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View Full Version : More respect for a Cubs fan or an ex-Cubs fan?


BeeBeeRichard
08-30-2010, 04:35 PM
Let's say you have a friend who's a Cubs fan, a serious fan -- not a cell-phone chatting, lawn-urinating, not-game-watching d-bag.

A number of years go by, and your learn that your friend is no longer a Cubs fan, and has converted to another NL team.

More respect for someone who sticks with the team they started with, or someone who switches teams?

jdm2662
08-30-2010, 04:57 PM
I have a friend who was a Cub fan until 2006. Since then, he dons Sox gear.

I still don't call him a real Sox fan.

tebman
08-30-2010, 05:00 PM
Let's say you have a friend who's a Cubs fan, a serious fan -- not a cell-phone chatting, lawn-urinating, not-game-watching d-bag.

A number of years go by, and your learn that your friend is no longer a Cubs fan, and has converted to another NL team.

More respect for someone who sticks with the team they started with, or someone who switches teams?

No question. My respect goes to someone who sticks with their team while being realistic. I've got a friend I've known since we were kids, 50 years ago. He's always been a Cub fan and I've always been a Sox fan, but we both love baseball. He and I go together to the Cub-Sox game at USCF every year. He's frustrated with the team's play and it's management, and he's saddened that the baseball team he's followed all his life has been turned into a cartoonish tourist attraction. He hasn't been to a home game there in years because he doesn't like what it's become, but he still follows the team and cheers when they win and contend.

People like him are deserving of much more respect than those who blow it off. I've always said that being a fan is like having a brother: sometimes your brother will make you crazy and do stupid things, but in the end he's still your brother.

WizardsofOzzie
08-30-2010, 05:26 PM
Depends on circumstances. I was raised a Cubs fan thanks to my grandfather, and changed sides when I turned 11 thanks to my step dad's influence and the fact that Frank Thomas was my favorite player. Later on in life I realized how good a switch it was, as I started to loathe the Cubs fan base and everything they stood for.

Hitmen77
08-30-2010, 05:40 PM
Depends on circumstances. I was raised a Cubs fan thanks to my grandfather, and changed sides when I turned 11 thanks to my step dad's influence and the fact that Frank Thomas was my favorite player. Later on in life I realized how good a switch it was, as I started to loathe the Cubs fan base and everything they stood for.

Maybe the poll should be aimed at adults who switch favorite teams.

I think there are plenty of people who switch allegiances during their childhood. I'm not going to hold someone to teams they were rooting for when they were 10.

As far as the poll question and how it applies to adults.....hmmmm, I'll have to think about that.

Rdy2PlayBall
08-30-2010, 05:50 PM
Who could blame them for leaving the Cubs as fans?

"What does a mama bear on the pill have in common with the World Series? No cubs." ~Harry Caray
:lol:

Honestly though, I think leaving a franchise is the same as jumping on another's bandwagon. The only excuse that seems reasonable to be okay are moving to another city and adopting another team, or an organization completely abandoning it's fan base... which I cannot think of a real example. I'm not against no longer being a fan of a certain team, but respect can only be rewarded to those who go through the ups and downs with their team. IMO

Johnny Mostil
08-30-2010, 06:32 PM
Uh, you all do realize this website was founded by an ex-Cub fan who switched to the Sox as an adult, right?

Beyond that, I'm not going to denigrate anybody for sticking with a team through thick and thin, but I'm not sure I'd always understand it. Without being crass about it, I note MLB teams are commercial products. Why stick with any inferior commercial product for year after year after year that doesn't show much sign of improving? The Cubs are an inferior product that don't show much sign of improving anytime soon.

Edit: Adding--I'd never want to discourage anybody from switching. The more Sox fans, the better!

LongLiveFisk
08-30-2010, 07:16 PM
It depends. I believe in sticking with your team UNLESS you feel you are being taken for a sucker. I remember after the Cubs looked so bad in the '08 playoffs, some Cubs fans were calling in to sports radio shows saying they were "done" and they just couldn't take it anymore and it was obvious the Cubs did not care to put a winning team on the field as long as the fans continued to fill Wrigley Field. Some said they would become Sox fans while others said they couldn't do that and would just find some other team to root for.

I wonder what percentage of them tuned into the Cubs game attentively on Opening Day 2009?

SephClone89
08-30-2010, 07:51 PM
Uh, you all do realize this website was founded by an ex-Cub fan who switched to the Sox as an adult, right?

Beyond that, I'm not going to denigrate anybody for sticking with a team through thick and thin, but I'm not sure I'd always understand it. Without being crass about it, I note MLB teams are commercial products. Why stick with any inferior commercial product for year after year after year that doesn't show much sign of improving? The Cubs are an inferior product that don't show much sign of improving anytime soon.

Edit: Adding--I'd never want to discourage anybody from switching. The more Sox fans, the better!

People do that because that's what supporting a sports team is all about.

Johnny Mostil
08-30-2010, 08:05 PM
People do that because that's what supporting a sports team is all about.

Spending your money on a piss-poor product year after year after year?:scratch: And this makes such fans better than those who switch because . . . ?

SephClone89
08-30-2010, 08:13 PM
Spending your money on a piss-poor product year after year after year?:scratch: And this makes such fans better than those who switch because . . . ?

Loyalty. I would never stop being a Sox fan. Plenty of our fellow Sox fans have endured decades of futility. Do you question that?

kittle42
08-30-2010, 08:16 PM
Loyalty. I would never stop being a Sox fan. Plenty of our fellow Sox fans have endured decades of futility. Do you question that?

Seriously. Until 5 years ago, the Sox' futility was fairly equal to that of the Cubs. What would you have said to folks who abandoned our Sox before 2005?

DSpivack
08-30-2010, 08:33 PM
Loyalty. I would never stop being a Sox fan. Plenty of our fellow Sox fans have endured decades of futility. Do you question that?

It's hard for me to see myself ever stopping being a fan of the Sox, Bulls, Hawks or Bears [and probably in that order], but if one team went on a Royal or Pirate-like stretch of futility, I can see it happening. It would be hard for me to blame a Pirates or Royals fan for giving up on the team after nearly two decades of futility.

My dad was a Cub fan for decades, but ultimately just gave up being a fan after 40 years or so of frustration.

g0g0
08-30-2010, 08:45 PM
I chose the other way after starting as a Sox fan and doing the whole WGN Cubs watching thing. I took a break last year to watch the Sox, and even though they finished like 5 below .500 I enjoyed seeing a different team. But during spring training the old familiar strings started tugging and I wanted to go back. If I just wanted to watch championship after championship I would be a Yankees fan. Then I could poo-poo on the Cubs, Sox and every other team out there. But what fun is that? I love my Cubbies.

gogosox675
08-30-2010, 08:49 PM
I'm 18. I've liked the White Sox for a while, but they became my favorite team midway through last year. My parents became Cubs fans during the 1984 season, so when I was growing up, my family always rooted for the Cubs. My mom still roots for the Cubs with 100% loyalty. My dad is a bandwagon fan (he loves the Yankees, for crying out loud:rolleyes:) and in the NL he has all but abandoned the Cubs for the Reds. I love my dad, but I've never been able to take him seriously because he always has a new favorite team. It sucks that my mom roots for the Cubs, but that's the only team she's ever liked, so I respect it.

GoGoCrede
08-30-2010, 09:04 PM
I respect both. I don't like to judge others' fan rating. If someone converts to the Sox, great. If someone converts to the Cubs, great. It's not my business.

Madscout
08-30-2010, 09:26 PM
I think for me, it all depends on how much they know the game. If they are coming to the Sox because they simply look at the standings and see that the Sox have a better record, then I have major doubts. If they are looking long term, looking at the standings of past years, can site examples of their grievances against the previous organization, and reasons they like the new one, then I can understand. Any Cubs fan who gives up their Cubbie blue right now is not a band wagon jumper. The organization has taken advantage of the fact that fans would come out no matter what they did. When they finally decided to start trying to win, they just threw money at the next hot thing, instead of changing the culture of the organization. I guess we can say the same thing about the Sox, but the Sox were a little more prudent with free agents and trades. They have come to it with a consistant philosophy (albiet, not always following it), but you can definately see a patern. The Cubs have locked themselves into contracts with questionable players, refused to hold players accountable, stayed loyal to sinking ships (Zambrano and Wood), and shipped quality guys (DeRosa).

Also, I think the accurate measurement for switching teams is if you are going to stay there for a while. I don't mind the switch...but if you switch back in 2 years then I can't respect you.

NardiWasHere
08-30-2010, 10:31 PM
I'm 18. I've liked the White Sox for a while, but they became my favorite team midway through last year. My parents became Cubs fans during the 1984 season, so when I was growing up, my family always rooted for the Cubs. My mom still roots for the Cubs with 100% loyalty. My dad is a bandwagon fan (he loves the Yankees, for crying out loud:rolleyes:) and in the NL he has all but abandoned the Cubs for the Reds. I love my dad, but I've never been able to take him seriously because he always has a new favorite team. It sucks that my mom roots for the Cubs, but that's the only team she's ever liked, so I respect it.

Did you ever consider running away as a child?

Johnny Mostil
08-31-2010, 08:52 AM
Loyalty. I would never stop being a Sox fan. Plenty of our fellow Sox fans have endured decades of futility. Do you question that?

Not at all. As I said, I won't denigrate anybody sticking with a team over "loyalty." I've been attending Sox games longer than you or "kittle42" have been alive, so I'll thank you not to question my loyalty (or even rationality, for which you might have more justification). What I do question is that this necessarily makes you--or us--"better" fans. It doesn't.

Here's something else that nags at me: right now, like it or not, the Sox are the second team in the second city. If you think about it, then you'll realize attitudes like this about Cubs fans--that the "true" ones are just being "loyal"--will keep it that way.

Johnny Mostil
08-31-2010, 08:53 AM
I respect both. I don't like to judge others' fan rating. If someone converts to the Sox, great. If someone converts to the Cubs, great. It's not my business.

Exactly.

Moses_Scurry
08-31-2010, 09:42 AM
If I survived Jim Fregosi, Tim Hulett, Dave LaPoint, Freddy Manrique, Donny Hill, Gary Redus, Jose DeLeon, Ron Hassey, Reid Nichols, Melido Perez, Ricky Horton, Neil Allen, Eddie Williams, Mike Caruso, Royce Clayton, Jaime Navarro, Terry Bevington, Todd Richie, Billy Koch, et al with my Sox fandom intact, I will be a fan for life. I'd imagine there are cub fans who can say the same about Chuck Rainey, Calvin Schiraldi, Al Nipper, Augie Ojeda, Warren Brewster, Mel Rojas, Dave Smith, Danny Jackson, Jeff Blauser, Gary Scott, et al.

I don't like people changing teams, but I accept it if it only happens once. The back-and-forth, wishy-washy, follow whoever's winning is ridiculous.

g0g0
08-31-2010, 09:53 AM
I'm 18. I've liked the White Sox for a while, but they became my favorite team midway through last year. My parents became Cubs fans during the 1984 season, so when I was growing up, my family always rooted for the Cubs. My mom still roots for the Cubs with 100% loyalty. My dad is a bandwagon fan (he loves the Yankees, for crying out loud:rolleyes:) and in the NL he has all but abandoned the Cubs for the Reds. I love my dad, but I've never been able to take him seriously because he always has a new favorite team. It sucks that my mom roots for the Cubs, but that's the only team she's ever liked, so I respect it.

My dad is like that too though he doesn't really follow sports a lot. He enjoys watching the underdog teams that are making magical runs during the year. Nothing wrong with that IMO. Sports are just entertainment.

FielderJones
08-31-2010, 12:08 PM
Mrs FJ grew up in Bridgeport with a dad who was a baseball fan, and liked the Cubs a bit more than the Sox, but went to both teams' games. When we met she was still much more a Cubs fan than a Sox fan.

Over the years we have been married this has shifted, and she is now much more a Sox fan. During interleague she will cheer for the Sox. Her younger sister considers her a traitor. :tongue:

2005 really clinched it for her. She saw the Sox organization put it together in the way the Cubs have not in over a century. I don't consider her a bandwagon jumper; I'm glad to have her support the Sox.

FarmerAndy
09-01-2010, 10:13 AM
In my world respect isn't something that's earned based on rooting or not rooting for a sports team. But that's just me.

doublem23
09-01-2010, 10:19 AM
In my world respect isn't something that's earned based on rooting or not rooting for a sports team. But that's just me.

I think you're kind of missing the point, nobody is saying they'd respect a wife-beater just because he's stuck it out with the Cubs. It's more, if you had two normal friends, and one was a Cub fan who stuck with the team and another bounced the Cubs for the Sox, would you still look at them the same way?

Johnny Mostil
09-01-2010, 11:03 AM
I think you're kind of missing the point, nobody is saying they'd respect a wife-beater just because he's stuck it out with the Cubs. It's more, if you had two normal friends, and one was a Cub fan who stuck with the team and another bounced the Cubs for the Sox, would you still look at them the same way?

While I read the question about the same way you did, I note the OP asked about a friend who "converted to another NL team."

Are we respecting AAAA baseball around here now?:tongue:

FarmerAndy
09-01-2010, 11:08 AM
I think you're kind of missing the point, nobody is saying they'd respect a wife-beater just because he's stuck it out with the Cubs. It's more, if you had two normal friends, and one was a Cub fan who stuck with the team and another bounced the Cubs for the Sox, would you still look at them the same way?

Honestly, it wouldn't matter to me either way as long as they knew the game. I know all fans take it in different ways, but I just enjoy watching baseball with people who are baseball smart. It doesn't really concern me whether they like the Sox, Cubs, Twins, ect., or change their mind all the time.

Hitmen77
09-01-2010, 04:27 PM
Let's say you have a friend who's a Cubs fan, a serious fan -- not a cell-phone chatting, lawn-urinating, not-game-watching d-bag.

A number of years go by, and your learn that your friend is no longer a Cubs fan, and has converted to another NL team.

More respect for someone who sticks with the team they started with, or someone who switches teams?

I don't know if I would automatically have more respect for one or the other. If someone switches over time to another NL team, that's his/her choice. Just as long as it's not a total bandwagon move and that this person is going to suddenly wave W flags the next time the Cubs go on a spending spree and buy themselves back in to contention.

If someone has made has gradually moved over to another team over the years and this isn't just some flip-flop, then fine. Maybe it isn't just the lack of pennants (of course, that can change). Maybe someone is just tired of the whole Wrigley circus atmosphere and all the ass-clowns that dominate that place now. That's something that isn't going to change with a management shake up or with new stars coming on the scene. With that in mind, I voted for the ex-Cub fan getting more respect because he has the guts to see that, when it comes to Cubdom these days, the emperor has no clothes.

I have respect for true die hards who stick with their team to the bitter end, but here are some of the more plausible reasons I can think of for someone becoming a true "ex Cub fan".

1. As I said earlier, someone was a fan of one team as a kid and then settled on another team by the time they reached adulthood.

2. People who move to Chicago from out of town, locate to the north side and instantly become Cub fans - but later "see the light" once they've been in Chicago a while. I know a couple of people who took this path. They went right for the Cubs at first, but when they got settled in and got to know the city, they realized that all the negative Sox fan and Sox Park stereotypes people where feeding them weren't true and the Sox were more to their liking.

3. Relocation. If someone moves to another city, they might gradually adopt that city's team as their new favorite.

4. Some people (like FJ pointed out) change allegiances thanks to their significant other. In some instances that I have seen, it's a casual Cubs fan (they like the Cubs because they grew up in a Cubs family or a Cubs neighborhood, but never followed baseball closely) that marries a die hard Sox fan and that person becomes primarily a Sox fan. The people I know who did this didn't start hating the Cubs....they just like the Sox more now.

I'm leery of any die-hard Cubs fan who is just jumping on the Sox bandwagon while the going is good here or the going is even worse than usual up north. I figure those people don't really mean it and will change their stripes the next time the teams' fortunes change. I remember when Royko supposedly became a Sox fan because he was fed up with the Cubs, but you just knew that was just baloney.

soxfan22
09-02-2010, 02:24 PM
Being a Scot living in London, I'm curious, have any Chicago celebrities ever shown their allegiance to one club then changed it when the other was doing well?

CWSpalehoseCWS
09-02-2010, 02:38 PM
I respect both, but I think the Cubs fan that stays with the Cubs earns a little bit more. I hate the fair weather fan thing, and I'll stick by the Sox no matter how horrible they are, so Cubs fans should do the same.

g0g0
09-02-2010, 02:38 PM
Being a Scot living in London, I'm curious, have any Chicago celebrities ever shown their allegiance to one club then changed it when the other was doing well?

John Cusack is the most obvious one.

gogosox675
09-02-2010, 04:08 PM
Being a Scot living in London, I'm curious, have any Chicago celebrities ever shown their allegiance to one club then changed it when the other was doing well?

Eddie Vedder, a Cub fan, was good friends with Jack McDowell and occasionally wore a Sox cap around during their heyday in the early '90s. I'm sure this was more because he was a friend of McDowell than anything, but I'm not 100% sure.

Hitmen77
09-02-2010, 05:06 PM
Speaking of fans switching allegiances, this reminds me of an article the Tribune ran on the front page of their sports section sometime in maybe 1998 (after the White Flag PR fiasco and while Sosa was on his legitimate HR chase) that interviewed ~4 different people who grew up as Sox fans, never liked the Cubs, and finally had enough and converted to Cubs fans.

I'm sure the Trib just loved doing that story, but I remember fuming at the time and thinking those people were a bunch of fair weather fans who "turned to the dark side" just because the Sox were in a down period and the Cubs/Sosa were hot and trendy at the time. In 2005, I wondered what those fans from that article were saying now. No doubt they were back on the Sox bandwagon at that point wishing they were never in that article.

So, in that respect, I can see why people would be annoyed at a Cubs fan who never liked the Sox before who simply jumped ship because the Sox done well in recent years. But, like I said earlier, there are reasonable circumstances for switching. Plus, the original question was about switching to another NL team, not switching to the crosstown rival.

MARTINMVP
09-03-2010, 12:08 AM
I was done with the Cubs after the 2004 season. Had enough of Sammy Sosa long before then, the crying about Steve Stone and the unfair criticisms. That was it. By 2000, I had slowly dipped from being an above casual fan to more of a casual fan. After 2004, I began following news and current events more and pretty much allowed myself to get out of the loop with sports. Even though I had gone from 2004 and beyond as an assumed Cubs fan, I didn't watch any of the 2007 or 2008 seasons. I had absolutely no idea that the Cubs were that good in 2008. Not a ****ing clue.

After I graduated college and began working in an office all day, I slowly began relaxing at night by watching baseball again. Everyone around me is pretty much Sox fans and after watching a few games early last year, I found myself getting familiar with the players and started to feel something for the Sox side. My best friend took me to a few Sox games last year and I had a blast. I guess I made my attempt to switch mid last summer, and I admit, I probably jumped the gun.

I started to feel some guilt about the idea of switching. It was hard. Even when the Cubs were in 1st place for a few days in early August last year, I had absolutely no care in the world though, so where did the guilt come from? I even PMed voodoo about it and he said to avoid reading Cubs stuff - the opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. Brilliant idea, not just in reference to the Cubs, but in general (thanks again voodoo!).

Going into spring training, I felt some mixed emotions - mostly from guilt. When I watched MLB Network's "30 Clubs in 30 Days," I remember watching the Cubs one first, then watching the Sox one and thinking this is the team I have to follow because I actually feel a connection with these guys after starting to watch in 2009.

I don't want to say the Cubs crappy year this year helped reinforce how I feel... because the first two months of the season for the Sox weren't pretty. I still went to games and had fun and felt a real connection. I don't have any real emotions towards Zambrano, Lee (now traded) or Ramirez (even though Ramirez was a great steal in 2003, and I was excited about it back then). No emotion towards Dempster, Fukodome cause they came around after I stopped watching. I had excitement and emotions for AJ, Paulie, Rios and even Vizquel. Every Sox loss seems to hurt personally, especially since the slide began in Baltimore.

Posting here has been fun and also helped me build emotions towards the White Sox. I'm not sure my story will make me respectable for leaving the Cubs or a quitter, but that is my story. I'll fly high or fall down with this year's Sox team. I've already been to some eight games and hoping to do at least two more before the end of the season. I do consider this my true breakout year for becoming a Sox fan.

Right now, I consider myself at the slightly above casual. I won't watch every pitch every single day or night... and I don't let the schedule dictate my daily/nightly activities with the fiance or hanging out with friends, etc. But I do feel a level of commitment with this team now than I ever had with the Cubs (maybe going to as many games as I have this year and even last year to an extent has helped that). As a kid and through high school, I think I'd only been to about 3 Cub games.

RadioheadRocks
09-03-2010, 12:59 AM
Come away from the Dark Side and ye shall find forgiveness... :D:

GoGoCrede
09-03-2010, 01:05 AM
John Cusack is the most obvious one.

Vince Vaughn's shown up to the Cell a few times wearing a Sox hat.

soxfan22
09-06-2010, 01:23 PM
Thanks for the answer on Celebrity switching from Cubs to Sox but............

Where I grew up you couldn't just change teams, you were either born into it or you didn't watch sports, but you never switched. You followed your team and through good and bad times you stuck with it. How can you trust someone who switches teams?

guillensdisciple
09-06-2010, 01:48 PM
Thanks for the answer on Celebrity switching from Cubs to Sox but............

Where I grew up you couldn't just change teams, you were either born into it or you didn't watch sports, but you never switched. You followed your team and through good and bad times you stuck with it. How can you trust someone who switches teams?


While I get your overall point, and might be misreading the final sentence- I don't think one can base trust of a person solely on their ability to choose teams.

It's just sports.

Rockin Robin
09-06-2010, 02:30 PM
I don't have the time or patience to wade through this, but are we really debating whether a person is deserving of respect depending on the sports team they happen to root for? Really?

cub killer
09-06-2010, 04:42 PM
I don't have the time or patience to wade through this, but are we really debating whether a person is deserving of respect depending on the sports team they happen to root for? Really?Within the context of sports fandom. Nothing more than that.

gaelhound
09-06-2010, 06:34 PM
My opinion is how a guy came to his team would determine my opinion of switching away from that team. I live in Madison Wisconsin now. I run into guys from Wausau Wisconsin who tell me they are Cub fans. When I ask why and they tell me Harry Caray on WGN or that they liked Sammy Sosa, I would have no problem with them seeing the light and finding another team. If a guy is three or four generations in with a hometown team, you stick with them. I have some of those guys as friends, and even though I torture them relentlessly and deservedly, i respect them for staying with the Cubs, and would respect them less if they bailed.

In my family it is the White Sox and Notre Dame. I will take my lumps but I will die in the Camp with all my south side Irish family.

Bob Roarman
09-06-2010, 08:44 PM
Respect as in the actual respect you have for a person or as a sports fan? It's just a game folks.

Rdy2PlayBall
09-06-2010, 10:59 PM
Respect as in the actual respect you have for a person or as a sports fan? It's just a game folks.I interpreted it as the sports fan, but some posts here seem to have interpreted it as if you would have some kind of problem with the person who actually chose to switch.

If they switch, good for them... if they stay, I respect how they go through the ups-and-downs with their team. No big deal either way.

guillensdisciple
09-07-2010, 03:31 AM
I don't really care either way. I used to hate the Cubs a lot, but now I don't care about them at all- whether they win or lose. I just treat them like I would a team in the NL West. No need to pay attention to them when they basically mean nothing to us in the broader scope of things. Given that, I definitely don't care about fanhood whichever way.

Hell, when I came to America, I enjoyed watching the Cubs as much as I did the Sox. IN a sense, I am an ex-Cub fan (since 1998, majority has been Sox though). My parents still follow the Cubs and cheer for them, but I don't care about their affiliation. All I care for is mine.

soxfan22
09-07-2010, 11:33 AM
While I get your overall point, and might be misreading the final sentence- I don't think one can base trust of a person solely on their ability to choose teams.

It's just sports.

Ok, fair enough but I've never respected anyone I never trusted!

I understand this is just banter, but sport can bring the best and worst out in a person

harwar
09-10-2010, 08:06 AM
I have an inner circle of friends who love baseball as much as i and it is a very large part of their lives and to whom switching teams would be inconceivable .. two are cub fans of over 40 years and they could no more switch teams than change their religious beliefs .. sticking together no matter what is a big thing with us and that carries over to everything in our lives, including sports .. we all have second favorites as we've lived in different places but we are all from Chicago originally .. if i grew up a cubs fan *shudders* i would be dragging myself to that park to deal with all of that bull**** over there ..

slavko
09-10-2010, 11:14 AM
Change is possible when you subconsciously conclude that what you once thought was wrong. Admitting you were wrong is difficult under any circumstances. After that has taken place another set of beliefs can fill the void.

So, my friends, it is possible to change allegiances or beliefs or teams. It happens all the time in real life, why not in baseball?

But it doesn't happen by saying "OK, now I'm a Sox fan."

soxfan22
09-10-2010, 04:30 PM
So, if you're a Cubs fan and then change to a Sox fan, it's no big deal? You won't be shunned or outcast? Is this a friendly rivalry?

Just trying to understand this.

Ex-Chicagoan
09-10-2010, 04:39 PM
One can absolutely change. I, for one, was raised to be a Cub fan. My younger brother was a Sox fan.

When I hit age 11, I decided it was time to start to make my own decisions about a number of things under my control, and baseball was one of them. This happened to coincide with the change in Sox ownership - it's hard to remember, but I probably saw the free agent moves and "new beginning", and thought it was time. (Since both teams were lousy in 1980, it's not like I jumped a bandwagon, either.)

My brother ended up changing his allegiances as well and aligned himself more closely with the rest of the family. I'm the outcast, and that's just fine.

FielderJones
09-10-2010, 05:01 PM
So, if you're a Cubs fan and then change to a Sox fan, it's no big deal? You won't be shunned or outcast? Is this a friendly rivalry?

Just trying to understand this.

Not by me. I welcome any Cubs fans who get fed up and switch allegiance.

soxfan22
09-11-2010, 06:07 PM
Not by me. I welcome any Cubs fans who get fed up and switch allegiance.

So. there's no bitterness in the Cubs/Sox rivalry, switch allegiance kinda thing?

CLUBHOUSE KID
09-12-2010, 10:09 PM
Honestly, it wouldn't matter to me either way as long as they knew the game. I know all fans take it in different ways, but I just enjoy watching baseball with people who are baseball smart. It doesn't really concern me whether they like the Sox, Cubs, Twins, ect., or change their mind all the time.

Best thing said in this thread.

DumpJerry
09-13-2010, 11:31 AM
Not by me. I welcome any Cubs fans who get fed up and switch allegiance.

So. there's no bitterness in the Cubs/Sox rivalry, switch allegiance kinda thing?
Not really. Some people just see the light and do the right thing. The others just throw trash on the outfield.

tstrike2000
09-13-2010, 11:49 AM
I have respect for people that stay fans of their teams through thick and thin. I know some people that switch teams, but they still loyal no matter what. It's the bandwaggoner's or long time Cub fans that criticize me for not being a Cub fan or bring up the stupid things about The Cell's neighborhood, attendance, etc that I don't respect.

SephClone89
09-14-2010, 02:24 AM
I have respect for people that stay fans of their teams through thick and thin. I know some people that switch teams, but they still loyal no matter what. It's the bandwaggoner's or long time Cub fans that criticize me for not being a Cub fan or bring up the stupid things about The Cell's neighborhood, attendance, etc that I don't respect.

This. I have far more respect for a hardcore and not obnoxious Cubs fan than I do your average casual White Sox fan who just knows Paulie and AJ.

Hitmen77
09-14-2010, 08:53 AM
Not really. Some people just see the light and do the right thing. The others just throw trash on the outfield.

That's hilarious....and true! Love it!

I have respect for people that stay fans of their teams through thick and thin. I know some people that switch teams, but they still loyal no matter what. It's the bandwaggoner's or long time Cub fans that criticize me for not being a Cub fan or bring up the stupid things about The Cell's neighborhood, attendance, etc that I don't respect.

Exactly. These people are the worst. This really went on the decline after 2005. It used to be really bad and I'd hear this kind of crap from many Cubs fans.

g0g0
09-14-2010, 09:37 AM
That's hilarious....and true! Love it!



Exactly. These people are the worst. This really went on the decline after 2005. It used to be really bad and I'd hear this kind of crap from many Cubs fans.

But it's funny how much crap I hear the other way about all Cubs fans are just partying idiots who throw crap onto the field. Just as stupid. Stereotypes suck don't they? :wink:

Hitmen77
09-15-2010, 12:25 PM
But it's funny how much crap I hear the other way about all Cubs fans are just partying idiots who throw crap onto the field. Just as stupid. Stereotypes suck don't they? :wink:

....except that a lot of Cub fans have thrown trash on the field and it wasn't just a one-time thing. It's not just one or two "Ligue" type losers or something that happened just once.

To be fair though, I'll agree with your comment that it's not right to say "all" Cubs fans are of the "partying idiot" crowd. I know some Cubs fans who hate that crowd at Wrigley....but here's the catch. Just about every Cub fan I know (including the true fans of the sport who really know their stuff) have thrown the "attendance" card in my face and love to crow about how much more popular the Cubs are (or, like I said at least this was the case a few years ago). IMO, you can't have it both ways. You can't rag on Sox fans because of bad attendance at the Cell vs. great attendance at Wrigley and call us bad fans because of that and crow about popularity - and then wash your hand of the party/tourist crowd up North that's giving you those great turnouts and complain that Sox fans are making "stereotypes" by bringing them up.

Same with the whole neighborhood argument, if someone is going to always bring up that the Sox as playing in a bad neighborhood with no night life, then I don't accept their protest when Sox fans "stereotype" about the party crowd at Wrigley who are there thanks to the Lakeview neighborhood and bars.

Like I said earlier, this has been on the decline since 2005. Before then, just about every Cub fan I knew were all over the attendance/bad neighborhood issue (but of course *ahem* don't lump them in with the party crowd!). Nowadays? Eh, it's not so bad anymore. With 2005 and then when 2008 didn't "happen" and plus how bad the Cubs has been this year - that has really taken the wind of the sails of these "obnoxious" fans.

g0g0
09-15-2010, 01:57 PM
....except that a lot of Cub fans have thrown trash on the field and it wasn't just a one-time thing. It's not just one or two "Ligue" type losers or something that happened just once.

To be fair though, I'll agree with your comment that it's not right to say "all" Cubs fans are of the "partying idiot" crowd. I know some Cubs fans who hate that crowd at Wrigley....but here's the catch. Just about every Cub fan I know (including the true fans of the sport who really know their stuff) have thrown the "attendance" card in my face and love to crow about how much more popular the Cubs are (or, like I said at least this was the case a few years ago). IMO, you can't have it both ways. You can't rag on Sox fans because of bad attendance at the Cell vs. great attendance at Wrigley and call us bad fans because of that and crow about popularity - and then wash your hand of the party/tourist crowd up North that's giving you those great turnouts and complain that Sox fans are making "stereotypes" by bringing them up.

Same with the whole neighborhood argument, if someone is going to always bring up that the Sox as playing in a bad neighborhood with no night life, then I don't accept their protest when Sox fans "stereotype" about the party crowd at Wrigley who are there thanks to the Lakeview neighborhood and bars.

Like I said earlier, this has been on the decline since 2005. Before then, just about every Cub fan I knew were all over the attendance/bad neighborhood issue (but of course *ahem* don't lump them in with the party crowd!). Nowadays? Eh, it's not so bad anymore. With 2005 and then when 2008 didn't "happen" and plus how bad the Cubs has been this year - that has really taken the wind of the sails of these "obnoxious" fans.

I'm still just mystified by this attendance argument. I've seen it on here a ton and honestly have never thought about it. I guess up there it's a bragging right? As a Cubs fan I will never put that in your face. :smile: I want to see what they do on the field more.