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View Full Version : CTA Train Tracker added to 35th Street stops on Red and Green Line


doublem23
06-17-2011, 02:39 PM
Good news!

http://www.redeyechicago.com/news/cta/redeye-cta-adds-train-tracker-to-16-rail-stations-20110616,0,709127.photogallery

chisoxfanatic
06-17-2011, 02:53 PM
How does the thing look? Is it like a little map that has a moving dot showing you exactly where the train is at the present second?

doublem23
06-17-2011, 03:18 PM
How does the thing look? Is it like a little map that has a moving dot showing you exactly where the train is at the present second?

No, it's just a board that lists upcoming trains in order of their approximate arrivale time.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4022/4501383726_177e5b7d0f.jpg

Gavin
06-17-2011, 03:22 PM
I don't think anyone has had a problem waiting for a train after the Sox game. How bout adding it to the train lines people actually use when there's not a Sox game. Like.. people who work.

Like the blue line. That's where I'm goin with that.

doublem23
06-17-2011, 03:36 PM
I don't think anyone has had a problem waiting for a train after the Sox game. How bout adding it to the train lines people actually use when there's not a Sox game. Like.. people who work.

Like the blue line. That's where I'm goin with that.


They're slowly phasing them in. In addition to Sox-35th and 35th-Bronzeville-IIT, they're adding them to:

Addison (Red)
47th (Red)
Davis (Purple)
18th (Pink)
Central Park (Pink)
Roosevelt (Red, Orange, Green)
Pulaski (Orange)
Library-State/Van Buren
Oak Park (Green)
Clark/Lake
Logan Square (Blue)
Jefferson Park (Blue)

Frater Perdurabo
06-17-2011, 03:43 PM
They're slowly phasing them in. In addition to Sox-35th and 35th-Bronzeville-IIT, they're adding them to:

Addison (Red)
47th (Red)
Davis (Purple)
18th (Pink)
Central Park (Pink)
Roosevelt (Red, Orange, Green)
Pulaski (Orange)
Library-State/Van Buren
Oak Park (Green)
Clark/Lake
Logan Square (Blue)
Jefferson Park (Blue)



The Washington, D.C. Metro has had these for years. I don't understand why the CTA is just adding them now. DART trains in Dallas don't have them at all. We don't even have turnstiles; passengers pay to ride on "the honor system," backed up by "fare enforcement officers" who sometimes check for tickets.

miker
06-17-2011, 03:46 PM
MOD EDIT - The "no politics" rule is NOT THAT HARD TO FOLLOW

doublem23
06-17-2011, 04:01 PM
The Washington, D.C. Metro has had these for years. I don't understand why the CTA is just adding them now. DART trains in Dallas don't have them at all. We don't even have turnstiles; passengers pay to ride on "the honor system," backed up by "fare enforcement officers" who sometimes check for tickets.

I mean, for practical purposes, they're pretty pointless. Nobody who uses the CTA actually tries to plan a trip based on when a train is going to show, you just go to the station and wait. At its worst, I don't think there is a scheduled delay between CTA trains more than 15 minutes and that's only on the least used lines at the absolute least traveled times. Most published wait times are under 10 minutes.

The only real purpse they serve is to give folks something to do while they wait.

Frater Perdurabo
06-17-2011, 04:21 PM
I mean, for practical purposes, they're pretty pointless. Nobody who uses the CTA actually tries to plan a trip based on when a train is going to show, you just go to the station and wait. At its worst, I don't think there is a scheduled delay between CTA trains more than 15 minutes and that's only on the least used lines at the absolute least traveled times. Most published wait times are under 10 minutes.

The only real purpse they serve is to give folks something to do while they wait.

They are much more useful when you have multiple lines running on the same set of tracks, serving the same station. That way you know that the next train (due in 2 minutes) won't take you to your destination, but the following one (due in 7 minutes) will.

dickallen15
06-17-2011, 04:25 PM
If they put it up outside the station, that would be more useful.

doublem23
06-17-2011, 04:27 PM
They are much more useful when you have multiple lines running on the same set of tracks, serving the same station. That way you know that the next train (due in 2 minutes) won't take you to your destination, but the following one (due in 7 minutes) will.

Well that really doesn't really happen here much, except for, obviously, the Loop and a few other notable examples like the Brown/Red/Purple running together on the North Side Main Line and the Green and Pink running together between the Loop and Paulina Connector.

But, your example doesn't make any sense to me. Why does the 1st train not get you to your stop but the 2nd one does? Don't you just need to know which line to ride? If there are multiple lines on the same track, isn't it more important to know that you should be on the "X" train and not the "Y"? Again, I don't see how knowing what time the train actually arrives serves any purpse other than just giving you something to do.

Gavin
06-17-2011, 04:32 PM
I mean, for practical purposes, they're pretty pointless. Nobody who uses the CTA actually tries to plan a trip based on when a train is going to show, you just go to the station and wait. At its worst, I don't think there is a scheduled delay between CTA trains more than 15 minutes and that's only on the least used lines at the absolute least traveled times. Most published wait times are under 10 minutes.

The only real purpse they serve is to give folks something to do while they wait.

If I walked up to the station and saw that the blue line train wasn't coming for 15 minutes (and would be packed), and knew a 56 bus was coming in 3, I'd head back downstairs and take the bus. There are other options than waiting around.

Frater Perdurabo
06-17-2011, 04:34 PM
But, your example doesn't make any sense to me. Why does the 1st train not get you to your stop but the 2nd one does? Don't you just need to know which line to ride? If there are multiple lines on the same track, isn't it more important to know that you should be on the "X" train and not the "Y"? Again, I don't see how knowing what time the train actually arrives serves any purpse other than just giving you something to do.

In downtown Dallas, the Red, Blue, Green and Orange lines all run on the same tracks. But after running together and serving the same stations for a distance, they diverge at various points, serving different stations and terminating in different suburbs. Yes, you need to know what train to board, but if you know that the nearest upcoming train, and the subsequent train, are not the color/line you want, but the third train is, you can get back and out of the way for the people who do need to get on the nearest upcoming train. These types of signs are just an added convenience for riders that would help make the system work a little better.

doublem23
06-17-2011, 04:47 PM
In downtown Dallas, the Red, Blue, Green and Orange lines all run on the same tracks. But after running together and serving the same stations for a distance, they diverge at various points, serving different stations and terminating in different suburbs. Yes, you need to know what train to board, but if you know that the nearest upcoming train, and the subsequent train, are not the color/line you want, but the third train is, you can get back and out of the way for the people who do need to get on the nearest upcoming train. These types of signs are just an added convenience for riders that would help make the system work a little better.

I suppose, but I think a better solution to Dallas' problem seems to be to teach people not to be such dicks and apparently box other people out. I get on and off the Loop everyday in Downtown Chicago on a set of tracks that serves multiple lines in both directions and somehow I am able to get on and off trains without any real problem.

If I walked up to the station and saw that the blue line train wasn't coming for 15 minutes (and would be packed), and knew a 56 bus was coming in 3, I'd head back downstairs and take the bus. There are other options than waiting around.

Yeah, I suppose that's true, although, I'm sure you know by now that you can do all of that with a phone. I'll admit Train Tracker would make your ride better, but I'm still going to go with 90-95% + of rides on the CTA wouldn't change much with the addition of the signs, people are still going to just walk to their station when they're ready to go and wait for the train to show up.

Frater Perdurabo
06-17-2011, 04:49 PM
Dallas' problem seems to be to teach people not to be such dicks

Q F T :bandance:

DSpivack
06-17-2011, 05:12 PM
The Washington, D.C. Metro has had these for years. I don't understand why the CTA is just adding them now. DART trains in Dallas don't have them at all. We don't even have turnstiles; passengers pay to ride on "the honor system," backed up by "fare enforcement officers" who sometimes check for tickets.

I mean, for practical purposes, they're pretty pointless. Nobody who uses the CTA actually tries to plan a trip based on when a train is going to show, you just go to the station and wait. At its worst, I don't think there is a scheduled delay between CTA trains more than 15 minutes and that's only on the least used lines at the absolute least traveled times. Most published wait times are under 10 minutes.

The only real purpse they serve is to give folks something to do while they wait.

You also have to wait longer at non-peak times in DC than you do here, from my experience.