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View Full Version : Is WBEZ irresponsibly stereotyping Cubs fans?


Fenway
08-24-2011, 12:58 PM
http://www.chicagonow.com/chillini/2011/08/is-wbez-irresponsibly-stereotyping-cubs-fans/

SOXPHILE
08-24-2011, 01:30 PM
Nope. Not in the least. This portrayal hits pretty close to home for the "Cubs Game Fans", and that's too bad, isn't it ?

I've always been a Sox fan, but I didn't always hate the Cubs. I went to both Wrigley and Comiskey starting in the mid-70's. I watched and witnessed first hand, the transformation at Wrigley and the surrounding area. It went from attracting 8-10K (maybe) on a bright sunny summer day to watch a bad ballclub, to, starting in 1984, the place to be, packed to the gills, mainly by people portrayed here. Loud, stupid, obnoxious, oblivious, with little to no idea or understanding about the game on the field, the Cubs, the game of baseball itself.

Coincidentally, that was exactly when I started hating the Cubs and Cubs fans. The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North". It was nothing but a party atmosphere from there on out. Plus, the media bought into it and fed it, helping get even bigger still. There were still the actual, real Cubs fans there, but I say easily 60-70% of it was tourists, fratboys and sorority girls with their beads, yuppies, etc. Even now, 27 years later, it's still the same. It's at different levels, depending how good or awful the team is, but it's still there. No other team in any of the four pro leagues is like this. No other park, stadium or arena is an end destination for idiots like this. Yes, there are drunken, stupid morons at every game in every sport who don't know **** about the team they profess to be fans of or the game they play. But nowhere is the stadium where the game is played and the surrounding area the end destination like Wrigley and the party there. At all the other places, most of the people go to watch the game. Whatever party and drunken stupidity that go along with it are extracurricular, a bonus for those interested. At Wrigley, it's the other way around.

g0g0
08-24-2011, 01:34 PM
No more than any other idiot stereotype. Jay Leno proved that you could find an idiot anywhere you go with his sidewalk interviews. But those way more scary lol.

kittle42
08-24-2011, 01:58 PM
No more than any other idiot stereotype. Jay Leno proved that you could find an idiot anywhere you go with his sidewalk interviews. But those way more scary lol.

How true. People are frightening.

Whitesox029
08-24-2011, 02:26 PM
This man is doing the work of the proverbial baseball gods. Whenever a Cubs fan tries to rope me into the dumbass attendance argument I point out that things were a lot different back in about '82.
I went to Turtle's (Turtles'?) on 31st st. before a game last week. It was the antithesis of Wrigleyville, and I loved it.

DeadMoney
08-24-2011, 08:57 PM
There were still the actual, real Cubs fans there, but I say easily 60-70% of it was tourists, fratboys and sorority girls with their beads, yuppies, etc. Even now, 27 years later, it's still the same. It's at different levels, depending how good or awful the team is, but it's still there. No other team in any of the four pro leagues is like this. No other park, stadium or arena is an end destination for idiots like this. Yes, there are drunken, stupid morons at every game in every sport who don't know **** about the team they profess to be fans of or the game they play. But nowhere is the stadium where the game is played and the surrounding area the end destination like Wrigley and the party there. At all the other places, most of the people go to watch the game. Whatever party and drunken stupidity that go along with it are extracurricular, a bonus for those interested. At Wrigley, it's the other way around.

I just moved to Wrigleyville for this very reason. I'm 24, I'm single, and I have the ability to live up in an area that's a lot of fun. I probably won't go to many (if any) Cubs games, but I wanted to be part of that atmosphere (and quite honestly, still may not want to let go of the 'College lifestyle'). I travel during the week, so when I'm home on weekends I want to relax, have fun, and party with my friends (many of whom live up there). I imagine my reasons for living up there aren't far from the norm.

As for stereotyping Cubs fans, I happen to think that it's both fair and unfair. I don't pretend to be a Cubs fan, nor do I plan on going to games. But, for the people who are still stuck in the frat boy or sorority girl mentality, go to games, and openly describe themselves as Cubs fans... Those people deserve the stereotype. It's absolutely not a stereotype that blankets the entire fan base though. The Cubs have good fans, it's just that the crowd that describes themselves as fans (and act like they're at a college football pre-game tailgate when they're up there) are more obnoxious and more noticeable to outsiders.

Harry Potter
08-24-2011, 09:42 PM
I just moved to Wrigleyville for this very reason. I'm 24, I'm single, and I have the ability to live up in an area that's a lot of fun. I probably won't go to many (if any) Cubs games, but I wanted to be part of that atmosphere (and quite honestly, still may not want to let go of the 'College lifestyle'). I travel during the week, so when I'm home on weekends I want to relax, have fun, and party with my friends (many of whom live up there). I imagine my reasons for living up there aren't far from the norm.

As for stereotyping Cubs fans, I happen to think that it's both fair and unfair. I don't pretend to be a Cubs fan, nor do I plan on going to games. But, for the people who are still stuck in the frat boy or sorority girl mentality, go to games, and openly describe themselves as Cubs fans... Those people deserve the stereotype. It's absolutely not a stereotype that blankets the entire fan base though. The Cubs have good fans, it's just that the crowd that describes themselves as fans (and act like they're at a college football pre-game tailgate when they're up there) are more obnoxious and more noticeable to outsiders.

+1

Well said kid...

tebman
08-24-2011, 10:05 PM
I've always been a Sox fan, but I didn't always hate the Cubs. I went to both Wrigley and Comiskey starting in the mid-70's. I watched and witnessed first hand, the transformation at Wrigley and the surrounding area. It went from attracting 8-10K (maybe) on a bright sunny summer day to watch a bad ballclub, to, starting in 1984, the place to be, packed to the gills, mainly by people portrayed here. Loud, stupid, obnoxious, oblivious, with little to no idea or understanding about the game on the field, the Cubs, the game of baseball itself.

Coincidentally, that was exactly when I started hating the Cubs and Cubs fans. The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North". It was nothing but a party atmosphere from there on out. Plus, the media bought into it and fed it, helping get even bigger still. There were still the actual, real Cubs fans there, but I say easily 60-70% of it was tourists, fratboys and sorority girls with their beads, yuppies, etc. Even now, 27 years later, it's still the same. It's at different levels, depending how good or awful the team is, but it's still there. No other team in any of the four pro leagues is like this. No other park, stadium or arena is an end destination for idiots like this. Yes, there are drunken, stupid morons at every game in every sport who don't know **** about the team they profess to be fans of or the game they play. But nowhere is the stadium where the game is played and the surrounding area the end destination like Wrigley and the party there. At all the other places, most of the people go to watch the game. Whatever party and drunken stupidity that go along with it are extracurricular, a bonus for those interested. At Wrigley, it's the other way around.

:thumbsup:

The Tribune bought the Cubs in 1981 because the Cubs' front office was exploring the possibility of joining in Eddie Einhorn's pay-TV scheme. WGN radio and WGN-TV would lose hundreds of hours of profitable progam material if that happened. The Tribune bosses also knew that Bill Wrigley had an inheritance tax burden after the deaths of his parents (P.K. Wrigley and his wife), and he might be open to selling the team, and that would lock up the Cubs for the radio and TV stations.

A few years later the Tribune fell into a tub of honey when Harry Caray brought his act, the Cubs went to the playoffs, and the previously-sketchy neighborhood around the ballpark gentrified in the mid-'80s. Voilą! A perfect storm that the Tribune's media empire could milk for years. A veritable Disneyland for Chads and Trixies, and a gloss of old-ballpark nostalgia that could be sold to tourists.

I've got a friend I've known for 50 years who's a Cub fan, a baseball fan, and shakes his head over what it's turned into. There's a joke I heard that the seats could be turned around and people would still show up because they have no idea what those men are doing on the grass down there.

SOXPHILE
08-24-2011, 10:46 PM
I just moved to Wrigleyville for this very reason. I'm 24, I'm single, and I have the ability to live up in an area that's a lot of fun. I probably won't go to many (if any) Cubs games, but I wanted to be part of that atmosphere (and quite honestly, still may not want to let go of the 'College lifestyle'). I travel during the week, so when I'm home on weekends I want to relax, have fun, and party with my friends (many of whom live up there). I imagine my reasons for living up there aren't far from the norm.

As for stereotyping Cubs fans, I happen to think that it's both fair and unfair. I don't pretend to be a Cubs fan, nor do I plan on going to games. But, for the people who are still stuck in the frat boy or sorority girl mentality, go to games, and openly describe themselves as Cubs fans... Those people deserve the stereotype. It's absolutely not a stereotype that blankets the entire fan base though. The Cubs have good fans, it's just that the crowd that describes themselves as fans (and act like they're at a college football pre-game tailgate when they're up there) are more obnoxious and more noticeable to outsiders.

Hey, that's fine, I have no problem with that. I was in my 20's once too. I spent many many nights hitting the bars around there in the 90's. Went to quite a few Cubs games too (wearing my Sox hat of course). Unlike many sitting around me though, I actually watched the games, knew what was going on out on the field, etc. What I still can't stand to this day are all the idiots who claim to be Cub fans, act the part, and also have the actual gaul to look down on someone else who is a Sox fan, when they have absolutely no baseball knowledge or acumen, or very little of it, and just act the part, when what they are really fans of is the party. Hence my term "Cubs Game Fans" instead of Cubs fans. There's nothing wrong with having a good time with your friends at the game, but I've always said, for the most part, when I wanted to party and drink and oogle girls, I went to what we call "bars". When I just wanna chill, get a tan and hang out, I go to these things called "beaches" or "pools". When I pay money for a ticket to a ballgame, call me crazy, but I want to watch and follow the baseball game out on the field.

g0g0
08-25-2011, 08:19 AM
An easy way to see if they are a casual fan or a 'real' fan is to ask them what the starting line-up is for the season. If they can name most of the regular starters, then I'm fine with them. If they say Castro or Z and that's all they can name, then I'm done talking to them about baseball. :D:

Ex-Chicagoan
08-25-2011, 08:33 AM
One of the few online pieces I've read in a while where I actually enjoyed the comments more than the article. The headline is misleading: WBEZ put this on a blog, which is not their on-air product. As a commenter explained, if you hold WBEZ accountable, then every post on ChicagoNow is the official position of the Chicago Tribune... and that is a very slippery slope.

RadioheadRocks
08-25-2011, 09:22 PM
Nope. Not in the least. This portrayal hits pretty close to home for the "Cubs Game Fans", and that's too bad, isn't it ?

I've always been a Sox fan, but I didn't always hate the Cubs. I went to both Wrigley and Comiskey starting in the mid-70's. I watched and witnessed first hand, the transformation at Wrigley and the surrounding area. It went from attracting 8-10K (maybe) on a bright sunny summer day to watch a bad ballclub, to, starting in 1984, the place to be, packed to the gills, mainly by people portrayed here. Loud, stupid, obnoxious, oblivious, with little to no idea or understanding about the game on the field, the Cubs, the game of baseball itself.

Coincidentally, that was exactly when I started hating the Cubs and Cubs fans. The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North". It was nothing but a party atmosphere from there on out. Plus, the media bought into it and fed it, helping get even bigger still. There were still the actual, real Cubs fans there, but I say easily 60-70% of it was tourists, fratboys and sorority girls with their beads, yuppies, etc. Even now, 27 years later, it's still the same. It's at different levels, depending how good or awful the team is, but it's still there. No other team in any of the four pro leagues is like this. No other park, stadium or arena is an end destination for idiots like this. Yes, there are drunken, stupid morons at every game in every sport who don't know **** about the team they profess to be fans of or the game they play. But nowhere is the stadium where the game is played and the surrounding area the end destination like Wrigley and the party there. At all the other places, most of the people go to watch the game. Whatever party and drunken stupidity that go along with it are extracurricular, a bonus for those interested. At Wrigley, it's the other way around.


Bingo, you hit it out of the park with this assessment.

LITTLE NELL
08-26-2011, 05:28 AM
Nope. Not in the least. This portrayal hits pretty close to home for the "Cubs Game Fans", and that's too bad, isn't it ?

I've always been a Sox fan, but I didn't always hate the Cubs. I went to both Wrigley and Comiskey starting in the mid-70's. I watched and witnessed first hand, the transformation at Wrigley and the surrounding area. It went from attracting 8-10K (maybe) on a bright sunny summer day to watch a bad ballclub, to, starting in 1984, the place to be, packed to the gills, mainly by people portrayed here. Loud, stupid, obnoxious, oblivious, with little to no idea or understanding about the game on the field, the Cubs, the game of baseball itself.

Coincidentally, that was exactly when I started hating the Cubs and Cubs fans. The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North". It was nothing but a party atmosphere from there on out. Plus, the media bought into it and fed it, helping get even bigger still. There were still the actual, real Cubs fans there, but I say easily 60-70% of it was tourists, fratboys and sorority girls with their beads, yuppies, etc. Even now, 27 years later, it's still the same. It's at different levels, depending how good or awful the team is, but it's still there. No other team in any of the four pro leagues is like this. No other park, stadium or arena is an end destination for idiots like this. Yes, there are drunken, stupid morons at every game in every sport who don't know **** about the team they profess to be fans of or the game they play. But nowhere is the stadium where the game is played and the surrounding area the end destination like Wrigley and the party there. At all the other places, most of the people go to watch the game. Whatever party and drunken stupidity that go along with it are extracurricular, a bonus for those interested. At Wrigley, it's the other way around.

Very good, but even back in the 50s and up to 1967 the Cubs were selling the park more than the team. Back then they were the 2nd team in Chicago and 3,000 would show up on a summer weekday with 10k to 15k for a weekend game. The commercial that I will always remember was a lady calling her girlfriend asking her if she wanted to go to Beautiful Wrigley Field for some sunshine, fresh air and a hot dog and a beer. And then at the end she says that we will even get to see an MLB game. Maybe?

Milw
08-26-2011, 10:50 AM
The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North".
If only Damaso hadn't gotten so fat that year, none of this would have happened. :redneck

kittle42
08-26-2011, 10:50 AM
If only Damaso hadn't gotten so fat that year, none of this would have happened. :redneck

Ha, ha!

slavko
08-26-2011, 04:56 PM
If only Damaso hadn't gotten so fat that year, none of this would have happened. :redneck

This is the Internet. Spelling is optional.

TommyJohn
08-27-2011, 12:14 AM
The novelty of them actually making the playoffs in 1984, plus Harry Carry, all the bars springing up in the area, it all created this perfect storm, what I call "Marte Gras North".

If only Damaso hadn't gotten so fat that year, none of this would have happened. :redneck

I thought maybe Damaso had bought the naming rights to Mardi Gras.