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View Full Version : Frank's Twin aka Jeff Bagwell Talks About His Career, Steroids, the HOF, etc.


RKMeibalane
12-29-2010, 04:23 PM
Link (http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/hof11/columns/story?columnist=crasnick_jerry&id=5963276)

LoveYourSuit
12-29-2010, 06:49 PM
I don't get the title of this thread.

Reading at first I thought Frank Thomas, then the Minnesota Twins:scratch:


Is it Frank Thomas because they were both born on the same day?

Madvora
12-29-2010, 07:39 PM
It's fine if you want to defend yourself, but you're not making yourself look good by defending Bonds, McGwire and Pettitte and also saying there's nothing wrong with what they were doing.

RKMeibalane
12-29-2010, 08:16 PM
I don't get the title of this thread.

Reading at first I thought Frank Thomas, then the Minnesota Twins:scratch:


Is it Frank Thomas because they were both born on the same day?

Yes, it is in reference to Bagwell and Thomas sharing a birthday.

russ99
12-29-2010, 09:54 PM
It's fine if you want to defend yourself, but you're not making yourself look good by defending Bonds, McGwire and Pettitte and also saying there's nothing wrong with what they were doing.

He didn't say there was nothing wrong with what they were doing, but based on their short careers he understood why they did it.

Too many people are lumping Bagwell in with the cheats with no proof other than blind assumption due to the facts that he lifted weights and hit lots of home runs.

They'll probably do this to Hurt too at some point.

Daver
12-29-2010, 10:14 PM
They'll probably do this to Hurt too at some point.

Nope.

He was one of the first to step up and make a stand, he welcomed testing, and freely offered to give a blood test as opposed to a urine test, and he welcomed Olympic style testing.

He was also one of the few that was willing to appear before congress and testify against doping in baseball.

Anyone that wants to accuse Frank Thomas of doping has a hill that reaches to the moon to climb to make it stick.

spawn
12-29-2010, 10:25 PM
Nope.

He was one of the first to step up and make a stand, he welcomed testing, and freely offered to give a blood test as opposed to a urine test, and he welcomed Olympic style testing.

He was also one of the few that was willing to appear before congress and testify against doping in baseball.

Anyone that wants to accuse Frank Thomas of doping has a hill that reaches to the moon to climb to make it stick.
Amen. He was pretty vocal his entire career regarding steroids and about testing. My memory is a little fuzzy, but I think he was ridiculed by some press members because of this.

SephClone89
12-29-2010, 10:41 PM
Thread title is unnecessarily confusing.

Nellie_Fox
12-30-2010, 12:27 AM
Thread title is unnecessarily confusing.I understood it just fine.

LoveYourSuit
12-30-2010, 12:53 AM
Amen. He was pretty vocal his entire career regarding steroids and about testing. My memory is a little fuzzy, but I think he was ridiculed by some press members because of this.


Steroids cost Thomas at least one additional MVP and perhaps about $50 million for his career.

God bless him for taking the honest road.

And great for us fans he was our guy.

Very sad that a good amount of fans and the media did not appreciate this guy. IMO he walks right next to Walter Payton and Michael Jordan for this town.

Nellie_Fox
12-30-2010, 01:20 AM
IMO he walks right next to Walter Payton and Michael Jordan for this town.You have to include Ernie Banks in that list. No matter what you think of the Cubs, you just can't hate Ernie.

Madvora
12-30-2010, 07:37 AM
He didn't say there was nothing wrong with what they were doing, but based on their short careers he understood why they did it.
He's actually says, "I have no problem with that." It's the same thing as saying "there's nothing wrong with that."
I probably can't quote directly because of copyright issues, but look at his quotes starting with: "You know how I feel about it, truthfully?..."
It's right in the middle.

The point is that he's justifying other people cheating, which is not a good way to make a case for yourself and convince people you didn't cheat yourself.
I don't know either way, but I'm just saying that he's taking an odd approach to this.

Foulke You
12-30-2010, 06:09 PM
Amen. He was pretty vocal his entire career regarding steroids and about testing. My memory is a little fuzzy, but I think he was ridiculed by some press members because of this.
Your memory is not fuzzy. Frank made a comment about steroids in 1998 talking about how he felt "something was going on" and that his numbers were at the top of the league when he started and now he was just an ordinary power hitter. Many in the local media (including a former Sun Times columnist who shall remain nameless) lashed out at Frank saying that he was just "jealous" of Sammy Sosa's accomplishments and fame. Frank was right all along even back then about steroids and nobody listened to him.

The late 1990s were a joke as far as balanced baseball coverage in this town. People think the Cubs bias is bad now, but it has actually gotten much better since those days. The Chicago media used to circle the wagons like nothing I've ever seen before (or since) to protect "The Icon" Sammy Sosa. It was truly nauseating.

russ99
12-31-2010, 09:25 AM
Nope.

He was one of the first to step up and make a stand, he welcomed testing, and freely offered to give a blood test as opposed to a urine test, and he welcomed Olympic style testing.

He was also one of the few that was willing to appear before congress and testify against doping in baseball.

Anyone that wants to accuse Frank Thomas of doping has a hill that reaches to the moon to climb to make it stick.

Obviously we all know that, but does the HOF voters and fans across the country know that?

I'm not saying that it's a correct assumption by any means but in some circles Frank is going to be questioned due to his size, his power prowess and the era of cheats he played in.

spawn
12-31-2010, 09:35 AM
Your memory is not fuzzy. Frank made a comment about steroids in 1998 talking about how he felt "something was going on" and that his numbers were at the top of the league when he started and now he was just an ordinary power hitter. Many in the local media (including a former Sun Times columnist who shall remain nameless) lashed out at Frank saying that he was just "jealous" of Sammy Sosa's accomplishments and fame. Frank was right all along even back then about steroids and nobody listened to him.

The late 1990s were a joke as far as balanced baseball coverage in this town. People think the Cubs bias is bad now, but it has actually gotten much better since those days. The Chicago media used to circle the wagons like nothing I've ever seen before (or since) to protect "The Icon" Sammy Sosa. It was truly nauseating.
That's what I thought. And that former Sun Times columnist was one of Sosa's biggest supporters. I do remember the jealousy claims as well.

DumpJerry
12-31-2010, 09:36 AM
Nope.

He was one of the first to step up and make a stand, he welcomed testing, and freely offered to give a blood test as opposed to a urine test, and he welcomed Olympic style testing.

He was also one of the few that was willing to appear before congress and testify against doping in baseball.

Anyone that wants to accuse Frank Thomas of doping has a hill that reaches to the moon to climb to make it stick.
Something else people forget is that Frank played football at Auburn. Auburn had a very stringent PED testing program (multiple random tests during the course of the year, sometimes more than one in a month). Given that he was a big guy at Auburn, it's almost 100% certain that he was all natural.

RE: Bagwell, it's hard to feel sorry for himself since he knew the weight lifting program he chose would not help him for baseball when there are weight lifting programs that could have helped him (lighter weights, more reps build strength and endurance but not bulk). It seems from what he said he started lifting when he got divorced, so he might have had other objectives for bulking up the pecs.

Frater Perdurabo
12-31-2010, 10:16 AM
Something else people forget is that Frank played football at Auburn. Auburn had a very stringent PED testing program (multiple random tests during the course of the year, sometimes more than one in a month). Given that he was a big guy at Auburn, it's almost 100% certain that he was all natural.

Frank has also said that his family is full of big people. And he's 6-5. Of course he's going to have more muscle mass and larger bones.

RKMeibalane
12-31-2010, 11:51 AM
Frank has also said that his family is full of big people. And he's 6-5. Of course he's going to have more muscle mass and larger bones.

And from what I remember, Frank has said multiple times that he's actually the smallest person in his family.

Frater Perdurabo
12-31-2010, 12:26 PM
And from what I remember, Frank has said multiple times that he's actually the smallest person in his family.

I'd be willing to bet he's referring to girth, not height.

Lyle Mouton
12-31-2010, 12:39 PM
RE: Bagwell, it's hard to feel sorry for himself since he knew the weight lifting program he chose would not help him for baseball when there are weight lifting programs that could have helped him (lighter weights, more reps build strength and endurance but not bulk). It seems from what he said he started lifting when he got divorced, so he might have had other objectives for bulking up the pecs.
What on earth are you talking about? Does that mean he shouldn't make the HOF?

DumpJerry
12-31-2010, 09:51 PM
What on earth are you talking about? Does that mean he shouldn't make the HOF?
Did I say that? Did you read the article? If you read the article, then you know what I'm talking about.

Lyle Mouton
01-01-2011, 12:51 AM
Did I say that? Did you read the article? If you read the article, then you know what I'm talking about.
Having read the article, your post makes no sense.

DumpJerry
01-01-2011, 12:56 AM
Having read the article, your post makes no sense.
Sorry I can't help you. I just don't know what to say.

RKMeibalane
01-01-2011, 06:15 AM
I'd be willing to bet he's referring to girth, not height.

He is.

tstrike2000
01-04-2011, 12:25 PM
Thread title is unnecessarily confusing.

I understood fine, too. I actually didn't know they shared the exact same birthday, but I think the thread title is also a reference that they also had remarkably similar numbers through most of their careers, with Frank being able to play a little longer.