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GAsoxfan
05-29-2010, 02:25 PM
Swisher was on second when A-Rod hit a line drive that caromed off the pitcher's head and went into right field. While Huff (the pitcher) lay motionless on the mound, Swisher continued to run the bases and ended up scoring on the play. My question is: was it poor form for Swisher to continue to run the bases when the pitcher was clearly injured, or is that just part of the game?

EDIT: The original story on ESPN listed Swisher at 1B, but after watching the clip, he was on second. That makes it better IMO.

JermaineDye05
05-29-2010, 02:30 PM
Swisher was on first when A-Rod hit a line drive that caromed off the pitcher's head and went into right field. While Huff (the pitcher) lay motionless on the mound, Swisher continued to run the bases and ended up scoring on the play. My question is: was it poor form for Swisher to continue to run the bases when the pitcher was clearly injured, or is that just part of the game?

It wasn't just Swish. It was everyone. A-Rod didn't even look at Huff until he stopped at second base. I think it was in bad form.

Coops4Aces
05-29-2010, 02:38 PM
A-Rod knew exactly what happened, but what's he supposed to do? Stop running? There was nothing he could do for the guy. You have to finish the play.

LITTLE NELL
05-29-2010, 03:05 PM
Not bad form; thats baseball.
Hockey at one time was the same way, no matter how serious the injury was, play continued until a whistle was blown due to icing or offsides or any other reason. A player could be on the ice bleeding to death but play continued.

JermaineDye05
05-29-2010, 03:08 PM
Not bad form; thats baseball.
Hockey at one time was the same way, no matter how serious the injury was, play continued until a whistle was blown due to icing or offsides or any other reason. A player could be on the ice bleeding to death but play continued.

Excuse my language but **** the game. The well being of another person far outweighs the outcome of a game.

hi im skot
05-29-2010, 03:10 PM
You have to finish the play.

I don't like A-Rod or Swisher, but you play until time is called.

EDIT: Notice that as Swisher crossed the plate he appeared to be calling for help, or at the very least showing some concern. Rodriguez came over to check on him as well.

LITTLE NELL
05-29-2010, 03:12 PM
Excuse my language but **** the game. The well being of another person far outweighs the outcome of a game.

I agree, thats why the rule in hockey was changed.
I don't know what you would do in baseball, do you call the play dead and let the runners advance one base.
It seems like pitchers getting beaned is happening a lot more as of late and MLB is going to have to address the issue.

TDog
05-29-2010, 03:53 PM
It was Swisher's job to run around the bases. It wasn't bad form. It was his job.

My father, a couple of months before I was born, saw Gil McDougald hit Herb Score with a line drive that turned one of the best young pitchers in baseball into a lousy, future White Sox pitcher. I asked him if McDougald ran to first or to the mound, but he said he didn't remember. But I'm guessing McDougald ran to first before seeing if Score was OK.

Of course, in 1976, Ron LeFlore ran to first when his line drive left Wilbur Wood screaming in pain. LeFlore had been the only hitter to reach base against Wilbur Wood that day, so there was no one on base. When Ken Berry was knocked unconscious with the bases loaded while trying to field a Carlos May line drive in Old Comiskey in 1971, everyone ran around the bases and Carlos May had what I believe was the first inside-the-park grand slam in franchise history.

It isn't that people don't care. McDougald, I read, vowed to retire if Score was blinded by his line drive. Usually such events send hitters into slumps. Harold Baines was red hot when he hit a pitcher (I've forgotten who). He immediately went into a two-week hitting slump.

It seems cold, but Swisher did exactly what the Yankees are paying him to do.

SI1020
05-29-2010, 04:06 PM
I you look at the video both runners showed concern for the fallen Indians pitcher. Swisher waved at the mound for help as he crossed the plate and Rodriguez looked pained at the sight of the pitcher laying on the mound. I find it both strange and ironic that in addition to this, the Ray Chapman and Herb Score incidents involved the Yankees and the Indians. Score was on his way to a HOF career and Chapman of course died as a result of his beaning.

Huisj
05-29-2010, 04:21 PM
For another instance of a superstar hitting a pitcher, check out this article from a few days ago looking back at when Pujols hit Chris Young with a liner a few years back. It's a good read.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/may/27/i-never-saw-it-i-just-felt-it/

jabrch
05-29-2010, 05:34 PM
Players are taught to play until the play is over. If the coaches/trainers/etc. ran out on the field, I'd have no problem with that either, but what is a baserunner supposed to do? Run out of the baselines to...do....what exactly? Stop? Advance until the umps tell you play is dead. That's the way the game goes.

JermaineDye05
05-29-2010, 05:36 PM
Players are taught to play until the play is over. If the coaches/trainers/etc. ran out on the field, I'd have no problem with that either, but what is a baserunner supposed to do? Run out of the baselines to...do....what exactly? Stop? Advance until the umps tell you play is dead. That's the way the game goes.

I just feel in a situation where a player is struck in the head with a line drive, it should be treated as a hbp. Ball is dead, the batter gets first base.

Craig Grebeck
05-29-2010, 05:39 PM
I just feel in a situation where a player is struck in the head with a line drive, it should be treated as a hbp. Ball is dead, the batter gets first base.
Then change the goddamn rules. Until then, the two Yanks were in the right.

JermaineDye05
05-29-2010, 05:44 PM
Then change the goddamn rules. Until then, the two Yanks were in the right.

That's what baseball should do given the recent increase in these particular occurrences. I also wouldn't be against an update with the current caps to some way make them more resistant to a line drive. Or just have pitchers wear the helmets like the base coaches wear. I seem to recall John Olerud wearing one when he would play first base.

jabrch
05-29-2010, 05:50 PM
I just feel in a situation where a player is struck in the head with a line drive, it should be treated as a hbp. Ball is dead, the batter gets first base.

If that were the rules - then that would be the right play. It isn't - hope the kid is OK.

TDog
05-29-2010, 06:05 PM
I just feel in a situation where a player is struck in the head with a line drive, it should be treated as a hbp. Ball is dead, the batter gets first base.

If that's supposed to be an analogy, it doesn't ring true. If a pitch that only grazes a hitter's uniform it's a dead ball. The ball is dead because base runners should not be able to advance on a ball not put into play but deflected by an offensive player. The dead ball is not based on the potential that a player may be injured. Pitchers get hit by batted balls just about every day somewhere in the majors. Often they get assists, even if the ball only grazes them. A batted ball hit Mark Buehrle on opening day, and people still talk about the play he made on it.

If two players chasing after a flyball run into each other and knock each other out, the ball isn't ruled dead so the injured can be attended to.

Maybe you could put up a batting practice screen to protect the pitcher while the game is being played. The fact is, part of pitching is living with the knowledge that a line drive could kill you, just as part of hitting is living with the knowledge that a batted ball could kill you. Some batters have to deal with the knowledge that they could kill a pitcher who is throwing a ball that could kill them.

This is hardball.

SI1020
05-29-2010, 06:52 PM
This is hardball. Hopefully it will remain that way.

hi im skot
05-30-2010, 02:17 PM
All is well. (http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=130404706972189&id=119600491386603)

Brian26
05-30-2010, 02:21 PM
If two players chasing after a flyball run into each other and knock each other out, the ball isn't ruled dead so the injured can be attended to.

Correct. I'll always remember seeing Ron Cey hit an inside-the-park homer at Wrigley in the mid 80s after Dave Parker slammed into the rightfield brick wall and knocked himself out.

WhiteSoxJunkie
05-30-2010, 10:18 PM
I don't think it was bad form to continue running. If MLB decides to institute a rule where runners may only advance one base on similar situations, I would not have a problem with that.

g0g0
06-01-2010, 08:38 AM
Not bad form at all IMO. Unless maybe Swisher is a doctor...:tongue:

Jerko
06-01-2010, 08:49 AM
In hockey, the play doesn't stop until the injured guy's team gets the puck, unless it's an OBVIOUS injury. Then an official can stop play immediately. They changed this rule IIRC because Kovalev faked being injured while Quebec was scoring a goal and the goal was called off. I found the article.

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/05/14/sports/on-hockey-nordiques-holler-about-officials-use-of-ranger-rules.html


BTW, I don't think it was bad form for Swisher or A-Rod to run the bases.

october23sp
06-01-2010, 09:04 AM
BTW, I don't think there has been an increase of pitchers being hit in the head, when it happens people are always quick to say, "something needs to be done."

TheVulture
06-01-2010, 03:23 PM
I just feel in a situation where a player is struck in the head with a line drive, it should be treated as a hbp. Ball is dead, the batter gets first base.

How in the world is that going to help the struck player any? Thanks for stopping at first, my head feels much better as a result? Makes no sense.

downstairs
06-01-2010, 03:40 PM
Not bad form. Swish and A-Rod couldn't have helped him. Let the medical staff run onto the field, but the runner has got to keep running.

Noneck
06-01-2010, 03:43 PM
I seem to recall John Olerud wearing one when he would play first base.

Dick Allen did also. But it wasnt to protect him from a baseball but from objects thrown at him from those "great" Philadelphia fans.

TDog
06-01-2010, 03:47 PM
Not bad form at all IMO. Unless maybe Swisher is a doctor...:tongue:

Yes, it would have been bad form for Moonlight Graham not to give up baseball to save the life of Karin Kinsella in the movie Field of Dreams.

Nick Swisher or Alex Rodriguez not running after David Huff was hit in the head with a line drive would have been bad base running.

eriqjaffe
06-01-2010, 03:48 PM
Of course, in 1976, Ron LeFlore ran to first when his line drive left Wilbur Wood screaming in pain. LeFlore had been the only hitter to reach base against Wilbur Wood that day, so there was no one on base. If you believe in Karma, I was at the game when LeFlore got taken out by a fly ball off the bat of Red Sox catcher Gary Allenson back in '82. Not sure if he lost consciousness or not (it was pretty deep in center, and we were sitting right in the far left-field corner, so the deeper part of center wasn't easily visible), but Allenson came all the way around and scored on an E-8.

asindc
06-01-2010, 03:50 PM
To answer the question posed in the thread title: Not.

BadBobbyJenks
06-01-2010, 03:56 PM
He definitely should have stopped and played the role of opposing teams' trainer.

Frontman
06-01-2010, 04:15 PM
So A-Rod/Swisher finishing the play is bad form; yet Lance Berkman finishing out a player earlier this season ISN'T bad form?

Can we be SLIGHTLY more biased against the Yankees? A-rod also finished off a play when his own pitcher was beaned earlier this season; should that not count as a catch and an out?

You finish the play because as it stands, right now; MLB doesn't have a rule for stopping of play due to injury, period. Sorry to be callous; but that's how the game is currently constructed. 5-10 years from now if Selig finally decides to address the beaned pitcher situation?

Might be different then. Granted; he hasn't addressed the maple-exploding-shrapnel-across-the-diamond-cooked bats yet, so don't hold your breath for him to change anything any time soon.