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View Full Version : How many Sox players have college degrees?


WhiteSoxJunkie
06-25-2009, 09:11 PM
I read in Sports Illustrated that only 26 out of 1,042 Major League players and managers have college degrees. This got me thinking if any of them are on the White Sox. The only ones that I can think of that might are Fields and Beckham. I know they both attended college, Fields at Oklahoma St. and Beckham at Georgia. But I don't know if either graduated. Alot of other guys on the team were in the minors at a young age and probably never even attended college (Dye, Floyd, Danks, etc.) Does anybody know which Sox players have college degrees?

On a side note, it's ironic to think how baseball players get off easy about a lack of education when everyone complains about NBA players. Also, this just gives Bryce Harper more credence to drop out of high school after 2 years.

pilotsox
06-25-2009, 09:18 PM
I'm an educated guy. I just graduated from a good university with a four year degree. So certainly nothing against it, but if you can make millions of dollars without a degree, why wouldn't you?

I went to school for the purpose of making money. I'm going Army shortly, and once I get done with my service to my country, I'm going to do my damndest to make big bucks. These ballplayers found a quick route to that, so why would they waste time? Get on the path to riches ASAP!

As for your initial question, I have no idea, honestly.

And PS- mind boggling sig, I must say.

DSpivack
06-25-2009, 09:48 PM
I'm an educated guy. I just graduated from a good university with a four year degree. So certainly nothing against it, but if you can make millions of dollars without a degree, why wouldn't you?

I went to school for the purpose of making money. I'm going Army shortly, and once I get done with my service to my country, I'm going to do my damndest to make big bucks. These ballplayers found a quick route to that, so why would they waste time? Get on the path to riches ASAP!

As for your initial question, I have no idea, honestly.

And PS- mind boggling sig, I must say.

Well, any basketball player drafted in the 1st round gets a contract worth millions.

As for baseball, it might be the same case, that any first rounder gets a good chunk of change, but the majority of minor leaguers drafted out of high school aren't really making much money.

Konerko05
06-25-2009, 09:49 PM
Carlos Quentin has a degree from Stanford.

chisoxfanatic
06-25-2009, 09:53 PM
I know he's not on the Sox anymore. But, Neal Cotts finished his degree in accounting at the world's greatest university--THE Illinois State University.

DSpivack
06-25-2009, 09:53 PM
Carlos Quentin has a degree from Stanford.

Same school as his GM. Can't be too many of those in sports.

WhiteSoxJunkie
06-25-2009, 09:57 PM
Carlos Quentin has a degree from Stanford.

A degree in what?

34rancher
06-25-2009, 10:11 PM
Carlos Quentin has a degree from Stanford.
Uh Hmmmm....I believe it is THE Carlos Quentin....
I believe his degree is in Political Science.

You might also be interested in this...
http://www.baseball-fever.com/showthread.php?t=91097

WhiteSox5187
06-25-2009, 10:32 PM
Same school as his GM. Can't be too many of those in sports.

Kenny never graduated from Stanford.

DSpivack
06-25-2009, 10:34 PM
Kenny never graduated from Stanford.

Didn't know that, thanks.

MarkZ35
06-26-2009, 01:34 AM
I believe many baseball players think along the lines that you can go back to school at any age if it doesn't work out at baseball but you can't always play baseball. Some even get decent signing bonuses out of high school for doing nothing so it is hard to pass up. This is even more true for pitchers because you can throw your arm out in college and only get a degree out of it which isn't bad but if you make enough through baseball than you can afford to pay for it later. More power to the players that do have degrees but for the players who take the chance to live out a life long dream to play in the big leagues but it doesn't work out and only play minor league ball get as much credit from me.

rookie
06-26-2009, 01:46 AM
I read in Sports Illustrated that only 26 out of 1,042 Major League players and managers have college degrees. This got me thinking if any of them are on the White Sox. The only ones that I can think of that might are Fields and Beckham. I know they both attended college, Fields at Oklahoma St. and Beckham at Georgia. But I don't know if either graduated. Alot of other guys on the team were in the minors at a young age and probably never even attended college (Dye, Floyd, Danks, etc.) Does anybody know which Sox players have college degrees?

On a side note, it's ironic to think how baseball players get off easy about a lack of education when everyone complains about NBA players. Also, this just gives Bryce Harper more credence to drop out of high school after 2 years.

It's more than ironic, but that's all I'm going to say about that. Very few soccer players have college degrees, at least internationally. Tennis players. Olympians. There was an article in the Trib about this when the whole thing came out about Derrick Rose. If you're an atheletic prodigy, somethings gotta give. Sometimes I wonder if this is something that Americans get hung up on because a free and public education is such an important part of our society.

I think it's important to have a college education, but I'm sure we all know of tons of people who spent a whole lot of money on college and it was not the investment they thought it would be.

As a female I always wonder about females who go the housewife route before they get the return on their educational investment. Sure, they will always have their degree just in case, but it some fields you can't just jump back in right where you left off. I know they are investing in their children which cannot be measured, but still, it's hard for women to have to make that choice. (Or the men who turn down income for their family's sake).

As for the athletes, it's a gamble, but it's also their dream. Hindsight is 50/50, for everyone.

SephClone89
06-26-2009, 03:24 AM
I know he's not on the Sox anymore. But, Neal Cotts finished his degree in accounting at the world's greatest university--THE Illinois State University.

:thumbsup:

Huisj
06-26-2009, 10:13 AM
He's been gone for a long time, but I believe Kelly Wunsch had an engineering degree from Texas A&M.

thedudeabides
06-26-2009, 11:14 AM
It's more than ironic, but that's all I'm going to say about that. Very few soccer players have college degrees, at least internationally. Tennis players. Olympians. There was an article in the Trib about this when the whole thing came out about Derrick Rose. If you're an atheletic prodigy, somethings gotta give. Sometimes I wonder if this is something that Americans get hung up on because a free and public education is such an important part of our society.

I think it's important to have a college education, but I'm sure we all know of tons of people who spent a whole lot of money on college and it was not the investment they thought it would be.

As a female I always wonder about females who go the housewife route before they get the return on their educational investment. Sure, they will always have their degree just in case, but it some fields you can't just jump back in right where you left off. I know they are investing in their children which cannot be measured, but still, it's hard for women to have to make that choice. (Or the men who turn down income for their family's sake).

As for the athletes, it's a gamble, but it's also their dream. Hindsight is 50/50, for everyone.

Don't forget about the NHL. Many of those hockey players leave high school to play professionally.

BleacherBandit
06-26-2009, 12:31 PM
Given that a lot of ballplayers start playing in the minor leagues before they're 22, I've always assumed that most of them don't have a college degree.

StillMissOzzie
06-26-2009, 02:33 PM
I know he's not on the Sox anymore. But, Neal Cotts finished his degree in accounting at the world's greatest university--THE Illinois State University.

And the way he pitched for the Cubs, he may need that to fall back on!


As for baseball, it might be the same case, that any first rounder gets a good chunk of change, but the majority of minor leaguers drafted out of high school aren't really making much money.

My nephew was drafted right out of high school in 2005 for a decent chunk of change, but part of that money is earmarked for college he case he doesn't make it or suffers a career-ending injury.

For the most part, though, college is to prepare you for a money-earning career. If you don't need college for a job where the minimum wage is over $400,000 a year (still just a bit more than THIS college graduate is pulling down), then why bother?

SMO
:scratch:

DSpivack
06-26-2009, 02:37 PM
And the way he pitched for the Cubs, he may need that to fall back on!



My nephew was drafted right out of high school in 2005 for a decent chunk of change, but part of that money is earmarked for college he case he doesn't make it or suffers a career-ending injury.

For the most part, though, college is to prepare you for a money-earning career. If you don't need college for a job where the minimum wage is over $400,000 a year (still just a bit more than THIS college graduate is pulling down), then why bother?

SMO
:scratch:

But that's not really the case, that salary is only the minimum for major leaguers, and only a very small percentage make it to the show. I've heard a lot of criticism for basketball players who either went straight from HS, or come out after a year, but that's completely different, they have guaranteed contracts in the millions, assuming they're drafted in the first round. I've seldom heard a similar criticism when it comes baseball players, and it's a much bigger financial risk.

Red Barchetta
06-26-2009, 03:08 PM
I read in Sports Illustrated that only 26 out of 1,042 Major League players and managers have college degrees. This got me thinking if any of them are on the White Sox. The only ones that I can think of that might are Fields and Beckham. I know they both attended college, Fields at Oklahoma St. and Beckham at Georgia. But I don't know if either graduated. Alot of other guys on the team were in the minors at a young age and probably never even attended college (Dye, Floyd, Danks, etc.) Does anybody know which Sox players have college degrees?

On a side note, it's ironic to think how baseball players get off easy about a lack of education when everyone complains about NBA players. Also, this just gives Bryce Harper more credence to drop out of high school after 2 years.

What the numbers don't tell is the story of all the other minor league players who don't make it to the major leagues. I know baseball organizations would rather draft a player out of high school vs. college as that provides them an additional 4 years to develop the players through their systems.

They need to draft a large amount of players, simply to provide competition and real-life experience to the relatively few players who make to the major league level.

I agree that if you can secure a large contact at any level, you're better off taking it as tomorrow is not guaranteed. However, I would hope more players go back to school if their career's are cut short.

This would be an interesting study.