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thomas35forever
08-04-2010, 11:40 PM
So I'm reading one of Richard Lindberg's White Sox books right now and it said John Allyn fired Harry at the end of the 1975 season. Obviously, '75 was not Harry's last year calling Sox games. Does anyone know how he got his job back?

MisterB
08-05-2010, 12:01 AM
So I'm reading one of Richard Lindberg's White Sox books right now and it said John Allyn fired Harry at the end of the 1975 season. Obviously, '75 was not Harry's last year calling Sox games. Does anyone know how he got his job back?

I would assume that Bill Veeck hired him back when he bought the team a few months later.

TDog
08-05-2010, 12:37 AM
I would assume that Bill Veeck hired him back when he bought the team a few months later.

The firing was considered a token gesture because the White Sox were going to be under new management in the 1976 season. The only question was whether Bill Veeck, who reportedly had a bad relationship with Harry Caray, would hire him back.

In those days, Harry Caray apparently worked cheap. He could have found a job that paid better, certainly. He seemed to want to stay in Chicago, and the Cubs were not in the market for him at that point.

Lip Man 1
08-05-2010, 02:17 AM
October 1, 1975 - Owner John Allyn appears on Johnny Morris’ sports on WBBM-TV. While talking about the pending sale of the club he says if he does own the team in 1976, Harry Caray won’t be back as lead announcer. Allyn is tired of Caray and wants to fire him. The next day Caray has this retort, "I can’t believe any man can own a ballclub and be as dumb as John Allyn. Did he make enough to own it or did he inherit it?"

Lip

EdHerman12
08-05-2010, 03:59 PM
Here is a link to a story from a 1978 article in Sports Illustrated that mentions the firing and re-hiring...it's pretty funny...

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1094077/1/index.htm

FielderJones
08-05-2010, 04:18 PM
October 1, 1975 - Owner John Allyn appears on Johnny Morris’ sports on WBBM-TV. While talking about the pending sale of the club he says if he does own the team in 1976, Harry Caray won’t be back as lead announcer. Allyn is tired of Caray and wants to fire him. The next day Caray has this retort, "I can’t believe any man can own a ballclub and be as dumb as John Allyn. Did he make enough to own it or did he inherit it?"

The whole Allyn era was the nadir of Sox ownership.

WhiteSox5187
08-05-2010, 05:04 PM
I seem to recall that at the first Cubs-Sox game in 1997 Harry sang the seventh inning stretch and I also seem to recall he said "Root root for the White Sox." Does anyone else remember that? If he sang did he have the consent of the White Sox?

Medford Bobby
08-05-2010, 05:09 PM
I seem to recall that at the first Cubs-Sox game in 1997 Harry sang the seventh inning stretch and I also seem to recall he said "Root root for the White Sox." Does anyone else remember that? If he sang did he have the consent of the White Sox?

Boy, I'd have to roll the tape on that one and check......:scratch:

russ99
08-05-2010, 05:19 PM
Here is a link to a story from a 1978 article in Sports Illustrated that mentions the firing and re-hiring...it's pretty funny...

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1094077/1/index.htm

That's a fantastic article.

Nothing was better as a 12 year old kid in '78 than Sox baseball with Harry Caray, especially when he was holding court in the bleachers.

thomas35forever
08-05-2010, 05:42 PM
The whole Allyn era was the nadir of Sox ownership.
Based on what I've read in that book, you're probably right. That was a time when the area surrounding the ballpark was perceived as dangerous and it kept fans away. I've heard about the Sox almost skipping off to Florida and to a lesser extent, Milwaukee, but I never knew they almost left for Seattle too.

Nellie_Fox
08-05-2010, 11:59 PM
Based on what I've read in that book, you're probably right. That was a time when the area surrounding the ballpark was perceived as dangerous and it kept fans away. I've heard about the Sox almost skipping off to Florida and to a lesser extent, Milwaukee, but I never knew they almost left for Seattle too.There were some Denver discussions too.

PeteWard
08-06-2010, 12:15 AM
There were some Denver discussions too.

Denver! You're right. Remember the 3-6 home games per year in Milwaukee before the Brewers moved there? The faded astroturf infield with the grass outfield? The eerieness and the echos in old park on a night in September with about 3,000 in the place and the Sox 30 games out? Bad times but I still loved it.

MarySwiss
08-06-2010, 12:20 AM
Based on what I've read in that book, you're probably right. That was a time when the area surrounding the ballpark was perceived as dangerous and it kept fans away. I've heard about the Sox almost skipping off to Florida and to a lesser extent, Milwaukee, but I never knew they almost left for Seattle too.

IIRC, one of the principals in the Seattle attempt was the actor Danny Kaye. He'd long been one of my favorite film stars, but that soured me on him for quite a bit.

MarySwiss
08-06-2010, 12:25 AM
Based on what I've read in that book, you're probably right. That was a time when the area surrounding the ballpark was perceived as dangerous and it kept fans away. I've heard about the Sox almost skipping off to Florida and to a lesser extent, Milwaukee, but I never knew they almost left for Seattle too.

There were some Denver discussions too.

Denver! You're right. Remember the 3-6 home games per year in Milwaukee before the Brewers moved there? The faded astroturf infield with the grass outfield? The eerieness and the echos in old park on a night in September with about 3,000 in the place and the Sox 30 games out? Bad times but I still loved it.


For fans under 25 or so, it's probably hard to believe that every time there was talk of a team leaving Chicago, it was the Sox rather than the perennial (sp? it's late!) losers up north. I'm sure that all of us who lived through those days hope they are gone forever!

Noneck
08-06-2010, 01:20 AM
For fans under 25 or so, it's probably hard to believe that every time there was talk of a team leaving Chicago, it was the Sox rather than the perennial (sp? it's late!) losers up north. I'm sure that all of us who lived through those days hope they are gone forever!

They were very annoying times. I knew if they left I would never follow them, as my father never followed the Chicago cardinals after they left. Actually he never followed football after that. I think about that at times and maybe I wouldnt have followed baseball if the Sox left.

PeteWard
08-06-2010, 01:51 AM
They were very annoying times. I knew if they left I would never follow them, as my father never followed the Chicago cardinals after they left. Actually he never followed football after that. I think about that at times and maybe I wouldnt have followed baseball if the Sox left.

I felt the same way back then --and so did my old man about the Cards even though he was at every Comiskey game when they won the NFL!

I slowed down following baseball after Einsdorf bought the Sox and really just stopped after they tore down the old park---which was easy as I was overseas. Then I came back and I enjoy watching the Sox more than ever. :bandance: