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View Full Version : Best athletes ditching baseball for other sports


Fenway
05-15-2011, 09:30 AM
As the article points out, it is no longer just black athletes going to the other sports but white players as well.

problem seems to be lack of baseball scholarships in college


http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/2011/05/14/2011-05-14_best_athletes_ditching_baseball_for_other_sport s_making_soso_mlb_pitchers_look_g.html

Daver
05-15-2011, 09:31 AM
You don't need to be an athlete to be a ball player.

Red Barchetta
05-15-2011, 10:00 AM
You don't need to be an athlete to be a ball player.

I agree. Some of the best athletes are not good baseball players and some of the best baseball players are not the best athletes.

NLaloosh
05-15-2011, 10:51 AM
You don't need to be an athlete to be a ball player.


Agreed. That's why you would think they would play this pansy sport and take it easy on their bodies instead of getting it destroyed playing hockey, basketball or football. This is so much easier. Look at Dunn for example he couldn't last 5 minutes playing any other sport right now and he makes $ 56 mil. dollars for sitting on his butt during 95% of the game.

kittle42
05-15-2011, 01:30 PM
this pansy sport

Nice going.

JermaineDye05
05-15-2011, 01:47 PM
Baseball may not be as athletic as other sports, but it certainly takes a great amount of skill. Hitting a baseball is far harder than catching a ball and running and shooting a ball in a hoop.

Of all the sports, I'd probably say hockey is the most difficult.

Red Barchetta
05-15-2011, 02:28 PM
Baseball may not be as athletic as other sports, but it certainly takes a great amount of skill. Hitting a baseball is far harder than catching a ball and running and shooting a ball in a hoop.

Of all the sports, I'd probably say hockey is the most difficult.

I agree. Imagine all the skills needed to play baseball, basketball and football and then slap on a set of skates and have to perform those skills on ice.

Hitting a baseball consistently is the hardest thing to do in professional sports. If you are successful 3 out of every 10 attempts, you are a superstar and very well paid.

Michael Jordan is arguably the best basketball player ever. However as great a basketball player he was and and as great an athlete he was, he could not hit a baseball consistently. The same with his attempt at golf.

Just because you are a great athlete, doesn't necessarily guarantee success at a particular sport.

DSpivack
05-15-2011, 03:18 PM
I agree. Imagine all the skills needed to play baseball, basketball and football and then slap on a set of skates and have to performa those skills on ice.

Hitting a baseball consistently is the hardest thing to do in professional sports. If you are successfull 3 out of every 10 attempts, you are a superstar and very well paid.

Michael Jordan is arguably the best basketball player ever. However as great a basketball player he was and and as great an athlete he was, he could not hit a baseball consistently. The same with his attempt at golf.

Just because you are a great athlete, doesn't necessarily guarantee success at a particular sport.

I thought he was a pretty good [amateur] golfer?

Soxman24
05-15-2011, 03:30 PM
I agree. Imagine all the skills needed to play baseball, basketball and football and then slap on a set of skates and have to performa those skills on ice.

Hitting a baseball consistently is the hardest thing to do in professional sports. If you are successfull 3 out of every 10 attempts, you are a superstar and very well paid.

Michael Jordan is arguably the best basketball player ever. However as great a basketball player he was and and as great an athlete he was, he could not hit a baseball consistently. The same with his attempt at golf.

Just because you are a great athlete, doesn't necessarily guarantee success at a particular sport.

For the most part you are correct, in spring training with the Sox in 94 he hit .202 with 51 RBIs. Later that year in the Arizona Fall League he hit .252 and was slowly improving. I was watching a special on HBO regarding Jordan's time in the minors and Terry Francona (The Birmingham manager at the time) belived Jordan was getting better little by little, and that if it were not for the strike of 94 he never would have returned to the NBA.

pearso66
05-15-2011, 03:40 PM
For the most part you are correct, in spring training with the Sox in 94 he hit .202 with 51 RBIs. Later that year in the Arizona Fall League he hit .252 and was slowly improving. I was watching a special on HBO regarding Jordan's time in the minors and Terry Francona (The Birmingham manager at the time) belived Jordan was getting better little by little, and that if it were not for the strike of 94 he never would have returned to the NBA.

People also have to remember he hadn't played baseball since high school. He did pretty well for himself considering not playing for so long.

gobears1987
05-15-2011, 04:10 PM
You don't have to be an athletic person to play baseball. Bobby Jenks. C.C. Sabathia, and Bartolo Colon have all proven that one.

Daver
05-15-2011, 04:22 PM
You don't have to be an athletic person to play baseball. Bobby Jenks. C.C. Sabathia, and Bartolo Colon have all proven that one.

Kinda poor examples as none of them have to play offense.

gobears1987
05-15-2011, 04:25 PM
Kinda poor examples as none of them have to play offense.

Babe Ruth

Skilled: Yes
Athletic: No

Daver
05-15-2011, 04:30 PM
Babe Ruth

Skilled: Yes
Athletic: No

He also played eighty years ago, still not a real good example.

Athletic does not equal athlete either, much like speed does not equal range.

WhiteSox5187
05-15-2011, 06:04 PM
He also played eighty years ago, still not a real good example.

Athletic does not equal athlete either, much like speed does not equal range.

How about Prince Fielder? One does not look at him and think "Oh there's an athlete."

SephClone89
05-15-2011, 06:08 PM
He also played eighty years ago, still not a real good example.

Athletic does not equal athlete either, much like speed does not equal range.

You have a really weird hangup on the whole "athlete" thing. Don't you consider NASCAR drivers more athletic than most sports players?

Daver
05-15-2011, 06:43 PM
You have a really weird hangup on the whole "athlete" thing. Don't you consider NASCAR drivers more athletic than most sports players?


No.


But if you are going to call all participants of professional sports under the sweeping term "athlete" than race car drivers should be included.

Was John Daly an athlete?

How about William Perry?

Or Charles Barkley?

Bobby Thigpen
05-15-2011, 08:31 PM
How about Prince Fielder? One does not look at him and think "Oh there's an athlete."
Prince Fielder would make a great defensive tackle.

TDog
05-15-2011, 10:41 PM
Baseball may not be as athletic as other sports, but it certainly takes a great amount of skill. Hitting a baseball is far harder than catching a ball and running and shooting a ball in a hoop.

Of all the sports, I'd probably say hockey is the most difficult.

You don't need to be an athlete to play baseball, of course. When I was a junior high school teacher and coaching the baseball team, the best pitcher was the least athletic player on the team. There are players who can hit extremely well who are not at all athletic.

It really depends on how you define "athlete," though. If you're talking about running/skating making moves and jumping (there wouldn't seem to be a lot of jumping in hockey, but figure skaters, like gymnasts, have to be superior athletes to complete because they are scored exclusively on their athleticism), you don't need to be an athlete to play baseball. And Michael Jordan wasn't very good at professional baseball. But baseball requires athletic skills that other sports don't. I've been told by kinetics people that you use muscles in baseball you don't use in any other sport.

I don't think it's that baseball players aren't athletes or that athletes don't play baseball because it isn't athletic. I think one reason fewer athletes are playing baseball is that it's so difficult, probably the most difficult of all sports given a level of athleticism. And aside from hitting in a cage, it's a sport you can't learn to play well unless you are playing it with and against people who can play it.

There are other factors. People have shorter attention spans than they used to, and baseball isn't a game for the short of attention span. It's too bad. I honestly think it would be better for America if more people played baseball.

Nellie_Fox
05-16-2011, 12:12 AM
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_lPXSFMAotRg/S7a4lKk_H6I/AAAAAAAAAD4/KztXdwrA5ac/s1600/John%2BKruk.jpg

"I ain't an athlete lady, I'm a baseball player!"

DSpivack
05-16-2011, 12:28 AM
No.


But if you are going to call all participants of professional sports under the sweeping term "athlete" than race car drivers should be included.

Was John Daly an athlete?

How about William Perry?

Or Charles Barkley?

He wasn't always the slow fatass he is right now.

Nellie_Fox
05-16-2011, 01:05 AM
He wasn't always the slow fatass he is right now.Being fat doesn't always equal non-athletic. Was this guy an athlete:

http://i.cnn.net/si/si_online/covers/images/1975/0414_large.jpg

Hell, yes!

miker
05-16-2011, 07:57 AM
This thread seems to have split in two.

First is whether or not someone who doesn't have sleek physique is or isn't an athlete. They definitely are and can still display their athletic prowess in spite of their extra pounds (Babe Ruth) or the extra poundage is part of their job (a defensive tackle, for example).

Second, the original question as to if young athletes are choosing other sports over baseball is interesting. (Can't read article yet, blocked here at work.) As of now, baseball pays more and has less of a chance of concussion then some of the other contact sports. Also there are plenty of Latin American countries that would be happy to keep pro baseball stocked with players, so if there is a decline in one source, another source would be available to pick up the slack.

How's youth baseball doing compared to youth soccer? Maybe that's what has taken baseball off of some young people's radars.

happydude
05-16-2011, 10:01 AM
I agree with TDog: baseball is simply boring to many who have grown up in a world of faster paced entertainment options.

And, of course, you don't have to necessarily be an "athlete" to play baseball but it certainly has to help. The greater your physical capabilities the greater your chance to develop tools that enhance the likelihood of being effective in any sport.

As an aside, I can't agree with those who believe individuals with more hefty physiques are non-athletic. I watched Barkley from his years at Auburn through his NBA career and, as a young man, he was extremely explosive. How else could a 6 foot 6 (at best) guy become one of the greatest power forwards of all time?

As for Sabathia, the rumor is that he was one hell of a basketball player during his school boy days in California and he has never been considered slim. In fact, my guess is that pitchers are generally among the best athletes on any roster. Most of these guys have been pitching since Little League and were selected to do so precisely because they were the most athletic; usually the best at other sports, too. Babe Ruth was a 20 game winner before he was converted to the outfield; I can't imagine that successful transition not requiring a great deal of athletic ability.

DSpivack
05-16-2011, 12:13 PM
Being fat doesn't always equal non-athletic. Was this guy an athlete:

http://i.cnn.net/si/si_online/covers/images/1975/0414_large.jpg

Hell, yes!

Early in his career with the 76ers and Suns, yes I do think Barkley was an athlete. Hard to be one of the best players in the NBA and not be an athlete.

miker
05-16-2011, 01:39 PM
I agree with TDog: baseball is simply boring to many who have grown up in a world of faster paced entertainment options.

I'll have to agree on this too. The attention-deficit generation is more about instant gratification then the balance between anticipation and reward that a well-paced baseball game provides.

downstairs
05-16-2011, 01:43 PM
Baseball is one of the more difficult sports to organize/play as a kid... not as in little league, I mean getting friends together for a game.

Basketball- you can play with as little of two people on a driveway.

Football- You can play street football with 6 kids and one ball.

Baseball- we found it pretty frustrating to play. The ball can cover so much ground, you need a team of at least 5-6 kids. We improvised by playing something like kickball... kick the ball, run the bases, you're out if you're hit with the ball when you're off a base. Still wasn't that satisfying.

Lamp81
05-16-2011, 11:14 PM
I believe, in the very near future, it will be football that sees the decline of younger players. The NFL is too popular to go away, but with all of the findings of football related head injuries (think Dave Duerson), parents are going to choose to get their kids involved in other sports.

Football, like Boxing, will be a sport that only the very poor youths, looking to improve their life, will take up. Most parents will want to steer their kids to baseball and basketball, as the odds of injuries are far lower.

asindc
05-17-2011, 07:51 AM
I believe, in the very near future, it will be football that sees the decline of younger players. The NFL is too popular to go away, but with all of the findings of football related head injuries (think Dave Duerson), parents are going to choose to get their kids involved in other sports.

Football, like Boxing, will be a sport that only the very poor youths, looking to improve their life, will take up. Most parents will want to steer their kids to baseball and basketball, as the odds of injuries are far lower.

I've met a few former college and pro football players who have steered their kids away from football and into soccer or other sports. The average fan has no idea about the physical toll a player takes after playing a few years in the NFL, and I'm not even talking about the headline-grabbing debilitating injuries. Even guys who don't suffer multiple concussions or extreme ambulatory injuries get ravaged by several "minor" injuries over the course of their careers.