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LITTLE NELL
06-05-2010, 12:18 PM
Just watched it again for the umteenth time and got me to thinking since Selig did not overturn the result of the perfect game in Detroit the other night. The 8 Sox were found not guilty in a court of law, if this happenned in this day and age with a not guilty verdict and with the players union around and tons of media hype etc, would Selig still ban the 8? I say no he would not. He would take the easy way out and say the courts have spoken.

Fenway
06-05-2010, 01:02 PM
I have often wondered what Landis would have done if Comiskey hadn't gotten cold feet and made the trade with Boston - George Herman for Shoeless.

Didn't the 'stolen' confessions show up years later in Comiskey's office?

I as well watched the movie recently as Comcast has it as a freebie.

Humming - I'm forever blowing ballgames

John Mahoney and Studs Turkle were fantastic in that flick.

To this day I wince when I walk past the Buckminster Hotel in Boston knowing that is where the fix was planned. Irony is the hotel bar is now an Uno's Chicago Grille.

TheOldRoman
06-05-2010, 01:14 PM
I don't think there is any way it would fly today with the power of the MLBPA. And we had a thread come up a few times on this recent, apparently much of the book "8 Men Out" (which had difference from the movie) was fiction. A few Chicago lawyers investigated it, and the facts they uncovered look a lot less damning, at least for Shoeless Joe.

TDog
06-05-2010, 01:19 PM
Just watched it again for the umteenth time and got me to thinking since Selig did not overturn the result of the perfect game in Detroit the other night. The 8 Sox were found not guilty in a court of law, if this happenned in this day and age with a not guilty verdict and with the players union around and tons of media hype etc, would Selig still ban the 8? I say no he would not. He would take the easy way out and say the courts have spoken.

Landis later banned the White Sox pitcher who won two games in that World Series, among others. He ejected a player from a World Series game, and not because the player did anything wrong. But even though he sat in the front row of all World Series games and thousands of other baseball games, and saw calls that he disagreed with, he never reversed an umpire's call.
Landis abused his power. He had to die before baseball could integrate. But I don't believe he would have overturned the call against Galarraga.

As for the Black Sox scandal, I've read the transcripts of Joe Jackson's grand jury testimony. People want to believe he was innocent. Buck Weaver was, but I don't believe Jackson was.

WhiteSoxOnly
06-05-2010, 01:42 PM
Landis later banned the White Sox pitcher who won two games in that World Series, among others. He ejected a player from a World Series game, and not because the player did anything wrong. But even though he sat in the front row of all World Series games and thousands of other baseball games, and saw calls that he disagreed with, he never reversed an umpire's call.
Landis abused his power. He had to die before baseball could integrate. But I don't believe he would have overturned the call against Galarraga.

As for the Black Sox scandal, I've read the transcripts of Joe Jackson's grand jury testimony. People want to believe he was innocent. Buck Weaver was, but I don't believe Jackson was.

Jackson may have not been the brightest guy,but he knew how to count money.His stats might suggest that he didn't lay down to the extent of those other slobs either.But he was guilty.Weaver just didn't want to rat anybody else out even though he knew what was going on.And it wasn't beneath the scumbag criminals of that day to get a message to Weaver to keep his yap shut or else.

SI1020
06-05-2010, 03:16 PM
As for the Black Sox scandal, I've read the transcripts of Joe Jackson's grand jury testimony. People want to believe he was innocent. Buck Weaver was, but I don't believe Jackson was. I agree. The Black Sox scandal is a very complicated multi layered event hard to understand in its totality, but it's hard to come to any other conclusion than 7 players conspired in words and deed to throw the WS, and Jackson was one of them. This behavior continued into the 1920 season.

Fenway
06-05-2010, 03:28 PM
The trailer

F2t7gEx-MEs

theamb
06-05-2010, 09:47 PM
Just watched it again for the umteenth time and got me to thinking since Selig did not overturn the result of the perfect game in Detroit the other night. The 8 Sox were found not guilty in a court of law, if this happenned in this day and age with a not guilty verdict and with the players union around and tons of media hype etc, would Selig still ban the 8? I say no he would not. He would take the easy way out and say the courts have spoken.

People wrongly assume that if Selig overturned the Galarraga call(which he should have, due to his fault for not installing full instant replay earlier) that "Pandora's Box" would open and he would have to overturn every single call from A.J.'s gift in '05 to the Black Sox.

All he had to do to was state that the Galarraga is a one-time decision and that's final. But he would still prefer to live in the past than the present.

I don't recall the NFL overturning any past calls when they introduced instant replay. Nor the NBA or NHL. But why mess with a sport so "pure" as baseball :rolleyes:

kaufsox
06-06-2010, 08:55 PM
interesting take, and I agree that Selig wouldn't pull the trigger. Having said that, in today's day and age fixing the Series probably wouldn't involve the players like in 1919. Also the "shady" court dealings would be a little harder to pull off, not saying they couldn't but with the media etc. that's been mentioned I don't know if such inconsistencies would fly. maybe, I suppose.

Oblong
06-07-2010, 08:12 AM
One of my favorite movies ever and it was disappointing to read here a while back about a lot of it being fiction. It's still a great movie but unfortunately a lot of people will get their history from it. I remember reading some type of connection with John Sayles (who played Ring Lardner) and Ring Lardner Jr. I think maybe he made a movie about him. I'll look it up.

That's the last of what I called the Chicago Trilogy from my adolescence. Ferris Beuller in 86, The Untouchables in 87, and Eight Men Out in 88. I wanted to move to Chicago so bad because of those 3 movies.