanks to the deals made by Roland and Chuck, however they still finished with a losing record and didn't post a winning one nor become a real contender until Dick and Stan came along.

They should have won in 73 save for the idiot Stu Holcomb who ordered Hemond to release any player who wouldn't take his contact offer. (The Sox lost Reichardt, Spiezio, Andrews and Johnstone because of this) When Holcomb ordered Roland to release Bahnsen, Hemond and Tanner went to John Allyn and said, "it's him or us..."

Allen told Holcomb "he gone" but by then the damage was done. When the injuries hit the Sox had no depth and the clubhouse was torn asunder.

Lip
Yeah, they went 79-83 but after 68, 69 and 70 it felt to me like we won the division.

DickAllen72
06-14-2012, 05:42 PM
He did have one of the greatest seasons a White Sox player ever had and he was so strong, I swear that he hit a line drive home run one day that the opposing shortstop leaped for.

I remember that. I was at a game, I believe it was a Sunday afternoon game, when that happened.

TomBradley72
06-14-2012, 06:53 PM
Yeah, they went 79-83 but after 68, 69 and 70 it felt to me like we won the division.

I was 8 years old for the 1971 season- and was initially a Cubs fan- but I started to see how winning wasn't really the priority, that Jack Brickhouse was spewing propaganda regardless of what was on the field, etc. I actually remember thinking this stuff at that age-

At the same time Harry Caray showed up, my Dad got 2 tix to a night game- so I went to my first game at Comiskey Park, and first game under the lights- Carlos May hit a homer off the upper deck facade in right field, the scoreboard exploded and the crowd was much more 'raucous" than at Wrigley- I was hooked.

I struggled to find them on the small FM station that broadcast them, I could barely see the games through the "snow" on Channel 32- but their fight to try to get to .500 late in the season felt like we were in the pennant race. They played hard, the red uniforms were cool, and Chuck Tanner brought a very unique personality to his role compared to his peers, and Harry Caray was about as far from Brickhouse as you could get.

But it was the acquisition and performance of Dick Allen that pushed them over the hump to legitimate contender in 1972, drove another huge increase in attendance as well as some national attention (i.e. SI cover).

Holcomb and injuries killed us in 1973- that was the year they were pretty loaded up- and losing Bradley left a bigger hole in the starting rotation than expected.

Dan H
06-15-2012, 05:59 AM
Dan:

For the record Dick was held out of the June 4, 1972 2nd game against the Yankees by manager Chuck Tanner. Dick had played every inning of every game before that and Chuck said he wanted to rest him.

Chuck also said between games to the reporters that, "we'll have Dick come off the bench and pinch hit a home run..." :tongue:

Regarding Dick leaving, all I can suggest is for you to read what I posted earlier in the thread about Chuck's comments on the day he left and why he left.

Lip

I know. Chuck was always explaining things away. I do know about all the explanations Allen gave in interviews or had written in his book, Crash. One was that he really wanted to retire, then he wanted to go to Japan and then he changed his mind and wanted to come back to the White Sox. I've heard everything.

About him getting a rest: There was a better time to do that than when there is a capacity crowd at ball park. Not to mention he sat out the second game during another big crowd in the next season.

Allen was the most talented player I saw play in a White Sox uniform. The amazing thing is that he could have been even better. I still haven't seen a player have a better year and I don't care what stats they have. But the fact remains that Dick Allen was not with team on the last day of the season for three years he was with the Sox. I bet that is something that he even regrets.

Lip Man 1
06-21-2012, 01:42 AM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/videogallery/70578238/Sports/Video-Bill-Melton-talks-about-Dick-Allen-and-72-Sox

Lip

TomBradley72
06-23-2012, 04:28 PM
Anyone else going to the tribute/charity dinner on Monday night?

Just got my ticket-