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View Full Version : Black Sox: "It Ain't So Kid, It Just Aint So"


thegooch
09-08-2009, 12:02 PM
New article put out by Chicago Lawyer which says the book Eight Men Out may be more fiction than fact.

http://www.chicagolawyermagazine.com/2009/09/01/black-sox-it-aint-so-kid-it-just-aint-so/

Waysouthsider
09-08-2009, 12:15 PM
Thanks for the link....that's a great read.....!

DumpJerry
09-08-2009, 12:17 PM
Interesting. We'll never get to the bottom of what happened, including allegations that being paid off by gamblers was a common occurrence back then.

asindc
09-08-2009, 12:18 PM
Very good piece. I hope that the attorneys pursuing this are able to bring their findings to the attention of MLB.

RedHeadPaleHoser
09-08-2009, 12:55 PM
Asinof admitted he never got access to the court transcripts and didn't confirm the actual dialogue in court.

Must be an ancestor of Jay Mariotti.

TheVulture
09-08-2009, 12:57 PM
Shoeless Joe in 1924 was awarded over 16k in a suit against Comiskey for lost pay 1920-21!? I never knew that! So not only was he cleared in the criminal trial, but also won a civil case for wrongful termination!?! Get this man in the HOF!!

TommyJohn
09-08-2009, 02:06 PM
Shoeless Joe in 1924 was awarded over 16k in a suit against Comiskey for lost pay 1920-21!? I never knew that! So not only was he cleared in the criminal trial, but also won a civil case for wrongful termination!?! Get this man in the HOF!!He did win the civil case, but the judge set aside the jury's verdict and attempted to put Jackson in jail for perjury (because what he said on the stand contradicted his Grand Jury testimony). His jail sentence was overturned on appeal.

bigsoxfan420
09-08-2009, 02:10 PM
Shoeless Joe in 1924 was awarded over 16k in a suit against Comiskey for lost pay 1920-21!? I never knew that! So not only was he cleared in the criminal trial, but also won a civil case for wrongful termination!?! Get this man in the HOF!!


Hell yes!!

gobears1987
09-08-2009, 02:56 PM
I love how Selig and every commissioner following him has upheld the bull**** ruling by Landis. I think any decision made by a man who kept the color barrier in place for over 25 years ought to be reviewed and overturned.

mcg
09-08-2009, 05:26 PM
I read Burying the Black Sox a few years ago and if I recall correctly the author slammed Asinof's Eight Men Out as more fiction than fact. I never bothered to read Eight Men Out but I thought Burying the Black Sox was an excellent book that gave an accurate account of the scandal. And it is fully referenced with endnotes and a bibliography.

eastchicagosoxfan
09-08-2009, 06:52 PM
Interesting. We'll never get to the bottom of what happened, including allegations that being paid off by gamblers was a common occurrence back then.
That's the aspect we'll never know about. There's pleny of circumstancial evidence implicating everyone from Hal Chase, John McGraw, Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, the 1914 A'S, and the 1917 Cubs in various gambling schemes.

TornLabrum
09-08-2009, 09:48 PM
In "Stealing First," Rich Lindberg blasts the "Comiskey the miser" theory to hell by publishing the entire team's salaries in 1919-1920. It would be nice if people investigating the case would actually go to him with information about that. On the other hand, Rich has always maintained that Jackson was guilty, something I've questioned for decades.

Oblong
09-08-2009, 10:11 PM
Based on stuff I've read I can't believe Cobb wasn't suspended and/or banned for life.

Maybe he gave Landis some great investment advice.

ode to veeck
09-09-2009, 12:45 AM
Interesting. We'll never get to the bottom of what happened, including allegations that being paid off by gamblers was a common occurrence back then.

It was pretty common, more than one series before the black sox were highly suspect in the teens

DSpivack
09-09-2009, 01:40 AM
It was pretty common, more than one series before the black sox were highly suspect in the teens

I read Burying the Black Sox a few years ago and if I recall correctly the author slammed Asinof's Eight Men Out as more fiction than fact. I never bothered to read Eight Men Out but I thought Burying the Black Sox was an excellent book that gave an accurate account of the scandal. And it is fully referenced with endnotes and a bibliography.

I'd say the whole era is tainted by possible rampant cheating and fixing, much like steroids today.