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chisoxfanatic
07-08-2011, 12:10 AM
This team is currently on pace to score 644 runs this season, which would be the most inept offensive output in my entire Sox fandom (I started following this team around '89/'90). Looking at Baseball-Reference, it looks like those teams from the mid-60s through the mid-70s could give this team a run for its money when it comes to offensive sucktitude. The 1968 Sox only scored 463 runs! :o:

How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years? I'm so not used to offensive suckage of this proportion!

Nellie_Fox
07-08-2011, 12:16 AM
This team is currently on pace to score 644 runs this season, which would be the most inept offensive output in my entire Sox fandom (I started following this team around '89/'90). Looking at Baseball-Reference, it looks like those teams from the mid-60s through the mid-70s could give this team a run for its money when it comes to offensive sucktitude. The 1968 Sox only scored 463 runs! :o:

How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years? I'm so not used to offensive suckage of this proportion!1968 was the last year of the 15" high pitcher's mound. The reason they lowered it was because of the pitching domination and paucity of offense. Sox pitching had a team ERA of 2.75

LITTLE NELL
07-08-2011, 05:25 AM
This team is currently on pace to score 644 runs this season, which would be the most inept offensive output in my entire Sox fandom (I started following this team around '89/'90). Looking at Baseball-Reference, it looks like those teams from the mid-60s through the mid-70s could give this team a run for its money when it comes to offensive sucktitude. The 1968 Sox only scored 463 runs! :o:

How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years? I'm so not used to offensive suckage of this proportion!

68-69 and 70 were the low points for me as a Sox fan. It was a pitchers era, in 1968 only one player in the whole American League batted .300 and that was Yaz at .301. As for the Sox they just fell apart after the great run at in 67, great pitching and defense but no regular batted over .241. I guess after 17 straight winning seasons the franchise was due for some bad times and we sure got them. Thank God for Roland Hemond, Chuck Tanner and Dick Allen for bringing us back to a contender by 1972.

LITTLE NELL
07-08-2011, 05:30 AM
1968 was the last year of the 15" high pitcher's mound. The reason they lowered it was because of the pitching domination and paucity of offense. Sox pitching had a team ERA of 2.75


And in 67 when we almost won it, the Sox had the best ERA in MLB at 2.45.

Dan H
07-08-2011, 05:35 AM
This team is currently on pace to score 644 runs this season, which would be the most inept offensive output in my entire Sox fandom (I started following this team around '89/'90). Looking at Baseball-Reference, it looks like those teams from the mid-60s through the mid-70s could give this team a run for its money when it comes to offensive sucktitude. The 1968 Sox only scored 463 runs! :o:

How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years? I'm so not used to offensive suckage of this proportion!

Many tuned out. Attendance sank to 495,000 in 1970. I was at games when there were about 3,000 fans in the stadium. They had a couple of "crowds" of just over 600. When Bill Melton became the first White Sox player to hit 30 homers in a season, there was about 650 people in the stands. The franchise was falling apart.

LITTLE NELL
07-08-2011, 05:50 AM
Many tuned out. Attendance sank to 495,000 in 1970. I was at games when there were about 3,000 fans in the stadium. They had a couple of "crowds" of just over 600. When Bill Melton became the first White Sox player to hit 30 homers in a season, there was about 650 people in the stands. The franchise was falling apart.

What made it worse was that the Cubs for the first time in years were contenders. In 69 and 70 if you were a Sox fan it was like you had a disease. Besides 68 when I was in Viet Nam, 1970 is the only year I never went to a game at Comiskey since my first game in 1955.

DumpJerry
07-08-2011, 07:24 AM
This is why us "old timers" laugh at the young ones who want to jump ship because the current team has the audacity to lose a game now and then.

chisoxfanatic
07-08-2011, 08:38 AM
1968 was the last year of the 15" high pitcher's mound. The reason they lowered it was because of the pitching domination and paucity of offense. Sox pitching had a team ERA of 2.75
Does a higher pitcher's mound make it harder for a batter to "see" the ball or something?

BleacherBandit
07-08-2011, 08:45 AM
This is why us "old timers" laugh at the young ones who want to jump ship because the current team has the audacity to lose a game now and then.

I weathered the storm of 2007, damnit! My fandom can survive anything!

Moses_Scurry
07-08-2011, 08:52 AM
I listened to just about every game on WMAQ in '86 and '87 with an ancient clock radio in my room after my mom had gone to bed. Those teams were godawful. Even though I listened to all of those games, the single game I remember from those two years was Jack McDowell's major league debut. I thought we had a perrenial Cy Young winner after that game. I was sort of right.

I attended a game in 1987 (I think) where the Sox lost to the Angels something like 15-13. There were multiple rain delays and 3-4 homeruns. I remember Fregosi quoting that 13 runs was more than the team normally scored in a week.

No year in the '00's compares to those late '80's teams in terms of suckiness.

Noneck
07-08-2011, 08:57 AM
Up until 68 was all good, maybe not for ones now a days that like big offensive production, but excellent baseball was played then. Tough times from 68-71 but in 71 Harry Caray came and that helped ease the pain. In 72 Hemond, Tanner and Dick Allen made things very enjoyable.

You also have to remember even in the bad times going to the park on a sunday and getting a nice front row left field grandstand seat at $1.75 for a doubleheader made bad Sox baseball tolerable.

russ99
07-08-2011, 09:23 AM
It's kind of ironic that we have this thread, since it's looking like the league is transitioning back to a pitcher's league. Runs, BA, RISP and OPS are all way below recently normal levels league-wide this year. But maybe in the second half, the hitters will get the upper hand.

I have very few memories of the Sox before 1972 (when I was age 6), but I think that's for good reason.

I do have a memory of my dad going off on "Stinky" Stanky, though.

TomBradley72
07-08-2011, 09:24 AM
Those teams in the late 70's ('78-'79) were truly awful.

One lowpoint was the White Sox played a double header vs. Toronto. Comiskey Park had hosted one of those all day concerts with multiple bands, etc a few days before- it had rained and at least a third of the outfield (from the right field foul line- to right center) had turned to mud, they didn't re-sod the area- it was just sand- no grass- just sand.

Claudell Washington stanging in the middle of a "beach" in RF, wearing those horrible uniforms Mary Frances Veeck designed, as the White Sox played a meaningless DH against another horrible team in front of about 14,000 fans.

Game 1:

1. Squires 1b
2. Bannister lf
3. Orta 2b
4. Johnson dh
5. Lemon cf
6. Washington rf
7. Pryor ss
8. May c
9. Morrison 3b

Kravec p

Game 2:

1. Garr lf
2. Torres cf
3. Orta 2b
4. Johnson dh
5. Squires 1b
6. Pryor ss
7. Washington rf
8. Nahorodny c
9. Bell 3b

Scarbery p

eriqjaffe
07-08-2011, 09:27 AM
Does a higher pitcher's mound make it harder for a batter to "see" the ball or something?Apparently, the higher mound makes it easier for pitchers to throw harder, since they have gravity working for them a bit more. Also, a higher mound creates more downward movement, which is a tougher angle for a hitter to judge.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/459596-how-does-slope-affect-baseball/

I would imagine the downward movement would also increase the number of ground balls.

Procol Harum
07-08-2011, 09:28 AM
It was a tough go in those days, that's for sure. Having that fabulous pitching staff, pretty good defense in most years, and ready to do backflips when a Sox hitter would hit .270 or reach the magic 20-homer mark sometime in late September. My Dad was a Cardinals fan and would poke fun of the Sox via Jack Brickhouse's seeming mantra after each Sox turn at bat: "No runs, no hits, no errors, nobody left". :(:

billcissell
07-08-2011, 09:29 AM
I began following the Sox as a kid back in 1962. The Sox were usually the second best team in the AL. The Yankees were the kingpins of the league. Baltimore and Detroit usually had good teams. Minnesota and Cleveland were occasionally competitive. The Angels and Senators were expansion teams. The old KC Athletics and Boston were usually crap. There were no divisions and no playoffs. You play 162 games, win the league and go to the Series.

You ask about the Sox in the late 60s? The franchise was in complete disarray. There was turmoil among the Allen family that owned the team, as well as financial problems. The old park was perceived as dangerous, especially at night. Attendance was pitiful, which is why they played some "home" games in Milwaukee. The Sox were a very poor hitting team. But pitching and defense kept us in every game. The Sox usually had the best starting rotation and bullpen in the AL.

For more than 20 years the Sox were in constant jeopardy of being moved - to Seattle, Milwaukee, Denver, St. Petersburg. A certain degree of stability was gained when the state legislature approved the new ball park in 1988. Prior to that, there were always rumors of the franchise moving away.

Also keep in mind that the Cubs became incredibly popular in the mid to late 60s with the arrival of Durocher. They became competitive for the first time in 20 years, and baseball fans in Chicago and around the country fell in love with the North Siders. The Sox were pushed to the background, and the number of true Sox fans fell off dramatically in the late 60s.

Back in the late 60s the Sox games were broadcast on UHF television (remember Jack Drees?). The picture was usually snowy. And the only radio outlet was a 5,000-watt station in LaGrange, which was hard to pick up even in the Chicago area. The Sox in the late 60s were definitely treated like the red-headed step child.

I remember well going to the old ball park back back then. The team rarely drew well, usually only a few thousand per game. They hit rock bottom in 1970 when they lost 106 games. They still couldn't hit, but by then the pitching and defense were also faltering.

Things started turning around in the early 70s. Tanner, Hemond and the arrival of Dick Allen literally saved the franchise. People started coming back out to see the Sox play. And the team became more competitive. A few years later Bill Veeck came back on the scene and the Sox were always at least entertaining. Veeck didn't have the bank roll to compete in the brave new world of free agency, so Reinsdorf and company took over in 1981.

As a long-time Sox fan, I'm just glad that this team didn't take off for St. Petersburg or Seattle or Denver a long time ago. As far as this year's team not being able to hit, I'm still hoping they'll come around soon.

Lip Man 1
07-08-2011, 11:27 AM
How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years?

Because from 55 (when I was born - not that I remember any of it :D:) through 67 (when I was 12), the Sox averaged 89 wins a year (and remember before 1961 you only played 154 games), had six seasons of 90+ wins and never had a losing season.

Didn't like what happened in the late 60's was shocked by it actually but by 1971 things were on a much better road thanks to Hemond and Tanner.

The issues in the 60's and 70's (even when the Sox were winning) was always the same...ownership.

They either didn't have the will or the funds needed to fix the issues that were wrong... be it on the field, in the farm system or to Comiskey Park.

Lip

Dick Allen
07-08-2011, 12:08 PM
After the Sox almost won it in 1967, it was evidently decided that the Sox needed some more bats (which was true) but acquired over-the-hill players such as Tommy Davis and Russ Snyder. Towards the end of the '67 season, they had already acquired over-the-hill Rocky Colavito and Ken Boyer. This is when their downhill slide started. As Lip pointed out, ownership was a major problem. They also had a GM named Eddie Short, who was godawful. Those of you who want to see KW ridden out of town, should have seen this guy. You'd definitely be appreciating KW a lot more.

Lip Man 1
07-08-2011, 12:12 PM
Dick:

In fairness to Short (who was by the way...) he was responsible for the absolutely brilliant deals that brough the Sox Pete Ward, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dave Nicholson, Ron Hansen, Tommy Agee, Tommy John and Johnny Romano which changed the course of the franchise from 63-65.

After 67 as you pointed out though he turned 180 degress and got rid of Agee, Bob Locker, Tommy McCraw, Al Weis...basically the entire speed aspect of the club for nothing,. garbage and the results were predictable.

Lip

wilburaga
07-08-2011, 12:13 PM
1968 through 1970 was the absolute pits. Even after the late September swoon in 1967, I had no idea what was coming. Just looking at the names on those rosters is depressing.

Then, in 1969, when things looked like they couldn't possibly get worse, the most promising player the Sox had developed in my lifetime blows off half his thumb in a military accident and is never really the same.

All I can say is bless you Chuck Tanner, Roland Hemond, Dick Allen and all the redeemers of the early 70s. I particularly loved the '72 team where three pitchers (Wood, Bahnsen and Bradley) made more than 84% of our starts.

SI1020
07-08-2011, 12:15 PM
After the Sox almost won it in 1967, it was evidently decided that the Sox needed some more bats (which was true) but acquired over-the-hill players such as Tommy Davis and Russ Snyder. Towards the end of the '67 season, they had already acquired over-the-hill Rocky Colavito and Ken Boyer. This is when their downhill slide started. As Lip pointed out, ownership was a major problem. They also had a GM named Eddie Short, who was godawful. Those of you who want to see KW ridden out of town, should have seen this guy. You'd definitely be appreciating KW a lot more. Actually he was a little like KW in that he got worse as time went on. His trade that brought, Wilhelm, Hansen and Pete Ward to the Sox was both a blockbuster and a lifesaver. After winning the pennant in 59 the Sox slid to 3rd, 4th and 5th the next 3 years. Most of the prognosticators were predicting a return to losing seasons before the 63 season. That trade energized the team and helped lead to consecutive 94, 98 and 95 win seasons.

Edit: Sorry didn't see Lip Man's post.

Dick Allen
07-08-2011, 12:26 PM
Dick:

In fairness to Short (who was by the way...) he was responsible for the absolutely brilliant deals that brough the Sox Pete Ward, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dave Nicholson, Ron Hansen, Tommy Agee, Tommy John and Johnny Romano which changed the course of the franchise from 63-65.

After 67 as you pointed out though he turned 180 degress and got rid of Agee, Bob Locker, Tommy McCraw, Al Weis...basically the entire speed aspect of the club for nothing,. garbage and the results were predictable.

LipYeah, the trade that got Agee, John, and Romano for Landis and Hershberger was a good trade, though not giving us building blocks for a World Series. Getting Wilhelm, Ward and Hansen was decent also. I say only decent because it cost us Luis Aparicio. It just seemed that when things really needed to get done, Short sat on his hands. Again, that may have had a lot to do with ownership.

Lip Man 1
07-08-2011, 01:03 PM
Dick:

After the 62 season Aparicio was pissed at Short and the Sox because his salary was cut the maximum 20%. Short felt he was slowing down after seven years, when the chance to move him for good talent came up (as well as to shed a higher salary) Short jumped at it.

Also Short and the Sox made legit offers and tried very hard to get Yaz, Frank Robinson and Hawk at various times in the 1960's only to be turned down. The O's in fact made the deal with the Reds for Robby and got less back than the Sox were offering. Never could figure that one out.

Lip

Procol Harum
07-08-2011, 01:15 PM
There is nowhere near enough Sox luv for Wilbur Wood--he carried our pitching staff for 4 years, 1971-1974.

g0g0
07-08-2011, 01:29 PM
Kinda :offtopic: but Uni Watch had a good pic of the 1971 White Sox uniform unveiling. Funny to see actual white "sox" on the stirrups.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5151/5828421297_238b440899_o.jpg

LITTLE NELL
07-08-2011, 01:33 PM
1968 through 1970 was the absolute pits. Even after the late September swoon in 1967, I had no idea what was coming. Just looking at the names on those rosters is depressing.

Then, in 1969, when things looked like they couldn't possibly get worse, the most promising player the Sox had developed in my lifetime blows off half his thumb in a military accident and is never really the same.

All I can say is bless you Chuck Tanner, Roland Hemond, Dick Allen and all the redeemers of the early 70s. I particularly loved the '72 team where three pitchers (Wood, Bahnsen and Bradley) made more than 84% of our starts.

I also enjoyed the 71 season as the fans must have believed in the new regime. We improved by 23 games and finished 79-83. We beat the A's on opening day in Oakland, it was a DH and we came home 2-0 and the fans came out of the woodwork and 44,000 showed up to see the Sox beat the Twins. Harry arrived on the scene that year and he made every game sound like the 7th game of the World Series. Bill Melton also made us proud by leading the league in homers, first time in Sox history.
That season set up the contending team in 72 as we traded for Allen in the off season and we made a nice run of it that year. If Melton didn't hurt his back we might have won in 72. By 1975 things were starting to fall apart again and Veeck arrived in 76 and led us to one of the greatest 4 months in Sox history, the Southside Hitmen of 1977. What a fun year that was.

TomBradley72
07-08-2011, 02:02 PM
Kinda :offtopic: but Uni Watch had a good pic of the 1971 White Sox uniform unveiling. Funny to see actual white "sox" on the stirrups.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5151/5828421297_238b440899_o.jpg

I like the "White Sox" part of the road jersey- they should add it to the current version.

doublem23
07-08-2011, 02:04 PM
I like the "White Sox" part of the road jersey- they should add it to the current version.

We do need to add our brand to more things

Crestani
07-08-2011, 02:25 PM
This team is currently on pace to score 644 runs this season, which would be the most inept offensive output in my entire Sox fandom (I started following this team around '89/'90). Looking at Baseball-Reference, it looks like those teams from the mid-60s through the mid-70s could give this team a run for its money when it comes to offensive sucktitude. The 1968 Sox only scored 463 runs! :o:

How on earth did you elder Sox fans last through those years? I'm so not used to offensive suckage of this proportion!


Simply because, when you become a Sox fan at an early age like most of us did back then, you became a Sox fan for life....Plus, we probably undertsand and can endure the futility today better than most modern day Sox fans..!!:D:

DumpJerry
07-08-2011, 05:06 PM
Does a higher pitcher's mound make it harder for a batter to "see" the ball or something?
More fastballs, less breaking stuff. Starters went much deeper per game and complete games were very common.

Lip Man 1
07-08-2011, 05:42 PM
Fanatic:

The higher mound meant pitchers were throwing downhill more easily. More velocity in general terms. Plus umpires in those days actually called the high strike. The zone was from under the armpits to just above the knee.

Lip

TommyJohn
07-08-2011, 07:58 PM
I listened to just about every game on WMAQ in '86 and '87 with an ancient clock radio in my room after my mom had gone to bed. Those teams were godawful. Even though I listened to all of those games, the single game I remember from those two years was Jack McDowell's major league debut. I thought we had a perrenial Cy Young winner after that game. I was sort of right.

I attended a game in 1987 (I think) where the Sox lost to the Angels something like 15-13. There were multiple rain delays and 3-4 homeruns. I remember Fregosi quoting that 13 runs was more than the team normally scored in a week.

No year in the '00's compares to those late '80's teams in terms of suckiness.


I remember listening to a game in 1987 against the Rangers in Arlington-th Sox were winning 7-2 in the bottom of the 9th and Rangers came back to tie it. In extras Ivan Calderon hit a two run home run that caused Lorn Brown (who could give homer Hawk a run for his money) to scream himself into a hernia. In the bottom of the inning, Odibe McDowell hit a dramatic grand slam to give the Rangers an 11-9 win. Lorn Brown didn't even attempt to hide his disgust as he announced the homer leaving the yard.

Nellie_Fox
07-09-2011, 12:12 AM
Fanatic:

The higher mound meant pitchers were throwing downhill more easily. More velocity in general terms. Plus umpires in those days actually called the high strike. The zone was from under the armpits to just above the knee.

LipEspecially American League umps, who used the balloon chest protector so they stood up higher, directly behind the catcher, instead of crouching down behind him peeking over his shoulder. I still think they called a more honest strike with the balloon, both at the letters and on the corners.

I spent the '69 season in Army training, and the '70 season in Viet Nam, so I had no clue what was going on in either season. Sure didn't miss much.

Paulwny
07-12-2011, 12:59 PM
My wife and I started dating in 1966. Since that time I no longer live or die with every Sox win or loss. Although I still go on an occassional rant after a tough loss.

Carolina Kenny
07-12-2011, 01:27 PM
Those teams in the late 70's ('78-'79) were truly awful.

One lowpoint was the White Sox played a double header vs. Toronto. Comiskey Park had hosted one of those all day concerts with multiple bands, etc a few days before- it had rained and at least a third of the outfield (from the right field foul line- to right center) had turned to mud, they didn't re-sod the area- it was just sand- no grass- just sand.

Claudell Washington stanging in the middle of a "beach" in RF, wearing those horrible uniforms Mary Frances Veeck designed, as the White Sox played a meaningless DH against another horrible team in front of about 14,000 fans.

Nothing says Sox suckatude like the late 60's early 70's. The uniforms were ugly, the fans drunk or stoned, those were the days.

Game 1:

1. Squires 1b-Spanky-also played once as a LH throwing catcher?
2. Bannister lf-good hit bad field SS turned OF
3. Orta 2b-a mini Cano for that era
4. Johnson dh-Big Lamar-still coaching I think
5. Lemon cf-the one that got away-the best Sox CF in my lifetime
6. Washington rf-Washington Slept Here-all-time great sign
7. Pryor ss-journeyman utility
8. May c big LH
9. Morrison 3b-Jim Morrision of the Doors-put up good number with the Bucs

Kravec-One of our myriad lefties we accumulated because, they were lefties

Game 2:

1. Garr lf-the roadrunner-makes Pierre look acceptable in the field
2. Torres cf-I think five players named Torres kept playing for us. They all sucked.
3. Orta 2b-could actually hit-bad on the double play turn
4. Johnson dh-Big Lamar-he was big.
5. Squires 1b-Spanky-great field, no power, perfect.
6. Pryor ss-utility guy forced to start
7. Washington rf-always slept here
8. Nahorodny c Naha, Aha
9. Bell 3b-looked the part, played like crap, perfect.

Scarbery p-Scarbery Fair- no, Scarbery Bad

LITTLE NELL
07-12-2011, 01:33 PM
My wife and I started dating in 1966. Since that time I no longer live or die with every Sox win or loss. Although I still go on an occassional rant after a tough loss.

I will be 66 in February and I keep waiting for that time when the White Sox are not one of the most important things in my life. As of today they still are. I still get up in the middle of the night to check the score if the guys are on the west coast with a night game. When they win its great to be alive but when they lose I'm a miserable human being, just ask my wife. I have never felt this way about any other sports team, the Blackhawks came close back in the day of Mikita, Pilote, Hall and Hull but the Bears and Bulls never even came close to the feelings and love I have for the White Sox. They are like family and I guess they always will be.

Paulwny
07-12-2011, 02:59 PM
I will be 66 in February and I keep waiting for that time when the White Sox are not one of the most important things in my life. As of today they still are. I still get up in the middle of the night to check the score if the guys are on the west coast with a night game. When they win its great to be alive but when they lose I'm a miserable human being, just ask my wife. I have never felt this way about any other sports team, the Blackhawks came close back in the day of Mikita, Pilote, Hall and Hull but the Bears and Bulls never even came close to the feelings and love I have for the White Sox. They are like family and I guess they always will be.

I'm 67, I listened to all the west coast trips when I was married and lived in Western NY, East Coast Time Zone. My wife would shake her head in the morning knowing I only had 5 hrs of sleep before going to work.
Over the yrs the Sox logo remains a part of my family, but not the players. As every year passes the players having a me, me attitude has changed my feelings toward them.
The Sox are still my number one team ahead of the Sabres and Bills.

soxfan1965
07-12-2011, 05:12 PM
1970 was the worst season ever for me to have experienced as a fan, from going to the near empty stadium to watching Jack Drees on TV with the Meister Brau/Falstaff commercials. The difference between a bad season then and now is probably free agency and money. As Bill Melton told me about the 1970 season, you just hoped for the best and saw most everyone next year, since a trade was your way out. Too bad today you coudn't just trade away bad players. 1969 for the Bears was really bad too (and they lost the coin flip for Terry Bradshaw). The good thing about the 69 Bears was it was easier to get tickets. The good thing about the 70 Sox is that they didn't run out of bats on Bat Day (like in 66 or 67) and you could take great pictures on the field on Picture Day. Back then our expectations were lower; today with the money players get, there's little excuse for a Dunn or Rios. Glad that Aparicio made the HOF in spite of being part of that 1970 team.

Bucky F. Dent
07-13-2011, 07:53 AM
Game 1:

1. Squires 1b
2. Bannister lf
3. Orta 2b
4. Johnson dh
5. Lemon cf
6. Washington rf
7. Pryor ss
8. May c
9. Morrison 3b

Kravec p

Game 2:

1. Garr lf
2. Torres cf
3. Orta 2b
4. Johnson dh
5. Squires 1b
6. Pryor ss
7. Washington rf
8. Nahorodny c
9. Bell 3b

Scarbery p

My God! Those are some frightening names from my childhood. This is one of the reasons why I have no answer when people ask me who my favorite sox player was growing up! Ralph Garr, Jorge Orta, Lamar Johnson, really!?!?!

TomBradley72
07-13-2011, 08:00 AM
My God! Those are some frightening names from my childhood. This is one of the reasons why I have no answer when people ask me who my favorite sox player was growing up! Ralph Garr, Jorge Orta, Lamar Johnson, really!?!?!

I remember being on a big "play Wayne Nordhagen more" kick during this era- 1978-1980 was a very brutal 3 years- almost as low as 1968-70- especially with those horrible uniforms adding to the futility of the franchise.

Hitmen77
07-13-2011, 08:05 AM
I remember listening to a game in 1987 against the Rangers in Arlington-th Sox were winning 7-2 in the bottom of the 9th and Rangers came back to tie it. In extras Ivan Calderon hit a two run home run that caused Lorn Brown (who could give homer Hawk a run for his money) to scream himself into a hernia. In the bottom of the inning, Odibe McDowell hit a dramatic grand slam to give the Rangers an 11-9 win. Lorn Brown didn't even attempt to hide his disgust as he announced the homer leaving the yard.

:?: Lorn Brown could give Hawk a run for his money for being a homer?

Wow, I remember Lorn Brown being rather low key and quietly doing a good job on the radio side in the late 70s while Harry and Jimmy were soaking up the spotlight.

Maybe my memories from my childhood fail me. Perhaps someone who has tracked the Sox and the media like Lip can enlighten us on what Lorn Brown was like.

ohiosoxfan
07-13-2011, 08:34 AM
Thanks for bringing up this topic. . . great memories even though the teams weren't very good. Maybe in some way, that is what made it enjoyable. You didn't expect to win (like we do now) and so when the team played well or beat Oakland or Baltimore it was really exciting. It was really kind of an underdog mentality and the during the 72 season, you couldn't wait to turn on the TV each day for the latest episode of Sox baseball.

PeteWard
07-13-2011, 08:42 AM
I remember being on a big "play Wayne Nordhagen more" kick during this era- 1978-1980 was a very brutal 3 years- almost as low as 1968-70- especially with those horrible uniforms adding to the futility of the franchise.

The uniforms that replaced them were 10 times worse and remain perhaps the worst in major league history. Thank god the Sox went back to what we have now.

PeteWard
07-13-2011, 08:43 AM
:?: Lorn Brown could give Hawk a run for his money for being a homer?

Wow, I remember Lorn Brown being rather low key and quietly doing a good job on the radio side in the late 70s while Harry and Jimmy were soaking up the spotlight.

Maybe my memories from my childhood fail me. Perhaps someone who has tracked the Sox and the media like Lip can enlighten us on what Lorn Brown was like.

Lorn was great. He could get on your nerves sometimes with a litany of stats, but he was excellent. And yes, was low key but a the same time enthusiastic about the game.

Zisk77
07-13-2011, 10:45 AM
-Scarbery Fair- no, Scarbery Bad

Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, & Tyme were in the bullpen warming up.

Lip Man 1
07-13-2011, 11:02 AM
Hitmen:

Ask and ye shall receive:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=3310

R.I.P. Lorn.

Lip

BigKlu59
07-13-2011, 01:47 PM
I will be 66 in February and I keep waiting for that time when the White Sox are not one of the most important things in my life. As of today they still are. I still get up in the middle of the night to check the score if the guys are on the west coast with a night game. When they win its great to be alive but when they lose I'm a miserable human being, just ask my wife. I have never felt this way about any other sports team, the Blackhawks came close back in the day of Mikita, Pilote, Hall and Hull but the Bears and Bulls never even came close to the feelings and love I have for the White Sox. They are like family and I guess they always will be.

Geeze.. I"m getting long in the tooth, so's you must have some fine looking chiclets in that Sox smile of yours..

As been alluded to by all of the guys that followed this franchise from the mid 50's to that dreadfull drop off in 68...,The Chicago White Sox were a COMPETATIVE TEAM that with a little Kismet could have played in about a half dozen or more October's.. Sure, the "Lightning Lumber" didnt bounce the ball off of the Centerfield Scoreboard, but the "Prodigeous Pitching", Excellent Fielding, Technical Execution and Baserunning Skills held you glued to your seat till the last out was recorded. It just so happened we had alot of our friend "Murphy" showing up at the most inoppourtune times along the way.. I used to make a joke to my friends that someone should find him in the crowd, buy him a beer and send his ass 8 miles north where he belongs..

Didnt see much of the 50's.. I was blessed to be in town for that Sox/Hawks cycle of the Halcyon 60's where both teams kept you wrapped up in the seasons Highs and Lows till the Equipment Mrg. had to collect the tools of battle. Funny when 68 rolled around both franchises started to slip after that run..

The Sox had the Yanks... The Hawks had the Hab's.. Nothing could be finer than beating each of these teams, nothing could be worse if ya lost.

BUT ATLEAST THESE TWO TEAMS GAVE THESE BUMS A RUN FOR THEIR MONEY EACH SEASON in the 60's... More than I could say for some other teams on this town during that decade..

Ya, when those 3 years rounded out the 60's and we slipped into baseball hell. it felt like the earth had tilted.. Wilbur, Bill, Carlos and Dick kept the hope alive.. It was a quite a surprise when a Sox Player won the HR Championship that season.. In Cavernous Comiskey that is quite the accoplishment..

White Sox Forever !!!!

BK59

SCarolina_Ron
07-14-2011, 05:32 PM
Geez you guys are giving this old fart (almost 60) goosebumps and wispy eyes! :whiner: The Sox have been a major part of my life since around '57 when we moved to Oak Park. I lived in Omaha a few years in the 80's and bought a GE "Superradio" that had extra AM sensitivity plus strung an external AM antenna just to hear the Sox (major problem during thunderstorms). Here's to a great 2nd half and beyond!:gulp:

Paulwny
07-14-2011, 08:58 PM
Geez you guys are giving this old fart (almost 60) goosebumps and wispy eyes! :whiner: The Sox have been a major part of my life since around '57 when we moved to Oak Park. I lived in Omaha a few years in the 80's and bought a GE "Superradio" that had extra AM sensitivity plus strung an external AM antenna just to hear the Sox (major problem during thunderstorms). Here's to a great 2nd half and beyond!:gulp:


That GE radio was the best for picking-up Sox games back in Western NY.

KenBerryGrab
07-15-2011, 09:23 AM
I have the Superadio III and use it to pull in Farmio and DJ all the time.