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Carolina Kenny
07-02-2010, 07:27 PM
In 1932 Carey Selph, the White Sox thridbaseman, struck out only 9 times during the whole season. His string without a strikeout totaled 89 games, establishing a major league record.

Does anyone know if this record still stand?

He played a quick third base with outstanding range that contributed to his fairly high error rate. Had limited power and did not make it to the majors until age 27. Only played two years, and yet does he have a major league record, or at least a Sox record??

Mingo
07-02-2010, 09:06 PM
Joe Sewell had 3 strikeouts in 502 ABs in 1932 for the record. I don't know about this former Sox player, but I thought Nellie Fox had the Sox record at 11 in 1958.

FielderJones
07-02-2010, 09:06 PM
In 1932 Carey Selph, the White Sox thridbaseman, struck out only 9 times during the whole season. His string without a strikeout totaled 89 games, establishing a major league record.


According to this article (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCI/is_9_63/ai_n6154583/pg_2/), it did not establish a major league record which had been set three years earlier.

Carolina Kenny
07-02-2010, 09:56 PM
According to this article (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCI/is_9_63/ai_n6154583/pg_2/), it did not establish a major league record which had been set three years earlier.

Thanks, I guess he's just another in the long Sox history of illoustrious Sox Third sackers.

TheVulture
07-02-2010, 10:16 PM
Joe Sewell had 3 strikeouts in 502 ABs in 1932 for the record. I don't know about this former Sox player, but I thought Nellie Fox had the Sox record at 11 in 1958.

I don't know if it's a record, but Eddie Collins struck out 8 times in 632 PA appearances for the Sox in 1923. He managed to accomplish this feat despite taking enough pitches to draw 84 walks on the season.

To me, the most incredible season for lack of strikeouts may have been Yogi Berra's 1950 season. He whiffed only 12 times in 656 PA while managing to knock out 28 homeruns. I don't think anyone has come close to that kind of ratio.

TDog
07-03-2010, 03:09 AM
I don't know if it's a record, but Eddie Collins struck out 8 times in 632 PA appearances for the Sox in 1923. He managed to accomplish this feat despite taking enough pitches to draw 84 walks on the season.

To me, the most incredible season for lack of strikeouts may have been Yogi Berra's 1950 season. He whiffed only 12 times in 656 PA while managing to knock out 28 homeruns. I don't think anyone has come close to that kind of ratio.

Johnny Mize didn't come close to that ratio when he became the only man to hit more than 50 home runs with less than 50 strikeouts (51 home runs and 42 strikeouts in 1947). Mize also hit .302 that year and drove in 138 runs. He was third in the MVP voting.

Six years earlier, Ted Williams hit .406 and led the league with 36 home runs and was second behind Joe DiMaggio with 120 RBI. His 147 walks also led the league and gave him an on-base percentage of .553. But he was easier to strike out than Yogi Berra in 1950. In 606 plate appearances, Williams struck out 27 times. Ouch. He probably finished second in the MVP voting because he struck out so much.

DiMaggio was the MVP that year. He only hit 30 home runs and only hit .357 and only had an on-base percentage of .440, but he did lead the league in RBIs, and there was that gaudy hitting streak. And most impressively, he only struck out 13 times in 621 appearances.

But one more strikeout and two more home runs only just approaches Berra's 1950 home-run-to-strikeout ratio. Berra 1950 home-run-to-strikeout ratio was 2.33-to-1. DiMaggio's in 1941 was 2.31-to-1. Of course, Berra had one fewer strikeout in 35 more plate appearances.

And to think that when I was a kid, I once listened to Bill Melton strike out 10 times in a doubleheader

MisterB
07-03-2010, 03:16 AM
Just shows how in today's game nobody (playing or coaching) really gives a flying crap about just making contact an putting the ball in play.

In that 1950 season, there were only 2 hitters in baseball who had 100 or more strikeouts (both from Chicago teams: Gus Zernial with the Sox and Roy Smalley with the Cubs).

Last year there were 82 players with 100 or more, and one of those had over 200.

kufram
07-03-2010, 06:13 AM
Just shows how in today's game nobody (playing or coaching) really gives a flying crap about just making contact an putting the ball in play.

In that 1950 season, there were only 2 hitters in baseball who had 100 or more strikeouts (both from Chicago teams: Gus Zernial with the Sox and Roy Smalley with the Cubs).

Last year there were 82 players with 100 or more, and one of those had over 200.

DiMaggio was a decade before my earliest BB days. But Yogi was playing during my early teens. What a player he was. He was a charter member of the greatest team that I ever saw for 8-10 years.

Strikeouts just weren't really acceptable then and the contact hitter was possibly the most valuable guy you could have. I don't pine for the old days because, in my opinion, the changes that have been made generally have made the game better....(I wish Soccer could say the same!). But there are some things that have gone out of the game to it's loss, and the real art of bat control is one to some degree.

Clutch hitting is on the wane as well. There used to be more players that hit .250-.260 but had the ability to make more of their hits really matter... in game-changing situations. It ain't always how many you hit, but WHEN you hit 'em.