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View Full Version : 35th Street Metra stop update


doublem23
11-13-2009, 10:02 PM
Looks like work will start Monday now, with the demolition of the Mies van der Rohe building at the NW corner of 35th & Federal.

http://featuresblogs.chicagotribune.com/theskyline/2009/11/mies-building-at-iit-will-come-down-for-metra-station.html

JNS
11-14-2009, 10:23 AM
Looks like work will start Monday now, with the demolition of the Mies van der Rohe building at the NW corner of 35th & Federal.

http://featuresblogs.chicagotribune.com/theskyline/2009/11/mies-building-at-iit-will-come-down-for-metra-station.html


Yeah, it's a Mies building - more like - as Kamin put it - like a hut. I walk by it (from my super-top-secret-parking-spot) every game I go to. Never even noticed it - at least not in the context of great architecture. I have mixed feelings at best about Mies and all Bauhaus/Le Corbusier-influenced architecture anyhow, but how anyone could get upset about a windowless rectangular utility shed getting ripped is beyond me. 99% shot that one of his lesser students did the actual "design" and drawing.

voodoochile
11-14-2009, 10:35 AM
Yeah, it's a Mies building - more like - as Kamin put it - like a hut. I walk by it (from my super-top-secret-parking-spot) every game I go to. Never even noticed it - at least not in the context of great architecture. I have mixed feelings at best about Mies and all Bauhaus/Le Corbusier-influenced architecture anyhow, but how anyone could get upset about a windowless rectangular utility shed getting ripped is beyond me. 99% shot that one of his lesser students did the actual "design" and drawing.

His designs are all pretty blah. He's a leading influence in "modern" styles of buildings with less ornamentation and boxy straight-lined designs. Never been a huge fan of his work, but he's famous.

Give me a good Frank Lloyd Wright any day of the week...

doublem23
11-14-2009, 11:37 AM
Give me a good Frank Lloyd Wright any day of the week...

Frank Lloyd Wright's work is obviously more beautiful but he has the benefit of working on generally smaller scales. As much as I love the Prairie Style of Architecture, it's unrealistic to build anything larger than a small apartment building in that style.

I know when most people think of Mies van der Rohe, they think of soaring, "boxy" buildings like IBM Plaza or Kluczynski Federal Building, but he has a few pieces of smaller work, like the Farnsworth House (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farnsworth_House), that are truly beautiful.

BleacherBandit
11-14-2009, 11:49 AM
I don't understand how that building could have been designed by even van der Rohe. It's a brick hut...it looks like it could have been drawn up by any 1960's city planner. I even enjoy van der Rohe's buildings, especially the federal building and its plaza.

SaltyPretzel
11-14-2009, 12:39 PM
Which is more impressive, this?:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ce/Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg/755px-Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ce/Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg)
Or this?:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3095/3219397046_ff4a5eaced.jpg

JNS
11-14-2009, 01:36 PM
His designs are all pretty blah. He's a leading influence in "modern" styles of buildings with less ornamentation and boxy straight-lined designs. Never been a huge fan of his work, but he's famous.

Give me a good Frank Lloyd Wright any day of the week...


Some of Mies stuff is good and his interiors are very well done - efficient and well-designed. Wright stuff looks great, but try living in one. I know someone who grew up in a Wright prairie house in Glencoe, complete with [extremely uncomfortable] Wright furniture and she always talked about what a PITA it was to live in one. His materials and QC were lousy - lot's of sub-standard pre-stressed concrete that leaked after about 25 years - and lots of difficult to use spaces. Great looking, but not so great to live in. His very early stuff is different - there are a couple of very early houses on the 4800 block of Kenwood that are fantastic inside and out.

The big Mies-designed tower block directly East of the hut they are raising is pretty bad inside. I'm talking about the IIT building that used to be called the Gas Institute on the NW corner of 35th and State. It looks like a standard Mies building on the outside, but the interior construction is very basic and ugly - just a maze of cinder-blocks. So yeah, get rid of the hut and put the station in so the good burgers of Beverly and points South can drink at the games and not need to have a designated driver!

I should add that Mies had a habit of blaming his less successful designs on his students; "it was a bad class that year," or something to that affect. The Algonquin Apartments on Hyde Park Blvd and Cornell - locally referred to as the Indian Village - were blamed on his students.

soxgirl617
11-15-2009, 09:42 AM
I work in a Mies building (330 N. Wabash, formerly known as the IBM Building). I really enjoy the clean lines of the design, and the soaring, almost three story tall lobby, with gorgeous marble. The light in the building is fantastic, too, thanks to the floor to ceiling windows on all sides. There are some practical problems, such as an inefficient ventilation system. All of the ventilation is placed at floor level around the perimeter of the building. The blowers are quite loud, but the bigger problem is that it is difficult to maintain comfortable temperatures (either cool or warm) in the interior of the floors, b/c there's no ventilation there. Some of that is likely a reflection of the time when the building was constructed (opened in 1971, after Mies' death in 1969). All in all, though, I really like working in such a beautiful building.

But the brick hut on 35th certainly isn't a loss!

JNS
11-15-2009, 11:09 AM
I work in a Mies building (330 N. Wabash, formerly known as the IBM Building). I really enjoy the clean lines of the design, and the soaring, almost three story tall lobby, with gorgeous marble. The light in the building is fantastic, too, thanks to the floor to ceiling windows on all sides. There are some practical problems, such as an inefficient ventilation system. All of the ventilation is placed at floor level around the perimeter of the building. The blowers are quite loud, but the bigger problem is that it is difficult to maintain comfortable temperatures (either cool or warm) in the interior of the floors, b/c there's no ventilation there. Some of that is likely a reflection of the time when the building was constructed (opened in 1971, after Mies' death in 1969). All in all, though, I really like working in such a beautiful building.

But the brick hut on 35th certainly isn't a loss!

He was known for demanding real craftsmanship when doing the interiors. Well built and easy to live or work in. Your point about the ventilation is pretty typical of buildings built around that time and earlier - a somewhat later too.

The problem is, he's extremely influential, or was and other architects are not as meticulous about designing utile, well designed interiors, so it ends up being a piece of ****.

None of which applies to a utility shed on 35th street!

Hitmen77
11-15-2009, 12:27 PM
Which is more impressive, this?:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ce/Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg/755px-Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ce/Chicago_Federal_Court%2C_1961.jpg)
Or this?:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3095/3219397046_ff4a5eaced.jpg

Am I right that the first building was torn down an replaced with the 2nd building - at the Federal Plaza on Dearborn and Adams?

I'm not a big fan of Mies van der Rohe buildings. One or two of them mixed into great city skyline like Chicago is fine. But a too many of his buildings together start to look like cold, depressing "Eastern Bloc" high rises.

The van der Rohe designed IIT campus looks terrible and I've heard quite a few people in the past mistake them for the neighboring housing projects.

I can't believe anyone would complain about the building that was being torn down to make way for the Metra stop.

Viva Medias B's
11-15-2009, 03:54 PM
Having visited a number of major Frank Lloyd Wright venues, I prefer Wright buildings to Mies buildings, but that does not mean Mies buildings are bad. What I like about his buildings on the Federal Plaza is that all the lines on the plaza line up perfectly with the window seams in the Dirksen Federal Building, Kluczynski Federal Building, and the U.S. Post Office. One other interesting series of buildings Mies designed are a pair of apartment/condo buildings on Lake Shore Drive just south of the Oak Street Beach curve.

jamokes
11-15-2009, 03:59 PM
Boy was this thread ever hijacked...................it will be very nice to have a Metra stop right at 35th, just in time for them to raise the prices again.

DSpivack
11-15-2009, 03:59 PM
Having visited a number of major Frank Lloyd Wright venues, I prefer Wright buildings to Mies buildings, but that does not mean Mies buildings are bad. What I like about his buildings on the Federal Plaza is that all the lines on the plaza line up perfectly with the window seams in the Dirksen Federal Building, Kluczynski Federal Building, and the U.S. Post Office. One other interesting series of buildings Mies designed are a pair of apartment/condo buildings on Lake Shore Drive just south of the Oak Street Beach curve.

Prairie Shores?

doublem23
11-15-2009, 04:07 PM
Prairie Shores?

I think VM is referring to 860-880 Lake Shore Drive.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/860-880_Lake_Shore_Drive.jpg/250px-860-880_Lake_Shore_Drive.jpg

DSpivack
11-15-2009, 04:13 PM
I think VM is referring to 860-880 Lake Shore Drive.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/860-880_Lake_Shore_Drive.jpg/250px-860-880_Lake_Shore_Drive.jpg

Oh, right, by NU. :redface:

Ranger
11-15-2009, 08:15 PM
I work in a Mies building (330 N. Wabash, formerly known as the IBM Building). I really enjoy the clean lines of the design, and the soaring, almost three story tall lobby, with gorgeous marble. The light in the building is fantastic, too, thanks to the floor to ceiling windows on all sides. There are some practical problems, such as an inefficient ventilation system. All of the ventilation is placed at floor level around the perimeter of the building. The blowers are quite loud, but the bigger problem is that it is difficult to maintain comfortable temperatures (either cool or warm) in the interior of the floors, b/c there's no ventilation there. Some of that is likely a reflection of the time when the building was constructed (opened in 1971, after Mies' death in 1969). All in all, though, I really like working in such a beautiful building.

But the brick hut on 35th certainly isn't a loss!

This is the building you're talking about, right?:

http://jonathanfordten.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/338px-2004-09-02_1580x2800_chicago_ibm_building.jpg

They used that building for a few different scenes in The Dark Knight. They used the lobby for a press conference scene and then I believe they used it (the lobby) for Wayne's penthouse (CGI to make it look like the floor was up high). I'm also pretty sure they used some higher floors for other scenes, too, because you can see Hotel Monaco and the Seventeenth Church of Christ in the background (the odd circular building on Wabash and Wacker).

1989
11-15-2009, 10:07 PM
Is the building that supposed to be torn down that old, red brick building on the other side of the Dan Ryan?

Brian26
11-15-2009, 10:12 PM
Give this a moment to load. I believe the street-view will pop up and show you the building.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=35th&sll=41.831256,-87.629431&sspn=0.001663,0.003449&gl=us&ie=UTF8&radius=0.09&rq=1&ev=zi&hq=35th&hnear=&ll=41.830964,-87.629153&spn=0,359.996551&z=18&layer=c&cbll=41.830963,-87.628981&panoid=xNgziJQ9-3lWNHhUt5ZmvA&cbp=12,347.4,,0,-9.28

JNS
11-15-2009, 10:36 PM
Give this a moment to load. I believe the street-view will pop up and show you the building.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=35th&sll=41.831256,-87.629431&sspn=0.001663,0.003449&gl=us&ie=UTF8&radius=0.09&rq=1&ev=zi&hq=35th&hnear=&ll=41.830964,-87.629153&spn=0,359.996551&z=18&layer=c&cbll=41.830963,-87.628981&panoid=xNgziJQ9-3lWNHhUt5ZmvA&cbp=12,347.4,,0,-9.28


Correct -not the large building with the smokestack, but the little shack on the corner.

And certainly NOT the large brick building - that is the original Armour Institute building - the original IIT building.

soxgirl617
11-16-2009, 07:52 AM
This is the building you're talking about, right?:

http://jonathanfordten.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/338px-2004-09-02_1580x2800_chicago_ibm_building.jpg

They used that building for a few different scenes in The Dark Knight. They used the lobby for a press conference scene and then I believe they used it (the lobby) for Wayne's penthouse (CGI to make it look like the floor was up high). I'm also pretty sure they used some higher floors for other scenes, too, because you can see Hotel Monaco and the Seventeenth Church of Christ in the background (the odd circular building on Wabash and Wacker).

Yes, that's the building. They did indeed use the building for filming several scenes in The Dark Knight. It was cool to have the filming here (they were here for several days at a time, several different times), although I will say that the security people were kind of a pain for those of us who actually work here. But still cool.

35th&Shields
11-18-2009, 08:29 PM
Yes, that's the building. They did indeed use the building for filming several scenes in The Dark Knight. It was cool to have the filming here (they were here for several days at a time, several different times), although I will say that the security people were kind of a pain for those of us who actually work here. But still cool.

The courtroom scenes and the press conference scene where the DA claimed he was Batman were in the Daley Center in the Loop. I'm in one of those courtrooms many times a week and it was funny to see it in a movie. The benches and air vents near the windows are very distinctive. Even my wife recognized what it was, even though she had never been there, just from talking to me many times while waiting for my case to be called.

Hitmen77
11-18-2009, 08:39 PM
Is the building that supposed to be torn down that old, red brick building on the other side of the Dan Ryan?

Absolutely not!

sachin
11-19-2009, 07:48 PM
The object they are removing is not a building. As most people's homes are not considered buildings, expception if they are living in a flat, this should not.

I do not believe that any architect would have this as a piece of his portfolio.:angry:

JNS
11-19-2009, 09:17 PM
The object they are removing is not a building. As most people's homes are not considered buildings, expception if they are living in a flat, this should not.

I do not believe that any architect would have this as a piece of his portfolio.:angry:

By all means knock it down, but it IS a building.

Webster: 1 : a usually roofed and walled structure built for permanent use (as for a dwelling)

Seems to fit the criteria.