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View Full Version : TED WILLIAMS--dead at 83


oldcomiskey
07-05-2002, 12:48 PM
so long Teddy

CerberusWG
07-05-2002, 12:50 PM
83 is a damn good number to die at. Hope you had a good life Ted, thanks for all the great seasons!

RedPinStripes
07-05-2002, 12:51 PM
So long Ted. Wish i was around to see you hit.

Lucky_Boys143035
07-05-2002, 12:52 PM
Sad to hear it, he gave many years of his career to serve in the army. The Ted Williams museum in Hernando Florida is great. C ya Teddy Ballgame
:whiner: :whiner: :whiner: :whiner: :whiner: :whiner: :whiner:

TheBigHurt
07-05-2002, 12:54 PM
anyone have anyother information on this? This is the first i heard of Ted passing away.

I wish i could of saw you play, TED

RIP Ted Williams

:whiner:

idseer
07-05-2002, 01:00 PM
he had the most beautiful swing i've ever seen, and the best nickname i've ever heard. the splendid splinter!

see ya teddy!

RKMeibalane
07-05-2002, 01:00 PM
This is yet, another sad day for baseball. Ted Williams was a truly special person who always strove to better himself, both on the field and off. He will be missed.

Conehead
07-05-2002, 01:12 PM
R.I.P. Ted

http://espn.go.com/classic/obit/williams_ted_obit.html

delben91
07-05-2002, 01:25 PM
RIP Ted. Wish I could've seen you play. The stories I hear about your swing are, like you were, splendid.

FarmerAndy
07-05-2002, 01:29 PM
A sad day indeed. Ted Williams was always my favorite player to read about. Having been born 15 years after Ted's playing career ended, I've always felt that I really missed out on something by not having been able to see him play.


Thank you Ted Williams. R.I.P.

Nick@Nite
07-05-2002, 01:35 PM
How the Thumper could win TWO TRIPLE CROWN's , and not be awarded the MVP, has to be planet Earth's greatest unsolved mystery.

Ted Williams... American Patriot and the greatest hitter of all-time.

RIP

FanOf14
07-05-2002, 01:44 PM
I wish players of today would take a page out of his book.

RIP Ted

doublem23
07-05-2002, 02:02 PM
Never again will the world see such a pretty swing...

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20020705/capt.1025888813.obit_williams_ny9.jpg

RIP, Ted.

WinningUgly!
07-05-2002, 02:59 PM
Last man to hit .400...we'll never see that again. RIP Teddy Ballgame.

TornLabrum
07-05-2002, 03:08 PM
Ted Williams is the best hitter I ever saw. He'll be missed.

Rest in peace, Ted.

doublem23
07-05-2002, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by WinningUgly!
Last man to hit .400...we'll never see that again.

http://seattle.mariners.mlb.com/sea/photo/ph_play_mugshot_400085.jpg
You sure about that?

No disrespect intended to Ted Williams, but I'm willing to bet Ichiro will hit for .400 sooner or later.

Foulke You
07-05-2002, 03:43 PM
When I was at Fenway in May for the ChiSox/BoSox series, I took the Fenway tour and they pointed out a painted red seat in the RF Granstand which is where the longest HR in Fenway history was hit. It was hit by the great Ted Williams. Legend has it, Williams saw a Yankee fan with a big straw hat who was falling asleep out there way up in RF and he decided to aim for the RF seats. As the story goes, the ball went right through the straw hat and knocked it clear off his head and landed on the now painted red seat. I found the attached story hard to believe (not the homer but the hat story) but the Fenway employee assured me that there was a documented story in the Boston Globe complete with a picture of the guy holding up his broken straw hat. That seat was a million miles from home plate and was absolutely awe inspiring that a guy could hit it that far. It was over 500 feet, easy. R.I.P Ted Williams.

Dadawg_77
07-05-2002, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by Foulke You
When I was at Fenway in May for the ChiSox/BoSox series, I took the Fenway tour and they pointed out a painted red seat in the RF Granstand which is where the longest HR in Fenway history was hit. It was hit by the great Ted Williams. Legend has it, Williams saw a Yankee fan with a big straw hat who was falling asleep out there way up in RF and he decided to aim for the RF seats. As the story goes, the ball went right through the straw hat and knocked it clear off his head and landed on the now painted red seat. I found the attached story hard to believe (not the homer but the hat story) but the Fenway employee assured me that there was a documented story in the Boston Globe complete with a picture of the guy holding up his broken straw hat. That seat was a million miles from home plate and was absolutely awe inspiring that a guy could hit it that far. It was over 500 feet, easy. R.I.P Ted Williams.

It stories like this that make baseball. While I am to young to ever have experience Ted Williams bat live, I knew the stories (wouldn't accept .3995 and so forth), saw the video tape (that swing was sweet). But then again stories and legends are what connect us, the current generation of fans, to baseball's great past and no other sport has it. That is why Baseball is America pastime, and today America lost a little bit of its past time but the memories, stories, and legends will live on.

Keep pulling the ball from up there Ted, maybe you'll could win a MVP from Joe up there.

oldcomiskey
07-05-2002, 04:48 PM
and he could see the bat hit the ball

Paulwny
07-05-2002, 06:05 PM
I heard this one today. After reg. bp Williams would pay $50 (it was the 40's) for 50 pitches to the red sox pitcher whose delivery most resembled that days opposing pitcher. He wanted a variety of pitches thrown because he felt batting practice fast balls were great for loosening up and nothing else.
Adios Ted

Spiff
07-05-2002, 07:03 PM
He was an icon and the way the fans treated him toward the end of his career was awful.

Dadawg_77
07-05-2002, 07:12 PM
Originally posted by Spiff
He was an icon and the way the fans treated him toward the end of his career was awful.

Ever wonder if Barry Bonds will become our Ted Williams in about 40 years?

Paulwny
07-05-2002, 07:19 PM
Originally posted by Spiff
He was an icon and the way the fans treated him toward the end of his career was awful.

It was the bosox fans who had a love/hate relationship with Williams. The majority of fans outside of Boston respected Williams for his accomplishments.

Mathew
07-05-2002, 07:26 PM
He was an icon and the way the fans treated him toward the end of his career was awful.


Originally posted by Paulwny


It was the bosox fans who had a love/hate relationship with Williams. The majority of fans outside of Boston respected Williams for his accomplishments.


Not to say Frank is close to Ted but, does this sound familiar Sox fans

Spiff
07-05-2002, 07:34 PM
Originally posted by Paulwny


It was the bosox fans who had a love/hate relationship with Williams. The majority of fans outside of Boston respected Williams for his accomplishments.

That's what I meant.

ISUSoxfan
07-05-2002, 07:54 PM
Ted Williams is probably the greatest hitter of all time. He could have accomplished even more in baseball, but he put his career on hold and his life on the line to fight for America. Ted Williams is a baseball legend and an American hero. That story about the guy with the straw hat is amazing. I never saw Williams play baseball live, but I have seen his effect on the game by watching players like Tony Gweyn who learned from him. As big as Williams' accomplishments in baseball were, his biggest contribution to America was his work as a fighter pilot. I will be forever greatful to Ted Williams for shooting down so many Nazis and Communists that I was able to be born into a peaceful Demomcracy. Thank you Ted Williams, and rest in peace.

Nick@Nite
07-05-2002, 10:47 PM
My favorite Ted Williams story, which I read from Jay Johnstone's book, "Temporary Insanity", is as follows...

In 1955, a young Cleveland pitcher named Hank Aguirre is called up from there farm system. The Tribe is in the middle of a pennant race, and young Hank joins the team at Fenway Park.

During the game, Aguirre comes in to face the great Ted Williams. He strikes him out on three pitches. The next inning, Ralph Kiner hits a grand slam, and the Tribe wins an important road game while Aguirre is credited with the win.

Young Hank Aguirre is thrilled. He see's his first major league ball park, get's his first victory as a major league pitcher, and whiffs the greatest hitter of all time. After the game, he approaches Williams and sheepishly asks the great hitter if he'd autograph the ball he pitched to strike him out with. Ted Williams complies with the request.

The following week the Red Sox are in Cleveland, and Hank Aguirre is again called in to face Ted Williams. The Thumper lines Aguirre's first pitch just inside the right field foul pole for a giant home run. Williams goes into his home run trot.

As Williams is rounding first base, he turns to Aguirre and yells, "hey Kid, go get that ball and I'll sign it too."

WinningUgly!
07-05-2002, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by doublem23


http://seattle.mariners.mlb.com/sea/photo/ph_play_mugshot_400085.jpg
You sure about that?

No disrespect intended to Ted Williams, but I'm willing to bet Ichiro will hit for .400 sooner or later.

I'll take your money. :D:

Viva Magglio
07-05-2002, 11:51 PM
This year has been a tough losing streak. First, we lose Jack Buck. And then we lose Darryl Kile the day after Mr. Buck was laid to rest. Now today, we lose Teddy Ballgame. This is a losing streak we all want to see come to an end.

DVG
07-06-2002, 06:51 AM
Originally posted by oldcomiskey
so long Teddy


Somewhere in this great land, Luis Castillo and many other of
today's baseball greats are gazing heavenward and saying to
themselves "who the hell is Ted Williams?"

voodoochile
07-06-2002, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by DVG



Somewhere in this great land, Luis Castillo and many other of
today's baseball greats are gazing heavenward and saying to
themselves "who the hell is Ted Williams?"

:shammy
"That's too bad... I loved 'Cheers'. It was my all time favorite show. That Ted guy always made me laugh. He was the best bartender ever, and man he could get girls like nobody else - except for ShamMEMEME of course..."