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Viva Medias B's
07-04-2009, 06:27 PM
What current MLB players do you think will become MLB managers someday? Paul Konerko comes to mind. I think Derek Jeter could also be a manager someday.

eastchicagosoxfan
07-04-2009, 06:41 PM
I wonder if Dye has aspirations to manage? By and large, successful managers are guys who worked extremely hard to get the most out of their ability, and they can communicate that work ethic to their players. I think Dye fits that profile.

laxtonto
07-04-2009, 06:47 PM
Omar Vizquel comes to mind for me. So does J. Varitek and C. Jones

Chicken Dinner
07-04-2009, 06:49 PM
I don't think you see a whole lot of multi millionaire players that turn into managers.

Viva Medias B's
07-04-2009, 06:49 PM
I don't think you see a whole lot of multi millionaire players that turn into managers.

Isn't Ozzie Guillen one?

sullythered
07-04-2009, 06:55 PM
I often hear that Henry Blanco will someday manage.

Chicken Dinner
07-04-2009, 06:56 PM
Isn't Ozzie Guillen one?

How much money did he make as a player?

eastchicagosoxfan
07-04-2009, 06:58 PM
I remember Lou Pinella the player was always associated with managing. He was described as a Billy Martin guy, and Martin was a Casey Stengel guy, and Stengel was a John McGraw guy, and McGraw, along with Wilbert Robinson, Hughie Jennings, and I think Pants Rowand, were all Ned Hanlon guys. What the Hell does that run on sentence mean, other than I've had several Independence Day beverages? There's a certain line of successful managers that beget successful managers. Look at Pinella's former or current players for a good future manager. Who mentored Bobby Cox? I don't know, just curious if anyone is familiar with his biography?

Viva Medias B's
07-04-2009, 07:00 PM
How much money did he make as a player?

He did have a seven-figure salary, IIRC.

Chicken Dinner
07-04-2009, 07:09 PM
He did have a seven-figure salary, IIRC.

You are indeed correct!

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/g/guilloz01.shtml?redir

ilsox7
07-04-2009, 07:18 PM
On this Sox team? AJ. I actually think PK and JD are two of the least likely candidates to manage in MLB.

chisoxfanatic
07-04-2009, 07:21 PM
I think either AJ or Thome.

BigP50
07-04-2009, 07:31 PM
Evan Longoria

eastchicagosoxfan
07-04-2009, 07:35 PM
On this Sox team? AJ. I actually think PK and JD are two of the least likely candidates to manage in MLB.
Why do you choose AJ over JD? I'm hardly suggesting JD as a sure thing, but why one over the other, and completely discarding two candidates? What skills do you see in AJ that you don't see in PK or JD?

goofymsfan
07-04-2009, 08:31 PM
Though he recently was sent back to Tacoma, I think possibly Jamie Burke. If not a manager, I can see him as a coach.

Viva Medias B's
07-04-2009, 11:49 PM
Another MLB player who I think may become an MLB manager someday is Jorge Posada.

grenda12
07-04-2009, 11:58 PM
AJ. He knows the game well.

SoxSpeed22
07-05-2009, 12:02 AM
I definitely agree with Henry Blanco and Jorge Posada. I also think Yadier Molina, Brad Ausmus and Jack Wilson can manage. Seems like catchers do well as managers since they have experience in handling pitching staffs. Shortstops have experience in leading the infield.
Buehrle can be a pitching coach. He's getting some good on-the-job training with Danks and Richard. Joe Mauer should make a very good hitting coach or manager.

HomeFish
07-05-2009, 02:10 AM
Why do you choose AJ over JD? I'm hardly suggesting JD as a sure thing, but why one over the other, and completely discarding two candidates? What skills do you see in AJ that you don't see in PK or JD?

AJ is a catcher. Many managers are ex-catchers. It's a catcher stereotype -- or a manager stereotype, not sure which.

HomeFish
07-05-2009, 02:11 AM
Then again, when Ozzie was with the Sox, who in their right mind would think that he would one day manage the Sox and win a World Series while doing so?

TDog
07-05-2009, 03:14 AM
Then again, when Ozzie was with the Sox, who in their right mind would think that he would one day manage the Sox and win a World Series while doing so?

That's close to what I was thinking. You wouldn't have expect Ozzie Guillen to grown up to become a manager. You probably wouldn't have guessed Joey Cora, but he will probably manage someday.

A lot of managers are guys you didn't notice were in the majors unless you were paying close attention, such as Jerry Manuel and Bob Geren. I saw Tony LaRussa play for the Cubs, but he only appeared in one game, and only as a pinch-runner. When Dale Sveum played for the White Sox in 1992, did anyone expect he would be managing in the postseason someday?

I honestly don't see anyone on the current White Sox roster who I would expect to see managing someday, except maybe DeWayne Wise.

chisoxfanatic
07-05-2009, 04:28 AM
Why do you choose AJ over JD? I'm hardly suggesting JD as a sure thing, but why one over the other, and completely discarding two candidates? What skills do you see in AJ that you don't see in PK or JD?
AJ seems to remember the rules of baseball than noone else does and uses it to his (and his team's) advantage.

Viva Medias B's
07-05-2009, 07:50 AM
Despite his reportedly being associated with PEDs, could Ivan Rodriguez also fall into this category?

Brian26
07-05-2009, 09:19 AM
What current MLB players do you think will become MLB managers someday? Paul Konerko comes to mind. I think Derek Jeter could also be a manager someday.

I think Konerko would be good in the broadcast booth one day. He's fairly elloquent and introspective about the game already. With some tutoring, he could be a good color guy.

TornLabrum
07-05-2009, 09:41 AM
Paul Konerko is the guy who changed his batting stance when he was hitting something like .350 and promptly went into one of those prolonged slumps. He second guesses himself too much to be a manager.

DumpJerry
07-05-2009, 10:18 AM
Brian Anderson. He inspires legions of fans.

doublem23
07-05-2009, 10:44 AM
I don't know if anyone on this team will definitely manage, there are some interesting candidates, but the last player on the Sox that I definitely think will wind up managing a team somewhere is Sandy Alomar, Jr.

slavko
07-05-2009, 11:01 AM
That's close to what I was thinking. You wouldn't have expect Ozzie Guillen to grown up to become a manager. You probably wouldn't have guessed Joey Cora, but he will probably manage someday.

A lot of managers are guys you didn't notice were in the majors unless you were paying close attention, such as Jerry Manuel and Bob Geren. I saw Tony LaRussa play for the Cubs, but he only appeared in one game, and only as a pinch-runner. When Dale Sveum played for the White Sox in 1992, did anyone expect he would be managing in the postseason someday?

I honestly don't see anyone on the current White Sox roster who I would expect to see managing someday, except maybe DeWayne Wise.

Who says Ozzie is grown up?

AJ and JD, AJ more obvious because of the position he plays but don't overlook JD's quiet strength and leadership. Wise not a bad thought because that's the type of fringe player who studies the game and manages someday. Thome no, too many bucks in the bank.

goon
07-05-2009, 11:28 AM
Placido Polanco.

ernie14
07-05-2009, 11:42 AM
Milton bradley!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Manny ramirez !!!!!!!!!!!!

Over By There
07-05-2009, 12:23 PM
AJ is a catcher. Many managers are ex-catchers. It's a catcher stereotype -- or a manager stereotype, not sure which.

I'd be curious what percentage of players-turned-managers were catchers. It sure seems like most of the time you hear, "he's going to be a good manager some day" it's about a catcher.

Whappeh
07-05-2009, 12:46 PM
Milton bradley!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Manny ramirez !!!!!!!!!!!!
I would pay 300 dollars for a bleacher seat to see those two teams play.

TDog
07-05-2009, 12:49 PM
Who says Ozzie is grown up?

AJ and JD, AJ more obvious because of the position he plays but don't overlook JD's quiet strength and leadership. Wise not a bad thought because that's the type of fringe player who studies the game and manages someday. Thome no, too many bucks in the bank.

When I was living in Yuma, Arizona, spring training home of the San Diego Padres before the state of Maricopa robbed most to the rest of the state of its Cactus League teams, there were fun stories about Ozzie Guillen as a kid coming up into professional baseball. He was only a young White Sox shortstop at the time, but with his personality he had made quite an impression in Yuma on some of my good friends. In comparison to the Padres farmhand that he was, Oswaldo Guillen has certainly grown up.

Players who go on to become managers are often players who have spent a lot of time in the minor leagues and are more of the working Joes when they get to the majors. They are generally people who go back to work in the minors when their career is done. There are exceptions and always have been, but managing isn't a natural step up from playing. It isn't like jobs where management is a promotion. If you're a star player, it would mean a pay cut. Going the television commentary route often pays more money and is much easier. Joe Morgan the announcer has said he would never manage.

You have to love the baseball business in a specific way. Sometimes, as in the case of Lou Piniella, there is some ego involved, but generally managers are people who get into it because they believe they need to continue working for a living and baseball is what they know. Others don't need to work, but they love baseball so much that they put up with the headaches of being a manager.

I don't see Pierzynski, Thome or Konerko wanting to go through the hassle of becoming a manager. As free agents, they fielded offers (or certainly could have in Konerko's case). To manage, they would have to interview along with other, perhaps more qualified candidates. They signed contracts that set them up for life so they wouldn't have to manage after they retired. They don't need the money. But Jerry Manuel and Bob Geren do.

Looking at a player like Evan Longoria and suggesting he will be a major league manager someday is the longest of longshots. If Longoria suffered a career-ending injury in the next year or two, his chances of going on to manage would be enhanced.

You couldn't have predicted that Clint Hurdle would one day manage a team to the World Series when he graced the cover of Sports Illustrated as the next big baseball thing. But if he had been the next big baseball thing, he probably wouldn't have become a manager.

Daver
07-05-2009, 12:59 PM
I'd be curious what percentage of players-turned-managers were catchers. It sure seems like most of the time you hear, "he's going to be a good manager some day" it's about a catcher.

Wearing the tools of ignorance prepares you to manage more than any other position, even today where wearing the tools is a lot easier than it was 20 years ago.

forrestg
07-06-2009, 02:48 PM
Why do you choose AJ over JD? I'm hardly suggesting JD as a sure thing, but why one over the other, and completely discarding two candidates? What skills do you see in AJ that you don't see in PK or JD? Jd is an outfielder the catcher is involved in every play. In spring training AJ and Ozzie would have a discussion every inning. One thing about AJ, he knows the rules and has used them for our advantage. Definately AJ.

Ditka v. God
07-06-2009, 03:39 PM
Chris Coste seems like he'd be a terrific manager someday, David Eckstein is the scrappy type of player that I could see managing in the future and, going out on a limb, Rick Ankiel could be an interesting candidate to manage as well due to his amazing past and resolve.

I think Barry Zito and Tom Glavine will make great pitching coaches along with Buerhle.

goofymsfan
07-06-2009, 04:20 PM
I can see Jamie Moyer being a pitching coach when/if he retires.

guillen4life13
07-06-2009, 05:02 PM
Doug Mirabelli
Michael Young
Aaron Rowand (I know, I know...)
Mike Matheny (does he still play?)
Brian Roberts

I could see Frank Thomas and Joe Mauer as hitting coaches someday also.

TDog
07-06-2009, 06:03 PM
...
I could see Frank Thomas and Joe Mauer as hitting coaches someday also.

I can't see Frank Thomas as a hitting coach. I don't know enough about Joe Mauer to make a judgement.

You don't judge whether someone would make a good hitting coach by watching them hit. Some people believe Rudy Jaramillo is the best hitting coach in baseball. He never hit in the major leagues. Some people believe Charlie Lau was the best hitting coach ever. I saw him hit, and wouldn't have believed hitting coach was in his future. (Granted, I was only 10 years old, but his stats support my observation).

Ted Williams, however, was a great hitting coach. Reviews on Rod Carew are mixed, but he was a major league coach for 10 years. But you can't simply look at a hitter and tell if he's going to be a good hitting coach.

Huisj
07-06-2009, 06:11 PM
I've always figured Brad Ausmus will be a manager someday, maybe fairly soon even. Catchers who stick around in a role like him seem like naturals. He's another Girardi, only probably better.

doublem23
07-06-2009, 06:39 PM
Ted Williams, however, was a great hitting coach. Reviews on Rod Carew are mixed, but he was a major league coach for 10 years. But you can't simply look at a hitter and tell if he's going to be a good hitting coach.

I always thought Williams was a ****ty coach. Or, he at least was a ****ty manager.

TDog
07-06-2009, 07:33 PM
I always thought Williams was a ****ty coach. Or, he at least was a ****ty manager.

When Williams was managing the Senators/Rangers, he acted as the hitting coach. He was a great hitting coach, probably the best in the Rangers' history. He enjoyed helping people with their hitting so much, the Rangers established a fine if he was caught talking with an opposing hitter. He was not a great handler of pitchers. Not that a manager needs to be a pitching coach, but he had little patience with pitchers and was criticized for having too quick a hook.

Opinions of players who played for Ted Williams was generally split. Hitters, including Frank Howard, loved him. And it shows in the stats. Howard was always a big power hitter, but where you see the improvement in Howard under Williams is his on-base percentage even more than his batting average. You also see Howard walked more and struck out less. In 1967, Howard struck out 141 times and walked 54 times, 12 times intentionally. The previous season, he led the American League with 155 strikeouts while walking 60 times, seven times intentionally. In 1969 under Williams, Howard played 161 games and struck out only 96 times, the first time in his career he had played more than 100 games and not struck out at least 100 times. He also walked 102 times, exceeding 60 for the first time. Nineteen of those walks were intentional, but he also hit .296 with an on-base percentage of .402 --an increase of 65 points. The next year, he led the league in home runs, RBIs, overall walks and intentional walks while recording on on-base percentage of .416, although his batting aveaged dropped to .283.

Pitchers, however, seem to have hated playing for Williams. As Bill Gogolewski once said after a good start in 1973 after Williams left the Rangers (I don't remember if Billy Martin or Whitey Herzog was managing at the time), "If you were pitching for Ted Williams, the wall knew more than you did."

Law11
07-07-2009, 12:32 PM
Greg Maddux.

LoveYourSuit
07-07-2009, 12:43 PM
I don't think you see a whole lot of multi millionaire players that turn into managers.

Agreed.

Chez
07-07-2009, 01:37 PM
I don't think you see a whole lot of multi millionaire players that turn into managers.

I think, in general, you are right. I also have a hard time envisioning former stars willing to pay their dues -- managing in the low minors, riding on buses, staying in one star hotels, and working their way up to the majors. You have to admire what Ryne Sandberg is doing in the Cubs organization.

WhiteSoxJunkie
07-07-2009, 02:48 PM
Albert Pujols would be a hell of a hitting coach.

soxnut1018
07-07-2009, 03:26 PM
Timo Perez and Pablo Ozuna.

TDog
07-07-2009, 03:38 PM
Albert Pujols would be a hell of a hitting coach.

Why do you believe that?

RedHeadPaleHoser
07-07-2009, 03:49 PM
I go with AJ. I see him being a hell of a manager in the way of Mike Scioscia.