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View Full Version : How long does Jackie Robinson Day continue?


pythons007
04-15-2011, 07:36 PM
Watching the White Sox game, I noticed it was Jackie Robinson Day. It got me thinking of how much longer do all players wear the number 42 for the day? I understand what Jackie did for the game and what he had to go through in his playing career. I also know that baseball among all other sports has the most heritage and tradition. Does this become part of that or has it already?

I think sooner or later you're going to get a generation of fans that might not understand the significance of #42.

What's say you?

anewman35
04-15-2011, 07:41 PM
Watching the White Sox game, I noticed it was Jackie Robinson Day. It got me thinking of how much longer do all players wear the number 42 for the day? I understand what Jackie did for the game and what he had to go through in his playing career. I also know that baseball among all other sports has the most heritage and tradition. Does this become part of that or has it already?

I think sooner or later you're going to get a generation of fans that might not understand the significance of #42.

What's say you?

I honestly don't like the idea of everybody wearing #42, but I can't see how they ever end it now without a big backlash. As to your comment that sooner or later people won't understand it, that's sort of the point, I think - they're going to keep doing it so that (at least once a year) it does get discussed and maybe people do understand it.

SephClone89
04-15-2011, 07:54 PM
I honestly don't like the idea of everybody wearing #42, but I can't see how they ever end it now without a big backlash. As to your comment that sooner or later people won't understand it, that's sort of the point, I think - they're going to keep doing it so that (at least once a year) it does get discussed and maybe people do understand it.

Bingo.

GoGoCrede
04-15-2011, 10:34 PM
It better be forever. Robinson's contribution to the game should never be forgotten.

rookie
04-15-2011, 10:55 PM
As long as there is a Baseball Hall of Fame there should be a Jackie Robinson Day. He helps to remind us of those who were denied the opportunity to prove that they belonged. Considering that segregation existed during the lifetime of many people who are still alive and that integration is a relatively new development in our country's race relations, I think it will be more than 50 years before the effects of our country's "original sin" will no longer cease to exist. It's really quite commendable of baseball to publicly acknowledge their role in segregation every year and remind us of the history of desegregation.

(Just watched Soul of the Game for the first time this year. I really enjoyed it. So odd to see Blair Underwood and Isaiah Washington so young.)

sox1970
04-15-2011, 10:59 PM
I like the annual Jackie Robinson Day, but everybody wearing 42 is stupid.

Nellie_Fox
04-15-2011, 11:46 PM
Where's the Minnie Minoso day? The first black latino major leaguer.

Dibbs
04-16-2011, 12:29 AM
All I know is the players should just wear a patch. I really dislike trying to watch the game with everybody wearing number 42.

Medford Bobby
04-16-2011, 08:29 AM
I still feel that Larry Doby is underappriciated by fans and especially by the White Sox...no retirement of his numbers....he is 2sd, but seems a distant second in the breakdown of racial barriers.....:scratch:

DumpJerry
04-16-2011, 09:05 AM
At the game last night, we did have fun saying things like "come on 42, you can do it" and "good play there, 42!"

Lamp81
04-16-2011, 10:54 AM
By the White Sox having a Robinson photo on the outfield wall, I think they are doing enough to keep his contributions to the game remembered.

I do think it is time to do away with the mass wearing of the 42 number. If the Dodgers and the Mets want to wear 42 on April 15th, by all means go ahead. Those are the 2 teams most tied to his leagacy.

gobears1987
04-16-2011, 11:02 AM
Every player wearing 42 is stupid. Honoring Jackie is a noble thing to do, but how many casual fans can tell you today who Larry Doby was or why he was significant? He and others who went through the same challenges Jackie did are forgotten.

I liked what they did 5 years ago when one player from each team wore it for the day. It was meaningful then.

DumpJerry
04-16-2011, 11:02 AM
By the White Sox having a Robinson photo on the outfield wall, I think they are doing enough to keep his contributions to the game remembered.
All MLB stadiums have 42 retired along with their own team's retired numbers.

I don't understand why people are so desirous of phasing out Jackie Robinson Day. The arguments that there are a couple of generations of fans who did not know him make as much sense as getting rid of holidays that remember Presidents who died well over 100 years ago (Washington, Lincoln, etc.).

The wearing of 42 by everyone on one day does not change how the games are played that day or the outcomes of the games. It is part of the game. Plain and simple.

sox1970
04-16-2011, 11:11 AM
All MLB stadiums have 42 retired along with their own team's retired numbers.

I don't understand why people are so desirous of phasing out Jackie Robinson Day. The arguments that there are a couple of generations of fans who did not know him make as much sense as getting rid of holidays that remember Presidents who died well over 100 years ago (Washington, Lincoln, etc.).

The wearing of 42 by everyone on one day does not change how the games are played that day or the outcomes of the games. It is part of the game. Plain and simple.

No, it's still stupid.

April 15th can be Jackie Robinson Day without the overkill of everybody wearing 42.

They can have one player from each team wear 42.
They can have a pregame ceremony in some way with a video.
The broadcasters can talk about it, and who that team's first black player was.

There are many ways of celebrating Jackie Robinson without everyone dressed like Rodney Bolton.

soltrain21
04-16-2011, 11:57 AM
No, it's still stupid.

April 15th can be Jackie Robinson Day without the overkill of everybody wearing 42.

They can have one player from each team wear 42.
They can have a pregame ceremony in some way with a video.
The broadcasters can talk about it, and who that team's first black player was.

There are many ways of celebrating Jackie Robinson without everyone dressed like Rodney Bolton.

I assumed they all wore 42 to show equality/solidarity on the playing field.

rcescato
04-16-2011, 11:58 AM
Watching the White Sox game, I noticed it was Jackie Robinson Day. It got me thinking of how much longer do all players wear the number 42 for the day? I understand what Jackie did for the game and what he had to go through in his playing career. I also know that baseball among all other sports has the most heritage and tradition. Does this become part of that or has it already?

I think sooner or later you're going to get a generation of fans that might not understand the significance of #42.

What's say you?

its overdone now. stop this day or its gonna be like the flubs guest singer for 7th inning stretch

GoGoCrede
04-16-2011, 12:28 PM
its overdone now. stop this day or its gonna be like the flubs guest singer for 7th inning stretch

Honoring a significant player like Jackie is hardly the same as some drunken C-list celeb singing Take Me Out to the Ballgame!!

SephClone89
04-16-2011, 12:32 PM
its overdone now. stop this day or its gonna be like the flubs guest singer for 7th inning stretch

:rolleyes:

WhiteSox5187
04-16-2011, 01:07 PM
It is impossible to describe the impact that Jackie had not just on baseball but on the US as a whole. My ONLY objection to Jackie Robinson day is that it is near impossible to figure out who is who if you are watching the game in the stands. I knew who everyone for the White Sox was, but if the Angels pinch ran or made a pitching change for another right handed white guy with Weaver on the mound and I didn't hear or see the announcement I was going to miss it, same with pinch hitters or pinch runners.

Fenway
04-16-2011, 01:18 PM
http://blogs.umass.edu/bikehara/files/2010/09/Fenway8.jpg

Do the Cubs fly a 42 flag for Robinson? - I can't recall it.

TDog
04-16-2011, 01:18 PM
It is impossible to describe the impact that Jackie had not just on baseball but on the US as a whole. My ONLY objection to Jackie Robinson day is that it is near impossible to figure out who is who if you are watching the game in the stands. I knew who everyone for the White Sox was, but if the Angels pinch ran or made a pitching change for another right handed white guy with Weaver on the mound and I didn't hear or see the announcement I was going to miss it, same with pinch hitters or pinch runners.

If you're watching the out-of-town scoreboard in a lot of parks, you can't tell if there is a pitching change in a game you're interested in, but that might be irrelevant because you can't tell who is pitching in the first place. I haven't been to Wrigley Field for about 40 years, but they had their own numbering system for pitchers that didn't use uniform numbers, and newer scoreboards have the ability to use names (I haven't been to any such parks, though).

It is rather like having no numbers at all, as was the case in baseball before the 1920s (why Ed Walsh doesn't have his number retired).

Still, you can't overstate the importance of Jackie Robinson to baseball and America. The importance of the tribute justifies the inconvenience.

fram40
04-16-2011, 02:30 PM
As long as there is a Baseball Hall of Fame there should be a Jackie Robinson Day. He helps to remind us of those who were denied the opportunity to prove that they belonged. Considering that segregation existed during the lifetime of many people who are still alive and that integration is a relatively new development in our country's race relations, I think it will be more than 50 years before the effects of our country's "original sin" will no longer cease to exist. It's really quite commendable of baseball to publicly acknowledge their role in segregation every year and remind us of the history of desegregation.

It is also a chance for MLB to remind us all of its role - even if relatively insignificant - in helping to right this country's "original sin".

Fenway
04-16-2011, 02:54 PM
I just wish Larry Doby would get his due.


The AL was a seperate enity back then.......and from all accounts Washington was not kind to black players at the beginning.

Boston wasn't so warm and fuzzy either. Even the Negro Leagues avoided ( or were not allowed ) in either Fenway or Braves Field.

I just find it ASTOUNDING that the Boston Bruins had a black player before the Red Sox.

http://myhero.com/images/guest/g29103/hero27279/g29103_u28177_oree_willie02.jpg

SI1020
04-16-2011, 03:04 PM
I just wish Larry Doby would get his due.


The AL was a seperate enity back then.......and from all accounts Washington was not kind to black players at the beginning.

Boston wasn't so warm and fuzzy either. Even the Negro Leagues avoided ( or were not allowed ) in either Fenway or Braves Field.

I just find it ASTOUNDING that the Boston Bruins had a black player before the Red Sox.

http://myhero.com/images/guest/g29103/hero27279/g29103_u28177_oree_willie02.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_O%27Ree

Fenway
04-16-2011, 03:09 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_O%27Ree

From all accounts Willie was treated well by the Boston fans....years later it was discovered he was blind in one eye but he never told anyone otherwise he would never get a chance.

Willie played in 1958.....Pumpsie Green finally arrived in 1959.

DSpivack
04-16-2011, 03:11 PM
From all accounts Willie was treated well by the Boston fans....years later it was discovered he was blind in one eye but he never told anyone otherwise he would never get a chance.

Willie played in 1958.....Pumpsie Green finally arrived in 1959.

Red Sox were last team to integrate?

Fenway
04-16-2011, 03:20 PM
Red Sox were last team to integrate?

1959

It is bad enough they had Jackie for a tryout at Fenway and the Boston Globe reported that a team official ( believed to be Joe Cronin ) ended the tryout by yelling - Get those n****** off the field :o:

WORSE - scout George Digby signed a Birmingham player and Boston told him to pay him but rip the contract up....

Willie Mays :whiner:

As late as 1991 they still had players race on the scout forms.

SI1020
04-16-2011, 03:21 PM
Red Sox were last team to integrate?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_first_black_Major_League_Baseball_players_ by_team_and_date

Fenway
04-16-2011, 03:29 PM
I met George Digby in Winter Haven - he told me flat out he had Mays name on a contract.

The team denied that was the case.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_J._Digby


Mays, Williams and Jensen as OF :whiner:

The sad story of Jackie in Boston
'
http://books.google.com/books?id=ToQk9tq0ySAC&pg=PA242&lpg=PA242&dq=red+sox+tryout+jackie+robinson+get+those+****** s&source=bl&ots=01F2muA195&sig=TU-GeGMqQj

DSpivack
04-16-2011, 03:56 PM
1959

It is bad enough they had Jackie for a tryout at Fenway and the Boston Globe reported that a team official ( believed to be Joe Cronin ) ended the tryout by yelling - Get those n****** off the field :o:

WORSE - scout George Digby signed a Birmingham player and Boston told him to pay him but rip the contract up....

Willie Mays :whiner:

As late as 1991 they still had players race on the scout forms.

Wow that's unconscionable.

Fenway
04-16-2011, 04:19 PM
Wow that's unconscionable.

The Globe made a big deal out of it and the Red Sox response was

Well we having been using the same forms for years.

Racism existed until Harrington finally sold and the new owners cleaned house.

Soxfest
04-16-2011, 04:49 PM
I still feel that Larry Doby is underappriciated by fans and especially by the White Sox...no retirement of his numbers....he is 2sd, but seems a distant second in the breakdown of racial barriers.....:scratch:

Exactly he is a foot note.

Red Barchetta
04-16-2011, 05:18 PM
Honoring a significant player like Jackie is hardly the same as some drunken C-list celeb singing Take Me Out to the Ballgame!!

...what do you have against Jim Belushi?! :tongue:

Regarding Jackie Robinson, I think the tradition will go on as it represents the breaking of the color barrier in MLB. The fact that he was a great player also helps! :cool:

I don't really care if one or all of the players where #42. I remember the first time they did it, I turned on the SOX game and saw a player with #42 and thought "Wow! The SOX removed the names on the back of their jerseys!". :rolleyes: Then I realized what day it was and why everyone was wearing the same number. :redface:

geofitz
04-16-2011, 05:38 PM
Keep Jackie Robinson Day. Have one player wear #42 as an honor. Have another wear the # of the first black player on that particular team. And progress one # per year for about ten years or so. Repeat. That would recognize the group to follow Robinson.

BTW, I had the privilege of meeting Larry Doby at an FSL game in West Palm Beach. A true gentleman.

TDog
04-16-2011, 05:48 PM
I still feel that Larry Doby is underappriciated by fans and especially by the White Sox...no retirement of his numbers....he is 2sd, but seems a distant second in the breakdown of racial barriers.....:scratch:

Minnie Minoso broke the White Sox color barrier. (I've heard some say Sam Hairston a few weeks later technically broke the White Sox color barrier because Minoso was Cuban, but that argument isn't important here.) Minoso's number is retired. Larry Doby played less than three seasons for the White Sox later in the 1950s. Doby was the first black White Sox manager, but he didn't manage very long or well. Doby was one of three African-Americans who debuted in the American League in July 1947, something that's also forgotten.

Doby wasn't signed by the Indians until July 1947. He wouldn't have be signed by the Indians if Jackie Robinson (who was signed by the Dodgers before the 1946 season and sent to play that year in Montreal, something all of baseball knew and The Sporting News editorialized against) had not debuted in April and made it clear that integrating major league baseball wasn't going to be a failed experiment of a bleeding-heart intellectual Northeasterner intent on social engineering. As impressive as Doby's achievements were, they don't come close to equalling Jackie Robinson's.

I don't believe Larry Doby's White Sox number is worthy of retirement by the White Sox. As incredible a tribute as retiring a number through all of baseball is, I don't see Doby being worthy of the same honor. The man who was major league baseball's second African-American player and second African-American manager has a Robinson preceding him to thank for his opportunities.

Fenway
04-16-2011, 05:51 PM
BTW The Red Sox choose Comiskey to finally intergrate.

http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1959/B07210CHA1959.htm


His old high school teammate welcomed him - Jim Landis

http://www.baseballsavvy.com/archive/w_pumpsie.html

TommyJohn
04-16-2011, 06:16 PM
BTW The Red Sox choose Comiskey to finally intergrate.

http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1959/B07210CHA1959.htm


His old high school teammate welcomed him - Jim Landis

http://www.baseballsavvy.com/archive/w_pumpsie.html

Three team color barriers were broken in Comiskey Park:

Larry Doby, July 5, 1947
Minnie Minoso May 1, 1951
Pumpsie Green July 21, 1959

I love digging into trivia for stuff like this, too. Here's a couple of nuggets:

Minnie Minoso cracked the White Sox color barrier with a home run in his first at-bat. Mickey Mantle hit his first major league home run in the same game.

Curt Roberts, the first black member of the Pittsburgh Pirates, made his ML debut against a white pitcher with the same last name-Robin Roberts of the Philadelphia Phillies.

Hank Thompson integrated two teams-The St. Louis Browns and the New York Giants.

Three of baseball's "first" black players are enshrined in the Hall of Fame-Jackie Robinson, Larry Doby, and Ernie Banks.

There is a great pic out there of Larry Doby decking Art Ditmar as the umpire tries to intervene, it was the punch that ignited the Sox-Yankees brawl of 1957. I hae searched the net over for that pic and cannot find it. I'd love to have a copy.

TDog
04-16-2011, 06:44 PM
...

Three of baseball's "first" black players are enshrined in the Hall of Fame-Jackie Robinson, Larry Doby, and Ernie Banks.
...

You left out Henry Aaron, Elston Howard and Monte Irvin, who debuted for Giants the same day as Hank Thompson debuted for the Giants. Willard Brown, who debuted for the Browns two days after Hank Thompson, was named to the Hall of Fame in a vote that many here believed should have led to Minnie Minoso's induction.

Considering that 16 major league teams were segregated, that's a fairly high percentage.

TommyJohn
04-16-2011, 10:09 PM
You left out Henry Aaron, Elston Howard and Monte Irvin, who debuted for Giants the same day as Hank Thompson debuted for the Giants. Willard Brown, who debuted for the Browns two days after Hank Thompson, was named to the Hall of Fame in a vote that many here believed should have led to Minnie Minoso's induction.

Considering that 16 major league teams were segregated, that's a fairly high percentage.

Hank Aaron did not break the Braves color barrier, that was Sam Jethroe. Irvin made his debut the same day as Thompson, however Thompson started the game and Irvin entered it later as a pinch hitter, so Thompson gets the credit as the first black Giant. Willard Brown debuted two days after Thompson, and thus was not the first black St. Louis Browns player. And Elston Howard is not in the Hall of Fame.

GoGoCrede
04-16-2011, 10:49 PM
As late as 1991 they still had players race on the scout forms.

Wow, that is just awful.

Fenway
04-17-2011, 12:41 AM
Wow, that is just awful.

The Yawkey-Haywood-Buddy-Harrington ownership was really a Mom and Pop operation. The minor leagues were run for years by a man and then his son took over. Was Yawkey a bigot? ( most likely ) but Joe Cronin and Mike Higgins certainly were.

TDog
04-17-2011, 02:05 AM
Hank Aaron did not break the Braves color barrier, that was Sam Jethroe. Irvin made his debut the same day as Thompson, however Thompson started the game and Irvin entered it later as a pinch hitter, so Thompson gets the credit as the first black Giant. Willard Brown debuted two days after Thompson, and thus was not the first black St. Louis Browns player. And Elston Howard is not in the Hall of Fame.


I was confusing the Hall of Fame with retired numbers and really, one would think that a Yankee with a number retired would be in the Halll of Fame. My apologies. When I lived in suburban Milwaukee, the Brewers honored Henry Aaron and credited him with breaking the Braves' color barrier. At last summer's ceremonies retiring Monte Irvin's number with the Giants, he was credited with breaking the Giants color barrier. And he didn't protest.

Somewhere, I have a baseball on which I have Monte Irvin's, Bob Gibson's and Bob Feller's autographs. But I digress.

Individual team color barriers, which have a few ambiguities, don't approach with the importance of Jackie Robinson.