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View Full Version : Baseballís steroid era not going away any time soon


Fenway
04-20-2011, 11:41 AM
Interesting op-ed piece by Gary Thorne in his hometown newspaper in Maine

http://new.bangordailynews.com/2011/04/15/sports/baseball%E2%80%99s-steroid-era-not-going-away-any-time-soon/


Clemens is a perfect example....

We all think he did....but he is willing to go to jail in his continued crusade that he says he never did. The fact that his name has never been mentioned in that list of 103 players in 2003 works for him. I think if he had tested positive his name would have come out by now.

g0g0
04-20-2011, 03:26 PM
Some might say it's a witch hunt going after guys like Clemens and Bonds, but I welcome it. They need to be punished and made an example for future players who are thinking of taking them and trying to beat the system. I don't agree with spending millions upon millions of my tax dollars on the cases though. There has to be a fine line when prosecuting.

Nellie_Fox
04-20-2011, 03:37 PM
I don't agree with spending millions upon millions of my tax dollars on the cases though.You pay millions upon millions of dollars in taxes? I'm impressed.

SI1020
04-20-2011, 03:53 PM
You pay millions upon millions of dollars in taxes? I'm impressed. We all know you are one of the smartest and most accomplished posters here. Why make fun over a niggling little point, one which I totally agree with by the way. The criminal justice system is choking as it is. I'd much rather see the time spent elsewhere, as you posted previously the money is going to be spent anyway. I don't need a jury to tell me that Bonds, Sosa, McGwire, Giambi, Clemons, among others bulked up on illegal substances to get ahead of the competition. My piece of mind and the overall safety of the community aren't served by putting Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens behind bars. There are much bigger fish to fry.

g0g0
04-21-2011, 09:15 AM
You pay millions upon millions of dollars in taxes? I'm impressed.

You know, those tax dollars that build stuff like bridges, roads, schools, etc? I don't pay millions in taxes, but we all benefit from millions of tax money spent. :wink:

Nellie_Fox
04-21-2011, 12:21 PM
The criminal justice system is choking as it is. I'd much rather see the time spent elsewhere, as you posted previously the money is going to be spent anyway. I don't need a jury to tell me that Bonds, Sosa, McGwire, Giambi, Clemons, among others bulked up on illegal substances to get ahead of the competition. My piece of mind and the overall safety of the community aren't served by putting Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens behind bars. There are much bigger fish to fry.Because the legal system depends in very large part on people understanding that they can't lie under oath. The criminal justice system can't operate under a "cost-effectiveness" strategy, or way too many crimes would go un-prosecuted because it costs more to prosecute than they cost society. Besides, as I've already stated, almost all of those costs already exist, whether Bonds gets prosecuted or not. They didn't go out and hire new people to prosecute the case.

Yes, sometimes I can't help myself, and have to have a little fun with a sentence structure that ends up saying something entirely different than what the poster has in mind. I do it very rarely these days.

Fenway
04-21-2011, 12:24 PM
I would guess the Feds are watching to see if any money changes hands between Greg Anderson and Bonds.

The bottom line is without Anderson on the stand they had no case.

Roger is another kettle of fish..... Congress told him we don't care what you say or don't say - JUST DON'T LIE

My own take on Roger is when he admitted he let his wife take steroids that was game, set and match.

daveeym
04-21-2011, 12:36 PM
Interesting op-ed piece by Gary Thorne in his hometown newspaper in Maine

http://new.bangordailynews.com/2011/04/15/sports/baseball%E2%80%99s-steroid-era-not-going-away-any-time-soon/


Clemens is a perfect example....

We all think he did....but he is willing to go to jail in his continued crusade that he says he never did. The fact that his name has never been mentioned in that list of 103 players in 2003 works for him. I think if he had tested positive his name would have come out by now.Bull****, he risks what, a couple months, likely less in any jail? He doesn't forfeit what actually matters to him, the money. Eyes don't lie.

daveeym
04-21-2011, 12:42 PM
We all know you are one of the smartest and most accomplished posters here. Why make fun over a niggling little point, one which I totally agree with by the way. The criminal justice system is choking as it is. I'd much rather see the time spent elsewhere, as you posted previously the money is going to be spent anyway. I don't need a jury to tell me that Bonds, Sosa, McGwire, Giambi, Clemons, among others bulked up on illegal substances to get ahead of the competition. My piece of mind and the overall safety of the community aren't served by putting Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens behind bars. There are much bigger fish to fry.
It's meant as a deterrent for those that know better and actually think about their actions. You can't deter a crime of passion, an idiot, or someone so desperate that right or wrong makes no difference. If you let those not in that desperate or irrational of a situation willingly commit unethical or illegal acts there's no point in the system to begin with.

Fenway
04-21-2011, 12:54 PM
Bull****, he risks what, a couple months, likely less in any jail? He doesn't forfeit what actually matters to him, the money. Eyes don't lie.

Lying to Congress is even bigger than a Grand Jury - he would do at least 6 months. He turned down a plea that would have kept him out of jail....a very dangerous roll of the dice for him.

daveeym
04-21-2011, 01:32 PM
Lying to Congress is even bigger than a Grand Jury - he would do at least 6 months. He turned down a plea that would have kept him out of jail....a very dangerous roll of the dice for him.

What's dangerous about that? At least six months is nothing but the sentencing guidelines. It doesn't include any plea after the fact or time off for good behavior/jail overcrowding. Put on top of that he's not going to some max security prison but some club fed and what is he risking? A very personal vacation when it comes down to it. He's not risking anything...he's doubling down on great odds.

SI1020
04-21-2011, 02:20 PM
Because the legal system depends in very large part on people understanding that they can't lie under oath. The criminal justice system can't operate under a "cost-effectiveness" strategy, or way too many crimes would go un-prosecuted because it costs more to prosecute than they cost society. Besides, as I've already stated, almost all of those costs already exist, whether Bonds gets prosecuted or not. They didn't go out and hire new people to prosecute the case.

Yes, sometimes I can't help myself, and have to have a little fun with a sentence structure that ends up saying something entirely different than what the poster has in mind. I do it very rarely these days. You're one of the best and usually right, probably on this issue too. Feel free to correct my grammar or tell me I'm full of it. I will continue to hope for in my mind what would be a better allocation of resources targeted against those that do the greatest damage to society. Still, as usual you make a great point, this time about the perjury issue.

SI1020
04-21-2011, 02:32 PM
It's meant as a deterrent for those that know better and actually think about their actions. You can't deter a crime of passion, an idiot, or someone so desperate that right or wrong makes no difference. If you let those not in that desperate or irrational of a situation willingly commit unethical or illegal acts there's no point in the system to begin with. As per my reply to Nellie, yes I concede that very valid and strong point. I just like those cold hard steel bars to clang shut on the most dangerous among us.