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View Full Version : Best Moment of Sunday's Game


Brian26
04-18-2010, 11:26 PM
The AFLAC trivia question was "which pitcher threw the last pitch ever in Cleveland's Municipal Stadium (hint: Sox vs. Tribe in 1993)."

Answer: Jose DeLeon.

Stone: "Jose Deleon...who's claim to fame is that he was traded for Bobby Bonilla."

(20 second pause)

Hawk: "..."

If Hawk had an ounce of self-deprecating humor, he could have said something clever, but unfortunately he refused to acknowledge the comment. Stone seemed to be doing it in jest, so that made Hawk look like an even bigger ass than just hoping nobody watching understood the reference.

soltrain21
04-18-2010, 11:28 PM
The AFLAC trivia question was "which pitcher threw the last pitch ever in Cleveland's Municipal Stadium (hint: Sox vs. Tribe in 1993)."

Answer: Jose DeLeon.

Stone: "Jose Deleon...who's claim to fame is that he was traded for Bobby Bonilla."

(20 second pause)

Hawk: "..."

If Hawk had an ounce of self-deprecating humor, he could have said something clever, but unfortunately he refused to acknowledge the comment. Stone seemed to be doing it in jest, so that made Hawk look like an even bigger ass than just hoping nobody watching understood the reference.

And then eventually Hawk started telling this very long story about playing in an old timers game at the age of 30 and Stone just kept saying "yep." It was so obvious Stone wasn't listening to a word he said.

Thome_Fan
04-18-2010, 11:30 PM
Could someone explain the joke to us younger folks in the audience? :tongue:

GoGoCrede
04-18-2010, 11:34 PM
Could someone explain the joke to us younger folks in the audience? :tongue:

Thank you, I'm confused too. :D:

LoveYourSuit
04-18-2010, 11:35 PM
Could someone explain the joke to us younger folks in the audience? :tongue:

Hawk was the GM who made the trade, I believe.

soltrain21
04-18-2010, 11:35 PM
Pretty sure Bonilla got traded from the White Sox for Jose DeLeon when Hawk was the GM. So Stone was taking a jab at the horrible move Hawk made.

Thome_Fan
04-18-2010, 11:36 PM
Pretty sure Bonilla got traded from the White Sox for Jose DeLeon when Hawk was the GM. So Stone was taking a jab at the horrible move Hawk made.

Gotcha. That is funny. Thanks!

GoGoCrede
04-18-2010, 11:36 PM
Hawk was the GM who made the trade, I believe.

:rolling: I should have known...

Dick Allen
04-18-2010, 11:37 PM
The Sox GM who made the trade - Hawk Harrelson.

LoveYourSuit
04-18-2010, 11:43 PM
To Hawk's credit today, this might have been the first time he has taken off his company mouth piece and said "We stink" on the air when describing the Sox.

Rdy2PlayBall
04-19-2010, 12:08 AM
To Hawk's credit today, this might have been the first time he has taken off his company mouth piece and said "We stink" on the air when describing the Sox.Did he really say that? I only remember him saying "we are in a funk" ... did he say it under his breath and I missed it?

DirtySox
04-19-2010, 12:15 AM
Did he really say that? I only remember him saying "we are in a funk" ... did he say it under his breath and I missed it?

He did indeed. Clear as day.

Rdy2PlayBall
04-19-2010, 12:16 AM
He did indeed. Clear as day.Aww... :(:

Rohan
04-19-2010, 12:20 AM
He did indeed. Clear as day.

See... That's just depressing.

DirtySox
04-19-2010, 12:21 AM
See... That's just depressing.

Probably the most noteworthy thing he's said in a long time.

Mohoney
04-19-2010, 08:35 AM
We ended up trading for DeLeon again, sending Bobby Thigpen to the Phillies.

TDog
04-19-2010, 01:23 PM
Pretty sure Bonilla got traded from the White Sox for Jose DeLeon when Hawk was the GM. So Stone was taking a jab at the horrible move Hawk made.

I hope people don't find this to be too long and too self-indulgent, but I believe there is more to the story.

Harrelson actually selected Bonilla in the Rule 5 draft from the Pirates, and Bonilla made his major league debut with the White Sox. He had never played higher than AA and had been demoted back to A ball for the 185 season. He seemed to have potential as a hitter, but he was inconsistent and overall deemed not ready for the majors. He had never hit over .265, and despite his batting practice power, never hit many home run. With the White Sox, he hit in the .260s and played quite a bit though mid-July, he was expected to do better. He only hit a couple of home runs, though the White Sox hoped for more. He really didn't have a position. LaRussa had him playing all over the outfield and first base, and didn't play any position well. They didn't have room for a rookie at DH because, like most White Sox teams, they had too many veterans who were best suited for DH.

The problem was that they couldn't send Bonilla down, having selected him in the Rule 5 Draft. If they didn't keep him on the 25-man roster, they would have to return him to Pittsburgh. That was such an awful year. Harrelson finally fired LaRussa and Jim Fregosi emerged as the White Sox manager. Fregosi is as good a judge of baseball talent as there is, and I don't know if he had anything to do with the Sox trading Bonilla. He might have gone to Harrelson saying he needed pitching, because he most certainly did need pitching.

At the time, Jose DeLeon was considered an underachiever in Pittsburgh, a good young pitcher on the verge of being great if he could just get his act together and trust his stuff. Vin Scully told a story that he overheard about Jim Leyland telling DeLeon that he was going to "have to pitch inside," to which DeLeon asked if he was being traded to Houston.

Harrelson, who had a relationship with Leyland, might have thought he was solving the quesion of what to do with Bonilla while stealing a pitcher on the verge of great things. History tells us that it didn't work out that way. Bonilla didn't go back to the minors, but he didn't find himself as a hitter with the Pirates until the next season when it finally clicked and he started hitting better than he ever did in the minors. DeLeon would only show flashes of pitching the way people believed he eventually could.

It shouldn't be forgotten that DeLeon was traded to the Cardinals for Lance Johnson and future opening-day starter Ricky Horton before he was released, signed by the Phillies (who were managed by Fregosi, come to think of it) and traded back to the White Sox.

I only have one great Jose DeLeon memory of his time with the White Sox and it came during his second stint with the team. On August 7, 1994, the Sunday before the strike ended the season with the Sox 1 game ahead of Cleveland, I was sitting down the first-base line in Anaheim. Alex Fernandez had a miserable day. The Sox were down 5-1 after 3, but Fernandez settled down and pitched through 7, holding the Angels at 5. The Sox scored 2 in the fifth on a Frank Thomas double, pushing him over 100 RBIs for the season, but it looked like I would drive home to Arizona with a rare Anaheim loss. Darrin Jackson singled to lead off the ninth, but Lance Johnson flied out. Spanky LaValliere, a doubleplay threat had a 3-2 count when he lifted a Russ Springer pitch down the first-base line. I can still see it carrying lazily before bouncing off the back wall behind the fence.

Meanwhile, DeLeon, who came in with 2 on and 2 out in the bottom of the Angels eighth to hold the game at 5-3, came out for the bottom of the ninth and sent the game into extra innings. He held the Angels scoreless in the 10th and 11th before Ozzie Guillen led off White Sox 12th with a triple. Technically, the game-winner was Joey Cora's single that followed, but Guillen would also drive in a run later that inning with a single to cap the 5-run rally.

And DeLeon came back out to finish the game, pitching with a margin for error for the first time. He made quick work of it. He ended up striking out 5 and giving up just 1 hit in 4.1 innings. That's the Jose DeLeon I remember, and, while it doesn't rank with the great moments in White Sox history, that's the game I think of when I think of the 1994 season.