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Whitesox029
06-18-2010, 01:00 PM
Today the Sox play their first game in Washington D.C. since July 16, 1971 when Tommy John shut out the Senators on 5 hits with a final score of 2-0. Bill Melton drove in the game's only two runs off Senators starter Pete Broberg with one out in the top of the 6th after Sox RF Pat Kelly had led off the inning with a triple. The Sox moved to 39-48 with the win. John moved to 8-10...with a 2.99 ERA. Something tells me this team wasn't much better at hitting than our current version.

WhiteSoxFTW
06-18-2010, 01:08 PM
But, better at pitching. Hence the ERA.

LITTLE NELL
06-18-2010, 04:25 PM
1971 was the year the Sox turned the corner after 3 of the lousiest seasons in their history. Melton led the league in Home Runs and the team improved by 23 games finishing 79-83 after the 56-106 0f 1970. It was actually a pretty exciting year and built the foundation for the 72 run at the division, of course the addition of Dick Allen helped but we lost Melton for the last half with a bad back.

KenBerryGrab
06-18-2010, 04:41 PM
And 1971 marked the debut of the red uniforms!

white sox bill
06-18-2010, 04:58 PM
I was 11 yrs old the last time we played in Washington. Remember vividly Pat Kelly, TJ, Beltin Melton. I think the Sox were on some weak AM station, can't recall the call letters. Was Red Rusch still the broadcaster?

TDog
06-18-2010, 05:19 PM
I was 11 yrs old the last time we played in Washington. Remember vividly Pat Kelly, TJ, Beltin Melton. I think the Sox were on some weak AM station, can't recall the call letters. Was Red Rusch still the broadcaster?

The White Sox were on a network of FM stations, 1970 being so bad and the Cubs being so popular. WEAW out of Evanston was the flagship station, I believe. Bob Elson and Red Rush went to Oakland after the 1970 season. Harry Caray wanted out of Oakland and was looking for work closer to St. Louis, and all he could get was the White Sox job. Jack Drees was the television play-by-play announcer on WFLD, channel 32.

Pat Kelly was a good man. He later became an evangelist. He has since died. Bill Melton, of course, went on to do what he does on television, although he should have been given a full-time announcing job. Tommy John was traded for Dick Allen and will forever be remembered, not for winning 288 games, but for the surgery that repaired his injured arm. His ERA in seven seasons with the White Sox was 2.95, and his record was just 82-80. If the White Sox had not been so bad 1968-1970, John probably would have finished with 300 wins and a spot in the Hall of Fame.

The last time the White Sox played in Washington, Ted Williams was managing the Rangers.

white sox bill
06-18-2010, 05:24 PM
The White Sox were on a network of FM stations, 1970 being so bad and the Cubs being so popular. WEAW out of Evanston was the flagship station, I believe. Bob Elson and Red Rush went to Oakland after the 1970 season. Harry Caray wanted out of Oakland and was looking for work closer to St. Louis, and all he could get was the White Sox job. Jack Drees was the television play-by-play announcer on WFLD, channel 32.

Pat Kelly was a good man. He later became an evangelist. He has since died. Bill Melton, of course, went on to do what he does on television, although he should have been given a full-time announcing job. Tommy John was traded for Dick Allen and will forever be remembered, not for winning 288 games, but for the surgery that repaired his injured arm. His ERA in seven seasons with the White Sox was 2.95, and his record was just 82-80. If the White Sox had not been so bad 1968-1970, John probably would have finished with 300 wins and a spot in the Hall of Fame.

The last time the White Sox played in Washington, Ted Williams was managing the Rangers.
Wasn't Rush's line "How sweet it is!" after a Sox homer?

LITTLE NELL
06-18-2010, 05:58 PM
The White Sox were on a network of FM stations, 1970 being so bad and the Cubs being so popular. WEAW out of Evanston was the flagship station, I believe. Bob Elson and Red Rush went to Oakland after the 1970 season. Harry Caray wanted out of Oakland and was looking for work closer to St. Louis, and all he could get was the White Sox job. Jack Drees was the television play-by-play announcer on WFLD, channel 32.

Pat Kelly was a good man. He later became an evangelist. He has since died. Bill Melton, of course, went on to do what he does on television, although he should have been given a full-time announcing job. Tommy John was traded for Dick Allen and will forever be remembered, not for winning 288 games, but for the surgery that repaired his injured arm. His ERA in seven seasons with the White Sox was 2.95, and his record was just 82-80. If the White Sox had not been so bad 1968-1970, John probably would have finished with 300 wins and a spot in the Hall of Fame.

The last time the White Sox played in Washington, Ted Williams was managing the Rangers.

And Nellie Fox was one of his coaches

TDog
06-18-2010, 06:15 PM
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And Nellie Fox was one of his coaches

Wow, I can't believe I forgot that and that I typed Rangers instead of Senators or future-Rangers. I actually got Nellie Fox's autograph at a Texas Rangers game the next year, after the Senators moved. After batting practice, Fox was facing the big state-of-Texas-shaped scoreboard with a fungo bat. A young Rangers catcher was in a crouch behind him. Fox was hitting popups to the warning track behind home plate that the catcher was fielding. It was one of the coolest coaching things I ever saw. I can only imagine what sort of bat control Fox must have had when he played for the White Sox.

I had brought a hardcover copy of Williams' book The Science of Hitting hoping to get it signed, but I settled for Nellie Fox signing my program that night after he finished hitting popups to the catcher.

Whitesox029
06-18-2010, 11:38 PM
Yeah, I was telling my dad about this last game and he said the same thing about how the Sox started to turn it around that year. He was also 11 at the time.

soxinem1
06-19-2010, 07:27 AM
The last time the White Sox played in Washington, Ted Williams was managing the Rangers.

http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/si_online/covers/images/1969/0317_large.jpg

'You mean Senators, right?':smile:

TommyJohn
06-19-2010, 08:50 AM
The White Sox were on a network of FM stations, 1970 being so bad and the Cubs being so popular. WEAW out of Evanston was the flagship station, I believe. Bob Elson and Red Rush went to Oakland after the 1970 season. Harry Caray wanted out of Oakland and was looking for work closer to St. Louis, and all he could get was the White Sox job. Jack Drees was the television play-by-play announcer on WFLD, channel 32.

Pat Kelly was a good man. He later became an evangelist. He has since died. Bill Melton, of course, went on to do what he does on television, although he should have been given a full-time announcing job. Tommy John was traded for Dick Allen and will forever be remembered, not for winning 288 games, but for the surgery that repaired his injured arm. His ERA in seven seasons with the White Sox was 2.95, and his record was just 82-80. If the White Sox had not been so bad 1968-1970, John probably would have finished with 300 wins and a spot in the Hall of Fame.

The last time the White Sox played in Washington, Ted Williams was managing the Rangers.
I wasn't aware that John's career ERA for the Sox was that low. He played on some awful Sox teams after 1967.

I would have to say his best season for the White Sox was 1968. He was with the team part-time while serving in the Indiana National Guard. He was the team's lone rep at the All-Star Game in Houston that year. He was 10-5 with a 1.88 ERA for a team that would finish in 9th place. He would have done better except that one night in Detroit he threw high at Dick McAuliffe, who charged the mound. When he got there he kneed John in the shoulder, causing it to separate. John was out for the season. Meanwhile Dickie was given a li'l tap on his wristie (5 game suspension-served when the Tigers went to Chicago) and played in that year's World Series.