PDA

View Full Version : The Greatest Pitcher You've Never Heard Of


bnlfanmatt
03-27-2011, 11:36 PM
Well, maybe someone here has...

Mod edit: posting even a portion of an article is a violation of the posting rules.

The Greatest Pitcher You've Never Heard Of (http://www.thepostgame.com/features/201103/greatest-pitcher-youve-never-heard)

I also find it interesting that the White Sox were involved, although they didn't let him sign too many young black players. They did recently buy him a head stone, which makes me proud of this organizations commitment to players and personnel of years past. :smile:

spawn
03-28-2011, 08:06 AM
That's a great story. This is the first time I'd ever heard of him.

SI1020
03-28-2011, 08:27 AM
Unfortunately the old Negro Leagues kept very incomplete records. Additionally comparatively few of their games were "official". I got out my old Baseball Encyclopedia which has over 3000 pages and in the Negro Leagues section there are no stats for him. It would be a painstaking process but I wish baseball historians would provide us more complete records of these mostly forgotten baseball players.

Lip Man 1
03-28-2011, 11:34 AM
On a related note, I thought I had read or heard here at WSI something about the Sox being in on Jackie Robinson?

I remember being amazed when I saw it. Does anybody else recall the same thing?

I know the Sox and Dodgers were the only two teams making a pitch to get Fernando back in the late 70's.

Lip

bnlfanmatt
03-28-2011, 07:57 PM
On a related note, I thought I had read or heard here at WSI something about the Sox being in on Jackie Robinson?

I remember being amazed when I saw it. Does anybody else recall the same thing?

I know the Sox and Dodgers were the only two teams making a pitch to get Fernando back in the late 70's.

Lip


Looks like it's true. (http://mbd.scout.com/mb.aspx?s=261&f=3083&t=269711) 1942 would've been a lot earlier than when he actually did get to the majors in '47.

TDog
03-29-2011, 11:30 AM
Unfortunately the old Negro Leagues kept very incomplete records. Additionally comparatively few of their games were "official". I got out my old Baseball Encyclopedia which has over 3000 pages and in the Negro Leagues section there are no stats for him. It would be a painstaking process but I wish baseball historians would provide us more complete records of these mostly forgotten baseball players.

In the 1970s, Robert Peterson wrote Only the Ball Was White, which, at the time, was the definitive Negro Leagues history. He did painstaking research, but in many cases records don't exist because no one was keeping them. When things weren't written down, they were only recalled in oral tradition, which sometimes varied from teller to teller.

I bought the book when it first came out in hardback and used it as a source for a college history paper in the summer of 1975, I think. I have no idea where it is now. Fortunately, the book is still in print and is out in paperback. It has probably been through one or two revisions.

bnlfanmatt
03-29-2011, 08:05 PM
In the 1970s, Robert Peterson wrote Only the Ball Was White, which, at the time, was the definitive Negro Leagues history.

I went to look at this book, because it might be interesting. Amazon has it, and it's good to know that it's the 12th best seller in the Books- Literature & Fiction- Classics- Medieval category. :scratch: