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Fenway
10-21-2010, 08:34 PM
The 1-0 delivery to Fisk. He swings...long drive, left field...if it stays fair, it's gone...HOME RUN! The Red Sox win! And the series is tied, three games apiece! - Ned Martin on NBC Radio, calling Carlton Fisk's 12th inning game-winning home run at Fenway Park, October 21, 1975, off Pat Darcy of the Cincinnati Reds.

http://www.baseballdirect.com/audio_clips/508a.wav

TommyJohn
10-21-2010, 09:07 PM
"Over-rated!" *clap* *clap* *clap* *clap* *clap*

And quite frankly, if Fisk had been wearing the uniform of the Oakland A's or the Philadelphia Phillies, no one but NO ONE would still be talking about the home run, aside from the fanbases of said teams. Squeaky Ken Burns certainly wouldn't have had time to include it in his Red Sox documentary.

And don't get me started on Kirk Gibson...


"Ahhhhhhhhh!!! I hit the most famous mother****ing home run in baseball history, bitches! Ahhhhhhhhh!!!"

Marqhead
10-21-2010, 09:18 PM
Who won that World Series? :rolleyes:

Daver
10-21-2010, 09:28 PM
It was twenty years ago today, Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play...

twentywontowin
10-21-2010, 09:31 PM
Joe Carter > Carlton Fisk

...in terms of World Series home runs.

WhiteSox5187
10-21-2010, 09:53 PM
Anyone who can't acknowledge that as being a great World Series moment and a great World Series game is blinded by their hatred of the Red Sox.

Hitmen77
10-22-2010, 11:15 AM
Anyone who can't acknowledge that as being a great World Series moment and a great World Series game is blinded by their hatred of the Red Sox.

I agree. It was still a great World Series moment regardless of people being fed up with the Red Sox-centric coverage these days. Remember, the Fisk HR was before MLB got pigeon-holed into being treated like only a few select teams really matter in baseball. I don't think the Red Sox were all that over-hyped back in '75 and this was certainly seen as a big HR at the time. In fact, I remember afterwards (i'm too young to remember the '75 series) that the '75 Series was seen as one of the best ever because of the matchup between two great teams....especially Cincinnati's Big Red Machine.

That being said, that HR isn't the most dramatic HR ever in a World Series. Arguably the greatest World Series HR moment just observed its 50th anniversary 2 weeks ago (on Oct. 13). Maybe I missed it, but I don't remember seeing any hoopla over this anniversary. Maybe the media would be hyping it up more if the winning team played in NY or Boston. Here it is:

ix848GU0gNo

hi im skot
10-22-2010, 11:20 AM
Anyone who can't acknowledge that as being a great World Series moment and a great World Series game is blinded by their hatred of the Red Sox.

Fact.

sox1970
10-22-2010, 11:37 AM
The Fisk homer certainly capped one of the greatest World Series games ever. But without the Red Sox winning Game 7, it really doesn't mean jack squat. I agree with the previous poster who said that if it wasn't an east coast team, that homer would be long forgotten, or at least much less talked about in historical terms.

Marqhead
10-22-2010, 11:48 AM
Anyone who can't acknowledge that as being a great World Series moment and a great World Series game is blinded by their hatred of the Red Sox.

That doesn't mean I can't still raz Fenway for posting all things Red Sox on a White Sox board. :cool:

Madvora
10-22-2010, 11:54 AM
And don't get me started on Kirk Gibson...
I won't get you started, so no need to respond, but this is my favorite (non Sox) baseball momement ever.

TheOldRoman
10-22-2010, 11:55 AM
Anyone who can't acknowledge that as being a great World Series moment and a great World Series game is blinded by their hatred of the Red Sox.I don't agree with that. It is a nice moment, and it has its charm with Fisk waving the ball fair. In the end it was completely meaningless, though. The Red Sox lost the series. Aside from being a Sox moment and the Sox winning that series, Podednik's homer in game 2 was much more dramatic considering he hadn't hit one the entire regular season (along with the Lidge back story). I have seen the replay of Fisk's homer hundreds of times, and that is silly. Put it in a montage about the World Series to show the emotions? Great. Play it repeatedly and claim it to be one of the greatest World Series moments ever? No.

Johnny Mostil
10-22-2010, 12:46 PM
It is a nice moment, and it has its charm with Fisk waving the ball fair. In the end it was completely meaningless, though. The Red Sox lost the series.

And if Bernie Carbo hadn't tied the game with a two-out, three-run HR in the 8th, I'm not sure how memorable that Series would have been.

NLaloosh
10-22-2010, 12:53 PM
I'm going to Boston the first week of November and plan to get a tour of Fenway. Does anyone have any suggestions for me?

BTW, that was a great WS moment and it is more famous than it would be if it was a Kansas City Royal hitting it but whatever.

It's Fisk, who played more for the White than Red Sox!

Orta 4-6-3
10-22-2010, 01:54 PM
Fisk's homer was an amazing, dramatic moment in a World Series that was already amazing and dramatic, a Series that helped bring me back to baseball in a big way. The image of him waving the ball fair was, I believe, what started the practice of getting the "reaction shot" on sports broadcasts. It was a fitting capper to a tremendous game.

Having said that, I agree with many previous posters who say that if Fisk had not been on Boston, or an East Coast team, that moment would not be so often replayed, and thus not such a huge part of baseball mythology. The home runs of Mazeroski (happy belated 50th), Gibson, Puckett, and Carter were all more significant. And most outside New England and the Rhineland forget that, despite Fisk's heroics, the Reds ended up winning the World Series anyway later that night.

downstairs
10-22-2010, 02:56 PM
Had Boston won the series, I'd agree. But it really loses its luster for me. I understand it was, all in all, one of the better series all around. With- among many other things- a walk-off home run by the eventual losing team to push it to seven.

It is far, far overhyped.

MeteorsSox4367
10-22-2010, 03:23 PM
On the subject of World Series home runs, how about a little love for Mazeroski's home run to win the 1960 World Series and beat the Yankees?

Does Pittsburgh count as an East Coast bias? :)

Ex-Chicagoan
10-22-2010, 04:44 PM
The image of him waving the ball fair was, I believe, what started the practice of getting the "reaction shot" on sports broadcasts.

Just think - had the rat not distracted the cameraman...

http://www.sptimes.com/News/112399/news_pf/Sports/Rats_Fisk_s_homer.shtml

downstairs
10-22-2010, 04:49 PM
On the subject of World Series home runs, how about a little love for Mazeroski's home run to win the 1960 World Series and beat the Yankees?

Does Pittsburgh count as an East Coast bias?

Well, the problem with all of these anneversaries, is the time the World Series has played hasn't changed that much. So EVERY World Series anniversary happens around the same time.

Fenway
10-22-2010, 04:55 PM
Just think - had the rat not distracted the cameraman...

http://www.sptimes.com/News/112399/news_pf/Sports/Rats_Fisk_s_homer.shtml

I have met the rats great grandchildren

TDog
10-22-2010, 05:09 PM
...
And quite frankly, if Fisk had been wearing the uniform of the Oakland A's or the Philadelphia Phillies, no one but NO ONE would still be talking about the home run, aside from the fanbases of said teams. ...

That isn't true at all. If Reggie Jackson or Joe Rudi or Sal Bando or even Claudell Washington or Billy Williams had hit such a home run for Oakland to end one of the greatest-ever World Series games (the home team facing elimination, scoring three with a pinch-hit three-run home run in the bottom of the eighth and then the tremendous defense to save the game in extra-innings), people would still be talking about it as one of the most famous home runs in World Series history. The Phillies finished second in 1975 to the Pirates, but if they had won the division and made it to the postseason, they wouldn't have been the home team in 1975. I'm guessing, though, that if a player for the Phillies -- a team that wouldn't win its first championship, ever, until 1980 -- had hit such a home run in such a situation in such a game in 1976, it would be similarly celebrated.

It helped that there was a camera trained on Fisk waving as if to try to keep it fair. Fenway might be able to speak more to that than I, but such a thing was not a custom at the time and I have been told it was rather a fluke of circumstances.

In fact, Reggie Jackson or Billy Williams might be more remembered as members of the A's, just as many people forget that Kirk Gibson played for the Tigers and hit twice as many home runs in the 1984 World Series than he did for the Dodgers four Octobers later.

It is true that Fisk might not have made the Hall of Fame, at least as early as the second ballot, but for that home run. He did set the record for games played at the position and home runs hit while playing the position, though. Bill Mazeroski probably wouldn't be in the Hall of Fame if he hadn't hit (with deference to Fisk) the most celebrated home run in World Series history in 1960, for the Pirates no less. Mazeroski was a great second baseman, but Bobby Knoop was a great second baseman, maybe better than Mazeroski according to people I've talked with who played with and/or against them both.

You can write off appreciation for a great baseball moment as irrational Red Sox love, but that would be closer to irrational Red Sox hate than anything rooted in reality.

Brian26
10-23-2010, 10:49 PM
Fisk's homer was an amazing, dramatic moment in a World Series that was already amazing and dramatic, a Series that helped bring me back to baseball in a big way. The image of him waving the ball fair was, I believe, what started the practice of getting the "reaction shot" on sports broadcasts. It was a fitting capper to a tremendous game.

It helped that there was a camera trained on Fisk waving as if to try to keep it fair. Fenway might be able to speak more to that than I, but such a thing was not a custom at the time and I have been told it was rather a fluke of circumstances.

That's the significance of the moment. The homer by Fisk transcends who won the game or the series. More eloquent people than me have explained this better in the past concerning its importance in television history. The Fisk homer was arguably the greatest moment in televised sports history at that point, mostly because of the dramatic capture of Fisk's reaction out of the box. That had never happened before, especially for a nationally televised NIGHT game in millions upon millions of homes.

22 years later, I think Gibson's homer is the most dramatic moment I've seen (non Sox related, of course). Fisk still holds up too.

Carter and Puckett's moments don't hold up as well. The '93 Series was over before Carter ever swung the bat. The Blue Jays were the much better team, and the Carter homer was anti-climatic. The Puckett homer seems overshadowed now for several reasons, but the pitching in that series was the real story. Neither moment was helped by the piss-poor broadcasts on CBS at the time.

GoSox2K3
10-25-2010, 09:58 AM
On the subject of World Series home runs, how about a little love for Mazeroski's home run to win the 1960 World Series and beat the Yankees?

Does Pittsburgh count as an East Coast bias? :)

Well, that 1960 Series involved Yankees, therefore it was memorable (according to Ken Burns logic).:wink:

I have no problem with the Fisk HR being remembered. I hate the Red Sox hype as much as anyone, but that was a memorable moment.....and was so before Red Sox bias took off in MLB coverage.

Fenway
10-25-2010, 10:43 AM
I think you have to remember that the 75 World Series gave baseball a much needed shot in the arm. Because of a four day rain delay Games 6 and 7 were shown in primetime.

The Fisk homer was special but Bernie Carbo's blast in the 8th was a lightning bolt.

The 75 Series was the end of baseball as we knew it as free agency would begin in a few months.