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Lip Man 1
07-03-2009, 11:17 PM
Now this is the way to celebrate the holiday!

http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/cover/featured/7673/index.htm

Lip

kingpin_rcs
07-04-2009, 12:55 AM
Now this is the way to celebrate the holiday!

http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/cover/featured/7673/index.htm

Lip

Love it.

It used to be a unique thing that the Sox were known for. Now just abut everyone does it.

tick53
07-05-2009, 08:54 AM
Love it.

It used to be a unique thing that the Sox were known for. Now just abut everyone does it.

Exactly! The day will soon come when nobody remembers that.

34rancher
07-05-2009, 09:19 AM
Exactly! The day will soon come when nobody remembers that.

It already is. I was in Kansas city recently with a Cleveland fan. Kansas city has started shooting fireworks when a royal hits a homerun from the scoreboard. I remarked how they were following the patterns and traditions of the white sox. The Cleveland and royal fans think everyone does it, it's not just a white sox thing. They wouldn't believe until a cub fan intervened and even pointed out thunderstruck when lineups were introduced.

VA_GoGoSox
07-05-2009, 11:26 AM
It already is. I was in Kansas city recently with a Cleveland fan. Kansas city has started shooting fireworks when a royal hits a homerun from the scoreboard. I remarked how they were following the patterns and traditions of the white sox. The Cleveland and royal fans think everyone does it, it's not just a white sox thing. They wouldn't believe until a cub fan intervened and even pointed out thunderstruck when lineups were introduced.

I had to start laughing when the Sox pulled a pitcher yesterday and "NaNa Hey Hey Goodbye" started playing on the PA in Kansas City. How hard is it to come up with your own traditions/celebrations?

skobabe8
07-05-2009, 01:00 PM
Love it.

It used to be a unique thing that the Sox were known for. Now just abut everyone does it.

It sounded like Cleveland shoots fireworks after the opposing team records the third out of the inning. I thought I heard them whenever the Sox were at bat after the last out of each inning.

TDog
07-05-2009, 02:59 PM
I had to start laughing when the Sox pulled a pitcher yesterday and "NaNa Hey Hey Goodbye" started playing on the PA in Kansas City. How hard is it to come up with your own traditions/celebrations?

It isn't that Kansas City is stealing a White Sox tradition. I seriously doubt they do that unless they knock out a White Sox pitcher.

That, of course, goes back to 1977, when the Na-Na thing became popular. The song was among the songs on Nancy Faust's original playlist in 1970, having been a hit from late in 1969. But in 1977, fans picked up on singing along and it became the tradition it is. Mercury Records even re-released the Steam single and put it in a picture jacket with a White Sox logo, calling it parenthetically, The White Sox Theme.

The 1977 season peaked for the Sox at the end of July. The Sox took three of four from the Royals that weekend, losing only the second game of the doubleheader. They were 5.5 games in front of the Royals and Twins in the West. All weekend long, Nancy Faust and the crowds were doing the Na-Na thing, and it was really irritating the Royals.

The next weekend, the Royals swept the Sox in a three-game series in Kansas City, cutting the White Sox lead to just a half game ahead of the Twins and 1.5 games ahead of the Royals. In the Friday night game, John Mayberry hit a home run to lead off the fourth to run the score to 6-1, en route to a 12-2 thrashing. As Mayberry rounded the bases, slowly, the organist played the Na-Na song dirge-like. After the game, Mayberry and others trash talked the Sox and their fans. Of course, the Sox finished in third place, 13 games behind the Royals.

Playing the Na-Na song when the Sox are in town really is a Royals tradition, specifically their own.

The Sports Illustrated cover is really a lousy picture, as much as I like the subject matter.

TommyJohn
07-05-2009, 03:53 PM
After the game, Mayberry and others trash talked the Sox and their fans. Of course, the Sox finished in third place, 13 games behind the Royals.


Which is why I now love the 1977 Yankees. The Royals went into the 9th inning of game 5 up 3-2, with their fans screaming and KC three outs away from the pennant. The Yankees rallied to win 5-3 and sent the Royals and their fans home crushed and heartbroken. A beautiful ending.

TDog
07-05-2009, 04:11 PM
Which is why I now love the 1977 Yankees. The Royals went into the 9th inning of game 5 up 3-2, with their fans screaming and KC three outs away from the pennant. The Yankees rallied to win 5-3 and sent the Royals and their fans home crushed and heartbroken. A beautiful ending.

I heard that last inning on my car radio, driving on I-65 in Indiana. I was sure it was over when the Royals put Dennis Leonard, their best starter, in to finish the game. A single and a walk, and in case Larry Gura, but the bleeding continued. Funny thing is, I still hated the Yankees more than the Royals.

For the most part, I hate every team except for the White Sox. The degrees of hate vary. There are a couple of National League teams I have liked, because they play in a different league -- the Giants, Padres and Diamondbacks.

I hated the Royals. I still do. Not as much as I have always hated the A's, and certainly not as much as I have always hated the Yankees.

VA_GoGoSox
07-05-2009, 04:33 PM
It isn't that Kansas City is stealing a White Sox tradition. I seriously doubt they do that unless they knock out a White Sox pitcher.

That, of course, goes back to 1977, when the Na-Na thing became popular. The song was among the songs on Nancy Faust's original playlist in 1970, having been a hit from late in 1969. But in 1977, fans picked up on singing along and it became the tradition it is. Mercury Records even re-released the Steam single and put it in a picture jacket with a White Sox logo, calling it parenthetically, The White Sox Theme.

The 1977 season peaked for the Sox at the end of July. The Sox took three of four from the Royals that weekend, losing only the second game of the doubleheader. They were 5.5 games in front of the Royals and Twins in the West. All weekend long, Nancy Faust and the crowds were doing the Na-Na thing, and it was really irritating the Royals.

The next weekend, the Royals swept the Sox in a three-game series in Kansas City, cutting the White Sox lead to just a half game ahead of the Twins and 1.5 games ahead of the Royals. In the Friday night game, John Mayberry hit a home run to lead off the fourth to run the score to 6-1, en route to a 12-2 thrashing. As Mayberry rounded the bases, slowly, the organist played the Na-Na song dirge-like. After the game, Mayberry and others trash talked the Sox and their fans. Of course, the Sox finished in third place, 13 games behind the Royals.

Playing the Na-Na song when the Sox are in town really is a Royals tradition, specifically their own.

The Sports Illustrated cover is really a lousy picture, as much as I like the subject matter.

This is why I love WSI. Thanks for the education!

tebman
07-05-2009, 05:12 PM
The Sports Illustrated cover is really a lousy picture, as much as I like the subject matter.

Have to agree. I don't know when they would've gotten that shot because the scoreboard lights should have been brightly lit as the fireworks were going off. Maybe the picture was posed just for the SI photographer.

The goofy beauty of the original board was that it really did look like it was blowing its top when it went off. Lights didn't just chase around the perimeter like a parking-lot sign, they flashed and danced in different directions, reversing themselves, sequencing in crazy ways. At the same time, Roman candles spit out of the tops of the mortars while strobe lights on the face of the board flashed in random patterns. The big fireworks went off, of course, and loud sound effects (sirens, Hallelujah Chorus, dive bombers, etc.) boomed out of the speaker array in center field.

It was gloriously nuts. That picture on the SI cover looks lovely, but it's too demure to capture the old board's personality.

Lip Man 1
07-05-2009, 06:18 PM
Here ya go:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=14&id=2241

Click on the 1964 or 1965 links to hear what the Monster sounded like.

Lip

Noneck
07-05-2009, 06:38 PM
What most don't realize was that the monster was so much more than fireworks. The sounds, the lights, the pin wheels twirling, love to see and hear it again.

TDog
07-05-2009, 07:03 PM
What most don't realize was that the monster was so much more than fireworks. The sounds, the lights, the pin wheels twirling, love to see and hear it again.

Bill Veeck based the scoreboard on a pinball machine in a William Saroyan play, The Time of Your Life. It wasn't just about the fireworks.