PDA

View Full Version : Pitching to Left Field to Pitching


BigP50
07-13-2009, 02:19 AM
Sean Marshall of the Cubs was pitching in the 7th, there was a pitching change so Marshall went to left field. Then the next inning Marshall went back into pitch, I have never seen that b4.

Boondock Saint
07-13-2009, 02:54 AM
Sean Marshall of the Cubs was pitching in the 7th, there was a pitching change so Marshall went to left field. Then the next inning Marshall went back into pitch, I have never seen that b4.

If I remember correctly, Bobby Cox did it with one of his pitchers last year.

jcw218
07-13-2009, 03:44 AM
Sean Marshall of the Cubs was pitching in the 7th, there was a pitching change so Marshall went to left field. Then the next inning Marshall went back into pitch, I have never seen that b4.
Actually, Guzman started the ninth and after 2 on and no out, Marshall relieved Guzman. Marshall walked the 1st batter to load the bases then went to left field when Heilman came in to pitch. Marshall then came back in from LF to face a rh pinchhitter for Schumacher and Rasmus getting out of the bases loaded 1 out jam. Johnson took over in left for Marshall

LITTLE NELL
07-13-2009, 05:08 AM
I remember Sox doing that with Billy Pierce a few times back in the 50s.

WhiteSox1989
07-13-2009, 05:11 AM
I thought it was actually pretty smart.

DumpJerry
07-13-2009, 07:32 AM
Sean Marshall of the Cubs was pitching in the 7th, there was a pitching change so Marshall went to left field. Then the next inning Marshall went back into pitch, I have never seen that b4.
I can't recall seeing a pitcher batting the fourth position, either.

Iwritecode
07-13-2009, 09:38 AM
Actually, Guzman started the ninth and after 2 on and no out, Marshall relieved Guzman. Marshall walked the 1st batter to load the bases then went to left field when Heilman came in to pitch. Marshall then came back in from LF to face a rh pinchhitter for Schumacher and Rasmus getting out of the bases loaded 1 out jam. Johnson took over in left for Marshall

Lou did it because Marshall was the only lefty in the pen.

The fans went absolutely wild when he made the switch. Even though there were losing 4-2 at the time... :rolleyes:

InKennyWeTrust
07-13-2009, 09:57 AM
It ment Soriano was out of the game. Of course they were happy.

jdm2662
07-13-2009, 09:58 AM
Lou did it because Marshall was the only lefty in the pen.

The fans went absolutely wild when he made the switch. Even though there were losing 4-2 at the time... :rolleyes:

Either way, I thought it was pretty cool thing.

DumpJerry
07-13-2009, 10:26 AM
LaRussa got the best of Piniella when, after checking with the umps on the rule, pinch a righty after Marshall returned to the Mound. Under the rules, Marshall had to pitch to at least one batter.:tongue:

salty99
07-13-2009, 10:30 AM
Not really because he got the righty out anyway.

Domeshot17
07-13-2009, 11:17 AM
I will say, as much as I am not a cubs fan This was atleast some evidence Piniella hasn't totally packed it in.

WhiteSoxFTW
07-13-2009, 11:28 AM
LaRussa got the best of Piniella when, after checking with the umps on the rule, pinch a righty after Marshall returned to the Mound. Under the rules, Marshall had to pitch to at least one batter.:tongue:

I thought that was pretty funny.

Jerome
07-13-2009, 12:05 PM
didn't Gary Coleman do that when he was managing the Padres?

Lip Man 1
07-13-2009, 12:17 PM
May 15, 1951 - A testament to the managerial genius of Sox skipper Paul Richards. It was thirty years since the league saw a move like this. In the 9th inning of a game in Boston where the Sox were winning 7 - 6, relief pitcher Harry Dorish was removed in favor of Billy Pierce to face the left handed hitting Ted Williams, only Dorish wasn’t removed from the game! He was moved to third base. Pierce retired Williams on a pop up, then was taken out of the game and Dorish put back on the mound. Boston eventually tied the game but the Sox would have the last laugh, winning 9 - 7 in eleven innings. The win marked the start of a 14 game win streak, with eleven of the wins on the road. On May 30th after sweeping the St. Louis Browns, the Sox record stood at 26 - 9!

June 25, 1953 - Sox manager Paul Richards was regarded as one of the smartest guys ever to lead a team in baseball history. Here’s what I mean...with the Sox going for a series sweep of New York and leading 4 - 2 in the 9th, Richards brings in pitcher Harry Dorish to relieve Billy Pierce. Only Richards doesn’t remove Pierce from the game! He moves him to first base! After Dorish retires his two men, Pierce is brought back to the mound to end the game.

Lip

Foulke You
07-13-2009, 12:43 PM
didn't Gary Coleman do that when he was managing the Padres?
HA! I wasn't the only one thinking about the silly "Kid From Left Field" movie when I saw Lou's move. You are correct, although Coleman put his pitcher at 1B rather than LF for one batter and then back into the ballgame.:D:

TDog
07-13-2009, 01:03 PM
The strategy has been done before. It was done when Lou Piniella was an active player. I don't know if it every happened in a game he was playing in, but he could have read about it if he had read The Sporting News (which gave the incident some attention). Players were more likely to do so in those days because the nature of the publication and players were both different.

On July 6, 1970, the Indians were hosting the Washington Senators. In the eighth with two outs and future White Sox dud Ed Stroud on third and Chuck Brinkman's big brother on second, Indains manager Alvin Dark brought in former no-hit pticher Dean Chance to intentionally walk Frank Howard to pitch to future White Sox slugger Rick Reichardt. The starting pitcher, Sudden Sam McDowell moved to second base.

Reichardt hit a ground ball to future White Sox shortstop Eddie Leon (who had move from second base, replacing Craig Nettles at third). Leon, who had a great mustache, threw to McDowell covering second, and the Indians came up in the bottom of the eighth with thier 6-4 lead still intact.

In the ninth, Buddy Bradford, on haiatus from the White Sox, went in to play right field. Larry Brown went out to play second base. McDowell returned to the mound and struck out the side. Indians win. The save rule was only a couple of years old at the time, but it anticipated this game. McDowell would have qualified for both the win and the save, but the rule specificied that the winning pitcher cannot get the save, and only the pitcher who finishes the game can get the save. Sorry, Dean Chance.

Senators manager Ted Williams, who they say remembered every at bat in his career, may have flashed back to Billy Pierce coming in to face him in 1951. But when the 1970 season was over, he had scoreboard over Dark. The Senators finished 1.5 games over the last place Indians in the American League East.

McDowell went back to the mound in the ninth.