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View Full Version : Why a "Pennant" race?


chisoxfanatic
08-08-2010, 01:16 PM
I know that way back when, only 1 team in each league was in the postseason, and they immediately won the league pennant and played in the World Series. But, that hasn't been the case for a long time. Especially in the past 15 or so years, when teams have had to win TWO rounds to even get to the World Series, I don't really understand why they say that a team is in a "pennant race" when talking about the divisional title races, because you do not win the pennant just by winning your division! Does anyone have any explanation?

DumpJerry
08-08-2010, 01:20 PM
You have to make the post-season to win the pennant. Therefore, qualifying for the post-season makes the regular season a pennant race.

chisoxfanatic
08-08-2010, 01:22 PM
You have to make the post-season to win the pennant. Therefore, qualifying for the post-season makes the regular season a pennant race.
But 75% of the teams who make the postseason don't win the pennant. I really don't think there even IS a "pennant race" anymore.

TDog
08-08-2010, 01:38 PM
But 75% of the teams who make the postseason don't win the pennant. I really don't think there even IS a "pennant race" anymore.

Winning the pennant means going to the World Series. The postseason is part of the pennant chase, but it isn't strictly speaking a race because it is teams completing one-on-one.

The term "pennant race" may be antiquated, certainly. When I was in high school in the early '70s, I was talking to the guy sitting in front of me in Old Comiskey, and when I told him I thought the White Sox could win the pennant, he corrected me with "you mean half-a-pennant."

The pennant races have been replaced by divisional races. Jon Miller refers to a "wild card division," which doesn't really exist. It is a separate race, though. Many teams are involved in these separate races simultaneously.

Nonetheless, the goal being to get to the World Series, the races to qualify for the divisional and championship series to qualify for the World Series (baseball doesn't have "playoffs" unless two teams tie, just as other sports will flip a coin if need be to decide what team will go to their postseason playoffs in the event of regular-season ties the race continue to be called "pennant races."

cub killer
08-08-2010, 05:36 PM
It's a term that lingered beyond 1969, and I like that people still use it. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. It sounds better than "division race". It's a traditional thing to call it a pennant race, and it should always be called that even if, God forbid, the playoffs expand further.

TornLabrum
08-08-2010, 07:14 PM
And of course we fly a flag for every division title we've won.

Whitesox029
08-08-2010, 08:05 PM
And of course we fly a flag for every division title we've won.
Exactly...you could say that there are division pennants, and then The [League] Pennant, which is where the term originally comes from.

doublem23
08-08-2010, 09:32 PM
It's just a baseball thing people say, like how certain puckheads can't let go of the term "sweater" despite the fact hockey jerseys are about as thin as a t-shirt nowadays.

hi im skot
08-09-2010, 12:28 AM
It's just a baseball thing people say, like how certain puckheads can't let go of the term "sweater" despite the fact hockey jerseys are about as thin as a t-shirt nowadays.

You are on fire tonight.

soxfanreggie
08-09-2010, 12:45 AM
It's just a baseball thing people say, like how certain puckheads can't let go of the term "sweater" despite the fact hockey jerseys are about as thin as a t-shirt nowadays.

Bingo! :D:

I hope they never get rid of calling it winning a "pennant". It's a historic part of the game, and teams still fly flags for their championships.

Fenway
08-09-2010, 12:47 AM
The gonfolon flies at Wrigley

http://www.arcollectibles.com/wrig-flags.jpg

Nellie_Fox
08-09-2010, 02:20 AM
It's just a baseball thing people say, like how certain puckheads can't let go of the term "sweater" despite the fact hockey jerseys are about as thin as a t-shirt nowadays.:rolling: