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View Full Version : "Big Ben" Davis attempting a comeback


JermaineDye05
07-26-2010, 12:42 AM
as a pitcher

Link (http://bats.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/one-last-shot-for-ben-davis/)

LongLiveFisk
07-26-2010, 12:57 AM
OMG, I had completely forgotten all about him. A.J. made it too easy. :D:

GregO23
07-26-2010, 01:06 AM
Good luck to him. Always liked him for some reason

TDog
07-26-2010, 02:43 AM
He seemed like a good guy. Catchers often have good arms and know a lot about pitching. Some very good pitching coaches have been catchers -- Ray Berres, for example.

It seems, though, that a lot of players who come up and can't hit well enough to stick are trying to come back as pitchers these days.

Madvora
07-26-2010, 08:02 AM
He should have made this decision when he was with the Sox, that way we could have kept his bat out of the lineup.

SOXSINCE'70
07-26-2010, 09:02 AM
Everyone wants to be Sergio Santos.At least it seems like it.

TomBradley72
07-26-2010, 09:50 AM
as a pitcher

Link (http://bats.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/one-last-shot-for-ben-davis/)

Well...he did hit like a pitcher.

TDog
07-26-2010, 03:54 PM
Everyone wants to be Sergio Santos.At least it seems like it.

Maybe if you only pay attention to the White Sox. Maybe everyone wants to be Carlos Marmol.

Marmol, who has had more success than Sergio Santos and had it before Santos, started out as a catcher. But Marmol was far from the first, even if he may currently be the most successful of people who transformed into pitchers after coming into professional baseball as position players.

Danny Murphy, who came up as a pitcher for the White Sox in 1969 and 1970 was a 19-year-old outfielder for the Cubs in 1962 and hit .200. He had a decent 1969 season in the White Sox bullpen, but 1970 ended his career. Skip Lockwood came up as a third-baseman with the Kansas City A's in 1965 at age 18, and actually played in 42 games but only hit .121. He emerged as a pitcher four years later with the Seattle Pilots and actually had a decent career out of the bullpen for a few teams.

Bobby Thigpen was The Sporting News All-American designated hitter when he played at Mississippi State. In the Alaska summer league showcasing amateurs, he played first base and hit way over .300, never throwing a pitch. The White Sox drafted him and pretty much never let him bat. In the majors, he had just one plate appearance, coming with the Phillies.

Many more failed hitters tried to become pitchers and failed pitchers tried to hang on as position players, and you generally don't hear about them. Bart Johnson tried to convert to the outfield after the Sox sent him down.

The media reported that Johnson was trying to do a "Babe Ruth," but Ruth was not a failed pitcher. The Yankees just wanted his bat in the lineup every day.

soxfanreggie
07-26-2010, 10:34 PM
Jeremy Accardo of the Blue Jays was also a shortstop in college with a great arm (95 mph+). This isn't uncommon anymore - but seen a lot more it seems position players going to be a pitcher rather than vice versatile (an "Ankiel").

Bobby Thigpen
07-26-2010, 11:25 PM
I think that Babe Ruth guy was a pitcher once...