PDA

View Full Version : A general baseball observation


Windy City
06-29-2009, 07:26 PM
Baseball is an odd little game with many quirks not found in other sports. I always wondered why don't hitting coaches make trips to talk to hitters during at-bats when a batter is down 0-2 or 1-2 in the count in the same manner as pitching coaches do when a hurler is having a rough time on the hill?

Daver
06-29-2009, 07:27 PM
Baseball is an odd little game with many quirks not found in other sports. I always wondered why don't hitting coaches make trips to talk to hitters during at-bats when a batter is down 0-2 or 1-2 in the count in the same manner as pitching coaches do when a hurler is having a rough time on the hill?

To avoid being thrown out for delaying the game.

Huisj
06-29-2009, 08:51 PM
So why do pitchers get the privilege of delaying the game for coaching advice while hitters don't?

Daver
06-29-2009, 08:55 PM
So why do pitchers get the privilege of delaying the game for coaching advice while hitters don't?

Because they don't change pitchers for every hitter?

I want Mags back
06-29-2009, 09:17 PM
So why do pitchers get the privilege of delaying the game for coaching advice while hitters don't?
:scratch:
You're aware they can only do it once an inning before the pitcher needs to be pulled, right?

TDog
06-29-2009, 09:30 PM
In theory, a hitter can be in communication with the coaching staff before every pitch.

Huisj
06-29-2009, 10:48 PM
:scratch:
You're aware they can only do it once an inning before the pitcher needs to be pulled, right?

Come on, yes I know that. That still doesn't change that the pitching coach routinely walks out to the mound to calm a pitcher down when things aren't quite going right. You never see a hitting coach do the same for a hitter who has just swung and missed at two terrible pitches, fouled off a bunt because he jabbed at the ball instead of letting it come to the bat, or swung out of his shoes and stepped in the bucket when all that was needed was a single.

Now obviously, a batter is not up to bat for as long as a pitcher is out on the mound, so in some ways to can get coaching quickly as soon as they are back in the dugout. But still, is there anything illegal about a hitting coach coming on the field during an at bat if they wanted to have short meeting? Or am I just a complete idiot for wondering this (which looks like it may be the case based on the responses so far)?

veeter
06-29-2009, 11:16 PM
The third base coach calls him down once in a while.

Windy City
06-29-2009, 11:43 PM
Come on, yes I know that. That still doesn't change that the pitching coach routinely walks out to the mound to calm a pitcher down when things aren't quite going right. You never see a hitting coach do the same for a hitter who has just swung and missed at two terrible pitches, fouled off a bunt because he jabbed at the ball instead of letting it come to the bat, or swung out of his shoes and stepped in the bucket when all that was needed was a single.

Now obviously, a batter is not up to bat for as long as a pitcher is out on the mound, so in some ways to can get coaching quickly as soon as they are back in the dugout. But still, is there anything illegal about a hitting coach coming on the field during an at bat if they wanted to have short meeting? Or am I just a complete idiot for wondering this (which looks like it may be the case based on the responses so far)?

I don't think a coach is restricted from calling time and talking to the hitter. That is a good rule book question.

FiliusAndreas
06-30-2009, 09:28 AM
I don't think a coach is restricted from calling time and talking to the hitter. That is a good rule book question.

They're not, though as already stated the advice will usually come in the form of a quick meeting with the third base coach. I always imagine them to be rather one-sided meetings about how hitter-X is doing a crappy job getting a bunt down.

UofCSoxFan
06-30-2009, 10:58 AM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned how counter-productive this would be. Pitching coaches don't head out as soon as a pitcher gets behind a batter, but rather when they see a mechanical flaw repeated and want it corrected (they also will go out to give the pitcher a mental breather).

Most batters take probably about 2 to 3 swings in an at-bat, as the ball is usually put in play or there is a K after the second. That would mean the hitting coach would have to come out after 1 swing, which may have just been bad b/c the hitter was fooled. Moreover, being in the batter's box of a live game is the absolute worst spot to work on a mechanical flaw. That is what batting practice and hitting tees are for. The last thing you want is a hitter "thinking" about his swing while down 1-2 in a count.

Hitting coaches may say something after a complete at-bat but there is no need for them to go out on the field to calm a hitter down. If a guy freaks out every time they are down 1-2, chances are they stopped playing baseball before high school, let alone made it to the major leagues.

UofCSoxFan
06-30-2009, 10:59 AM
I don't think a coach is restricted from calling time and talking to the hitter. That is a good rule book question.

I'm pretty sure the IHSA has a limit, but I'm not sure about MLB.

fram40
07-01-2009, 04:23 PM
How about manager Lou Piniella coming out of the dugout and to give base stealing advice to the base runner on first during the 2000 LDS.

Seems like the same thing as a coach coming out of the dugout during an at bat

asindc
07-01-2009, 04:45 PM
How about manager Lou Piniella coming out of the dugout and to give base stealing advice to the base runner on first during the 2000 LDS.

Seems like the same thing as a coach coming out of the dugout during an at bat

Good point. In that instance, the idea was to get the pitcher (I forget who it was off-hand) out of his rhythm. Unfortunately, it worked.

white sox bill
07-02-2009, 01:30 PM
Got one of my own:

If say AJ is behind the plate, he looks over to Ozzie for a sign for the Pitcher. Oz then gives AJ the sign and AJ relayes to Pitcher. Why doesn't Ozzie just flash sign to Pitcher directly? Is this done to prevent signs being stolen? I was a catcher way back in my teen yrs but we never had anything like that

JohnTucker0814
07-02-2009, 01:31 PM
Got one of my own:

If say AJ is behind the plate, he looks over to Ozzie for a sign for the Pitcher. Oz then gives AJ the sign and AJ relayes to Pitcher. Why doesn't Ozzie just flash sign to Pitcher directly? Is this done to prevent signs being stolen? I was a catcher way back in my teen yrs but we never had anything like that

This is to ensure that both the catcher and pitcher are on the same page. If the pitcher gets the sign from Ozzie and the catcher doesn't get it, that could get someone hurt! Better to have the catcher relay the signal to the pitcher to make sure everyone else is on the same page!

white sox bill
07-02-2009, 01:37 PM
This is to ensure that both the catcher and pitcher are on the same page. If the pitcher gets the sign from Ozzie and the catcher doesn't get it, that could get someone hurt! Better to have the catcher relay the signal to the pitcher to make sure everyone else is on the same page!
Thanks for the answer--but let me play Devils Advocate. Is it ever possible to get the sign lost in translation ever? Seems more people involved, more chance. But maybe not too.

Iwritecode
07-02-2009, 01:54 PM
Thanks for the answer--but let me play Devils Advocate. Is it ever possible to get the sign lost in translation ever? Seems more people involved, more chance. But maybe not too.

Well I've certainly seen where a pitcher and catcher get crossed up and the pitcher throws something the catcher isn't expecting but I've always been curious what exactly does the manager signal from the dugout? Does he call specific pitches or just signal for pitch-outs and stuff like that?

I've always thought that the catcher would be more suited to know which pitches to throw depending on what pitches are working that day and what happened in previous AB's etc...