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View Full Version : First World Series game ever in Milwaukee online (complete broadcast)


Fenway
03-05-2011, 06:18 PM
The company that owns TVS Sports ( that Eddie Einhorn started ) has a website with some classic television broadcasts that are complete.

No way to post a direct link but if you go here

http://www.tvssports.com/tv.cfm

and scroll down to baseball it will offer you Game 3 of the 1957 World Series as NBC showed it. Mel Allen starts the broadcast gushing about the good people of Sturtevant, Wisconsin who greeted the Yankees TRAIN arrival.

It also has a 1969 Flubs-Phillies game at Wrigley for some reason. The Kubek-Leo Durocher interview at the beginning is interesting. Gowdy leads off by saying the Flubs have had a bad week.

Ton of old classic college hoop games are also online.

Brian26
03-05-2011, 06:34 PM
I just clicked on the '91 Arena game between the Chicago Bruisers and Maryland. I think it's the Cap Center, but not sure. The attendance looks to be...well, there might be more people logged into WSI now than were in attendance that night.

Lip Man 1
03-05-2011, 06:58 PM
I coverered both those 78 Kansas / Kentucky and UNLV / Kentucky games.

Lip

SephClone89
03-05-2011, 07:58 PM
Awesome.

I thought it was great during the Berra AB in the first inning when they switched to the center field cam. Allen says something about "with this view, we can see how the hitter looks from the pitcher's view. We can see just from Buhl's perspective what it's like to look down the barrel of Yogi Berra."

When did the center-field cam become standard? Late 60s?

Fenway
03-05-2011, 08:02 PM
Awesome.

I thought it was great during the Berra AB in the first inning when they switched to the center field cam. Allen says something about "with this view, we can see how the hitter looks from the pitcher's view. We can see just from Buhl's perspective what it's like to look down the barrel of Yogi Berra."

When did the center-field cam become standard? Late 60s?

On a local level the early 60's as most local stations remote the trucks were only built for 3 cameras and the cost of the zoom needed in those days was very expensive.

NBC baseball director, the late Harry Coyle (http://www.sportsvideo.org/portal/hof/articles/publish/Harry_Coyle.shtml), wrote the book that we all still use today. No reason to change from it ( but FOX keeps trying :angry: )

More on Harry here
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/topic/article/Harry_Coyle/1900-01-01/2100-12-31/mdd/index.htm

Fenway
03-06-2011, 11:07 AM
Here are some of Harry's rules - that are in a 10 page book I was given by NBC 30 years ago...

Don't cut to a tight shot of the runner on a play at the plate. Real fans want to see plays, not portraits, so show them a wide shot of the runner racing the ball, not just a closeup of the runner's glorious upper torso.

Don't chop up a double play by clipping from a tight shot of the putout at second to another tight shot of the putout at first. Keep the cameras on the flight of the ball, not on the runners. Otherwise, no one will see an overthrow except the people in the stands.

Don't sacrifice action elsewhere just to document the fact that a runner is crossing the plate.


White Sox fans have been well served by Jim Angio - who is one of the best.

http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/49136_1367104884_7262_n.jpg

He never followed Arne Harris's lead in making babecam a part of baseball telecasts.

Vernam
03-07-2011, 10:52 AM
Thanks, Fenway, my screen and eyes may never recover from that web design. It was like someone vomited HTML. :puking: So that's how websites looked in the late 1950s? :redneck Still, I must admit the variety is weirdly impressive.

Vernam

michned
03-08-2011, 10:12 PM
I love the roller derby video...with a young Chet Coppock no less.

LITTLE NELL
03-09-2011, 06:21 AM
Who would have thought that in less than 10 years after that World Series the Braves would be moving to Atlanta, what a crime.
I still wish the Braves had won their playoff against the Dodgers in 59 so they could have met our White Sox in the WS.

Fenway
03-09-2011, 07:01 AM
Who would have thought that in less than 10 years after that World Series the Braves would be moving to Atlanta, what a crime.
I still wish the Braves had won their playoff against the Dodgers in 59 so they could have met our White Sox in the WS.

and they were only 5 years removed from Boston....

Lou Perini bought full control of the Braves in 1951 for $500,000 and sold them 10 years later for ten times that. He did write that William Bartholomay double-crossed him as he wanted the team to stay in Milwaukee.

ComiskeyBrewer
03-10-2011, 08:57 PM
and they were only 5 years removed from Boston....

Lou Perini bought full control of the Braves in 1951 for $500,000 and sold them 10 years later for ten times that. He did write that William Bartholomay double-crossed him as he wanted the team to stay in Milwaukee.

Yep, Bartholomay had NO intentions of keeping the team in Milwaukee. He wanted to move them to Atlanta no matter what. Bartholomay is pretty much the reason why attendance dropped in the 60s(he stopped letting people bring in beer, unheard of at the time).

I actually wonder what would have been had one of two things happened:

1. The Braves stayed in Milwaukee

2. The Boston Braves stayed in Boston, and allowed the Stl Browns(the original Milwaukee Brewers), to move back.

Either way, it would be interesting. I'm just happy we have a team here NOW. :rolleyes:

Fenway
03-10-2011, 09:11 PM
Perini says he wished that he had accepted Tom Yawkey's offer to share Fenway Park and then work to build a new ballpark together...

Of course then we would have had something like this

http://www.stadiumpage.com/stpages/soxdome.html

The Braves were an up and coming team and Eddie Mathews and Hank Aaron would have feasted at Fenway....

Perini was having major cash problems with his contruction company in the late 50's into the early 60's - his company was building both the Massachusetts Turnpike and the Callahan Tunnel and he had cash flow problems.

Who knows - Yawkey owned Minneapolis and may have moved the Red Sox there....and the Twins never would have happened.

Yep, Bartholomay had NO intentions of keeping the team in Milwaukee. He wanted to move them to Atlanta no matter what. Bartholomay is pretty much the reason why attendance dropped in the 60s(he stopped letting people bring in beer, unheard of at the time).

I actually wonder what would have been had one of two things happened:

1. The Braves stayed in Milwaukee

2. The Boston Braves stayed in Boston, and allowed the Stl Browns(the original Milwaukee Brewers), to move back.

Either way, it would be interesting. I'm just happy we have a team here NOW. :rolleyes:

Hitmen77
03-11-2011, 10:47 AM
Who would have thought that in less than 10 years after that World Series the Braves would be moving to Atlanta, what a crime.
I still wish the Braves had won their playoff against the Dodgers in 59 so they could have met our White Sox in the WS.

The Braves leaving Milwaukee does sound like a travesty. They were very successful and popular in Milwaukee. They had a winning record every single season they were in Milwaukee. Not only did Milwaukee fans lose the Braves, they lost the future HR king right in his prime.

The Braves beating the Dodgers in 59 would have made for a very interesting Chicago-Milwaukee World Series.

Yep, Bartholomay had NO intentions of keeping the team in Milwaukee. He wanted to move them to Atlanta no matter what. Bartholomay is pretty much the reason why attendance dropped in the 60s(he stopped letting people bring in beer, unheard of at the time).

I actually wonder what would have been had one of two things happened:

1. The Braves stayed in Milwaukee

2. The Boston Braves stayed in Boston, and allowed the Stl Browns(the original Milwaukee Brewers), to move back.

Either way, it would be interesting. I'm just happy we have a team here NOW. :rolleyes:

Some of those moves in the 50s and 60s set off chain reactions for future expansion and potential moves. The Braves leaving Milwaukee made Milwaukee a prime destination for the troubled Pilots, which led to Seattle suing MLB. That first led to efforts to move the Sox to Seattle and then finally to the 1977 expansion that gave us the Mariners and Blue Jays.

The A's moving from K.C. set off a scramble too. Because of this, MLB had to rush expansion to 1969 because Missouri senators were threatening to get MLB's anti-trust exemption revoked over the A's move and didn't want to wait until the early 70s - which was when MLB was planning to next expand. Perhaps the Pilots fiasco would have been avoided if MLB didn't rush to add 4 new teams.

Perini says he wished that he had accepted Tom Yawkey's offer to share Fenway Park and then work to build a new ballpark together...

Of course then we would have had something like this

http://www.stadiumpage.com/stpages/soxdome.html

The Braves were an up and coming team and Eddie Mathews and Hank Aaron would have feasted at Fenway....

Perini was having major cash problems with his contruction company in the late 50's into the early 60's - his company was building both the Massachusetts Turnpike and the Callahan Tunnel and he had cash flow problems.

Who knows - Yawkey owned Minneapolis and may have moved the Red Sox there....and the Twins never would have happened.

If the Braves had hung on to Boston until they became an NL powerhouse a few years later, who knows, it could very well be that the Red Sox ended up moving. It's hard to imagine today with the Red Sox being a runaway success, but it was very possible back in the 50s or early 60s.

If that had happen, you'd have a very different set of dynamics today without the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry taking center stage in MLB coverage.

I don't think Boston would have hung on as a 2-team MLB city all the way through today. Though, I think today it could easily support the Red Sox and Braves if both had managed to hang on until the MLB revenue and attendance boom took off in the 1990s.

Actually, of all the original multi-team cities, only St. Louis seems obvious as no longer being able to support 2 teams. Today, I could see Boston and even Philadelphia supporting 2 teams. Also, the NY metro area could easily support a 3rd team.